SFNF: Managed Pino Fire Proceeds According To Plan

Firefighters use hand and aerial ignitions to direct the Pino wildfire to control features, removing hazardous fuels and minimizing the threat of future high intensity wildfires. Photo by Ryszard Wasilewski/jemezdailypost.com
 
Photo by Ryszard Wasilewski/jemezdailypost.com

SFNF News:

SANTA FE – Fire managers were very pleased with the activity on the Pino Fire Tuesday. Firefighters used hand and aerial ignitions to direct the wildfire to control features, removing hazardous fuels and minimizing the threat of future high intensity wildfires.

The lightning caused Pino wildfire is now estimated at 1,618 acres, buring on Santa Fe National Forest’s Jemez Ranger District five miles south of N.M. 4 and six miles east of Jemez Springs.

Pioneer forest manager Aldo Leopold stated that the first rule of intelligent tinkering is to save all the parts. For decades, natural fire was the part missing from forested ecosystems. Management of the Pino wildfire is a fine example of how natural fire can be used to benefit the landscape and all of its components.

Hand and aerial ignitions were used again today to direct the wildfire over an area similar in size to Monday’s activity. Large columns of smoke from this ignition are visible from Los Alamos, Jemez Springs, Jemez Pueblo, Albuquerque, Santa Fe and surrounding communities. Travel along Interstate 25, U.S. 550 and N.M. 4 may be impacted. Motorists are advised to proceed with caution when smoke limits visibility along their travel route.

If necessary, Sandoval County EOC Code Red Reverse 911 system will be utilized to distribute important safety messages specific to areas that could potentially be affected by the fire. For safety notifications in Sandoval County, sign up at http://www.sandovalcounty.com/.

Photo by Ryszard Wasilewski/jemezdailypost.com
 
Photo by Ryszard Wasilewski/jemezdailypost.com
 
Photo by Ryszard Wasilewski/jemezdailypost.com
CSTsiteisloaded