Science

Night With A Nerd Virtual Bingo – Binary Numbers

BSMA News:

The Bradbury Science Museum Association (BSMA) presents Night With a Nerd Virtual Bingo – Binary Numbers, 6-7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 13 via zoom video conferencing.

This virtual bingo game has STEM topics rather than numbers in the squares. For the binary numbers game – the squares will have the binary version and the decimal number will be called. 

Players will match to the binary numbers on their card. For example, if the number called is “65” the player would look for “1000001”.

Everyone can play. RSVP to the event to get a link to your bingo card sent to you on the day of the event. If you


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Megaripple Migration Offers Insights Into Martian Atmosphere

Large, bright-toned ripples in the sand within Proctor Crater on Mars. Courtesy/NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona

AGU News:

Scientists show for the first time that large sand ripples known as megaripples are migrating on Mars, according to a new study. The findings suggest Mars’s dusty surface might be much more active than previously suspected, offering clues about the Red Planet’s poorly understood atmosphere.

Sand dunes and ripples are typical features of deserts on both Earth and Mars. Megaripples are distinguished from smaller ripples by the coarser sand grains that gather


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LANL Builds SuperCam For Latest Mars Rover

A rendering of NASA’s Perseverance rover. Courtesy/NASA/JPL-Caltech

SuperCam Lead Scientist Roger Wiens

By BONNIE J. GORDON
Los Alamos Daily Post
bjgordon@ladailypost.com

Roger Wiens is Los Alamos National Laboratory’s lead scientist on SuperCam, the instrument that sits atop the new Mars Rover Perseverance. He spoke with the Los Alamos Daily Post Monday about LANL’s role developing Supercam and the mission of the new Mars rover. Perseverance launched this morning at 6 a.m. on its journey to Mars. It will land Feb.18, 2021.

Perseverance joins NASA’s Curiosity Rover, launched about


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University Of Arizona Health Sciences Researchers Narrow In On Novel Treatment For Alzheimer’s Disease

The University of Arizona College of Pharmacy in Tucson, Ariz. Courtesy photo

UA News:

TUCSON, Ariz. — A University of Arizona College of Pharmacy scientist has received $3.8 million in federal funding to continue research to develop medications to help prevent or reverse the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

Chris Hulme, PhD, professor of pharmacology and toxicology and a member of the college’s Arizona Center for Drug Discovery and the UArizona BIO5 Institute, is principal investigator for the five-year grant from the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes


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An Evening With NNSA’s Dr. Brent Park Thursday July 30

NATM News:

Join in at 6 p.m., 9 p.m., Thursday, July 30 for an evening with Dr. Brent Park, the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation.

Dr. Park, a nuclear physicist, with 30 years of experience at DOE National Laboratories, now leads NNSA’s efforts to prevent nuclear weapons proliferation and reduce the threat of nuclear and radiological terrorism around the world.

Register Now.

The museum is now open open four days a week! 10 a.m. – 3 p.m., Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday.

Book early! All tickets must be


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LANL: Simulating Quantum ‘Time Travel’ Disproves Butterfly Effect In Quantum Realm

In research by a team at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Alice prepares her qubit and applies the information scrambling unitary U to this and many other qubits altogether. Bob measures her qubit in any basis, flipping the qubit to the state not known to Alice. Alice still can reconstruct her information via a single decoding unitary U†. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Evolving quantum processes backwards on a quantum computer to damage information in the simulated past causes little change when returned to the ‘present’

Using a quantum computer to simulate time travel, researchers have demonstrated


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Los Alamos National Laboratory: New Mars Rover Tool Will Zap Rocks To Investigate Planet’s Past Habitability

The SuperCam instrument is attached to the Perseverance rover at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California in June 2019. Courtesy/NASA/JPL-Caltech

Roger Wiens leads the SuperCam team at Los Alamos National Laboratory. SuperCam is a tool that will go to Mars aboard NASA’s Perseverance rover to look for signs of past life on Mars. Courtesy/LANL 
LANL News:
  • Developed at LANL, SuperCam will examine the chemistry and mineralogy of rocks on Mars
When NASA’s Perseverance rover launches from Florida on its way to Mars, it will carry aboard what is likely the most versatile instrument ever made

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Strauss: Can We Predict The Expected Deaths From Covid-19 Three Weeks Ahead Of Time?

By CHARLIE STRAUSS
Los Alamos

Editor’s note: This article was received Thursday, July 23.

Because deaths from Covid-19 do not begin to appear until about three weeks after the disease’s symptoms appear, the numbers of deaths lag behind the numbers of cases. For this reason, one can expect to see more deaths than have been reported so far.

Forecasting is a risky business, and a wrong forecast can cause problems either by being too scary or downplaying things too much. Not to mention the soothsayer risks embarrassing ridicule. Instead, this article is about how to think about constructing a forecast.


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NIST Pioneering Research On Disinfection Of Drinking Water

A scientist places a water sample onto a custom-made platform. Each water sample contains microorganisms such as the parasite Giardia and adenoviruses, that can make humans sick. Courtesy/T. Larason/NIST

Courtesy/KOBU Agency/Unsplash

NIST News:

While awaiting full access to their labs due to COVID-19 restrictions, scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have taken this rare opportunity to report the technical details of pioneering research they conducted on the disinfection of drinking water using ultraviolet (UV) light.

Back in 2012, the NIST scientists


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Heinrich Provisions For New Mexico Military Installations, National Laboratories, Artificial Intelligence Clear Senate

U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich

U.S. SENATE News:

WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.), a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, Ranking Member of the Strategic Forces Subcommittee, and co-founder of the Senate Artificial Intelligence Caucus, voted Thursday for the fiscal year 2021 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).

The NDAA supports New Mexico’s men and women in uniform, military installations, national laboratories, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), Artificial Intelligence and job-creating initiatives throughout the state.

The bill passed the


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NIST Post-Quantum Cryptography Enters ‘Selection Round’

A select few algorithms, some of which fall into one of three mathematical ‘families’, are undergoing a final leg of review. Some will form the core of the first post-quantum cryptography standard. Courtesy/B. Hayes/NIST

NIST News:

The race to protect sensitive electronic information against the threat of quantum computers has entered the home stretch. 

After spending more than three years examining new approaches to encryption and data protection that could defeat an assault from a quantum computer, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has winnowed the 69 submissions


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EDD: Job Training Funds Support 120 New Trainees

Fabric test and production pods at Green Theme Technologies. Courtesy/EDD

Integrated Passive Device Matching Network from 3D Glass Solutions. Courtesy/EDD

EDD News:

SANTA FE — Nine companies were awarded funding for a total of 120 new trainees during the July meeting of the Job Training Incentive Program (JTIP) Board, Economic Development Department (EDD) Cabinet Secretary Alicia J. Keyes announced Tuesday.

Five of the JTIP applications were for new funding and four were amendments to previously awarded amounts, due to high rate of job expansion. The average wage of trainees at the July


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House Science, Space, And Technology Subcommittee Hears Luján Legislation To Spur Innovation; Leverage National Labs

U.S. Rep. Ben Ray Luján

From the Office of U.S. Rep. Ben Ray Luján:

NAMBÉ – Today, U.S. House Assistant Speaker Ben Ray Luján (D-N.M.) participated in a remote hearing of the House Science, Space, and Technology Subcommittee on Energy focused on the importance of promoting clean energy and building a strong and resilient economy.

The hearing considered three bills led by Luján to spur innovation and promote entrepreneurship and small business partnerships with National Laboratories.

“While all of us represent constituents, who are struggling to make ends meet, to pay rent, and provide for


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LANL, NNSA Honor 75th Anniversary Of Trinity Test

NNSA Administrator Lisa Gordon-Haggerty addresses media at a press event Thursday at the historic V-Site at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Courtesy/LANL

NNSA Administrator Lisa Gordon-Hagerty views artifacts from the Manhattan Project at the historic V-Site at LANL along with Director Thom Mason, center, and Rep. Ben Ray Luján. V-Site consisted of a cluster of wooden buildings built in January 1944 as a high explosives handling and assembly facility. Courtesy/LANL

By KIRSTEN LASKEY
Los Alamos Daily Post
kirsten@ladailypost.com

To mark the 75th anniversary of the testing of the nuclear


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AGU: Reduction In Commercial Flights Due To COVID-19 Leading To Less Accurate Weather Forecasts

A commercial airplane on a runway. Courtesy/Bilal EL-Daou from Pixabay

AGU News:

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Weather forecasts have become less accurate during the COVID-19 pandemic due to the reduction in commercial flights, according to new research.

A new study in AGU’s journal Geophysical Research Letters finds the world lost 50-75 percent of its aircraft weather observations between March and May of this year, when many flights were grounded due to the pandemic.

Aircraft typically inform weather forecasts by recording information about air temperature, relative humidity, air pressure


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LANL: Atomtronic Device Could Probe Boundary Between Quantum, Everyday Worlds

A schematic of an atomtronic SQUID shows semicircular traps that separate clouds of atoms, which quantum mechanically interfere when the device is rotated. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

A new device that relies on flowing clouds of ultracold atoms promises potential tests of the intersection between the weirdness of the quantum world and the familiarity of the macroscopic world experienced every day.

The atomtronic Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) also is potentially useful for ultrasensitive rotation measurements and as a component in quantum computers.

“In a conventional


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LANL Vs. COVID-19: Battling Virus On Three Fronts

National Security Sciences Building at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Courtesy/LANL

Kelly Beierschmitt

By BONNIE J. GORDON
Los Alamos Daily Post
bjgordon@ladailypost.com

It is common knowledge that Los Alamos National Laboratory is using science to fight COVID-19.

Its struggles to maintain a safe working environment for its staff and its efforts to help fellow New Mexicans cope with the impacts of the virus are less well known.

Safe Operations at LANL

LANL Deputy Director of Operations Kelly Beierschmitt spoke to the Los Alamos business community about LANL’s actions to protect its


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Space Exploration Moves From Sci-Fi Novel To Reality

Astronomer Rick Wallace hosted a virtual presentation on manned space exploration, as a part of ScienceFest, which concluded Sunday. Courtesy/PEEC

By KIRSTEN LASKEY
Los Alamos Daily Post
kirsten@ladailypost.com

Space tourism and colonization seems like the stuff of science fiction, but as retired Los Alamos National Laboratory employee Rick Wallace explained Friday night, it is quickly becoming a reality.

Wallace hosted a virtual presentation titled, The Future of Manned Space Exploration, as a part of ScienceFest, which concluded Sunday.

His presentation touched on space exploration’s


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LAAC Announces 20X20 ScienceFest Art Challenge Winners

The 20X20 ScienceFest Art Challenge first place winner in the teen category created by Elektra Caffrey. Courtesy/LAAC

The 20X20 ScienceFest Art Challenge first place winner in the adult category created by Renae Mitchell. Courtesy/LAAC

LAAC News:

Ten pieces of art lined the sidewalk July 7 through July 12 at Fuller Lodge Art Center.

The pieces were part of the Los Alamos Arts Council’s and Fuller Lodge Art Center’s 20X20 ScienceFest Art Challenge. The Los Alamos Creative District also contributed to the event.

Winners were selected in three categories:

  • Teen 1st Place- Elektra Caffrey, Teen

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STEM Virtual Space Camp With Spaceport America July 20-24

Spaceport America News:

SIERRA COUNTY – Spaceport America is hosting a free virtual space camp for children and parents to enrich at-home learning this summer.

The STEM with Spaceport America series blends arts and crafts with science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) experiments.

The camp will feature Spaceport America’s new STEM mascots “Spirit and Sky”. The series has been made available to the New Mexico Public Education Department for virtual learning resources for the fall.

“With the current COVID-19 Safer at Home restrictions, many families won’t be taking their


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