Robinson: Why Should I support The Rec Bond?

By JAMES ROBINSON
Los Alamos

Today, the ballots for the Recreation bond will be mailed out, and Los Alamos will be tasked with deciding whether or not it wants to invest in its future or stay in the past.

With their vote, money can be invested in modern infrastructure that could stimulate demand in our town beyond our national laboratory for the first time in decades, or keep things the same.

Our wonderful golf course was the gift of the United States government almost 70 years ago, and have a irrigation system to match. My family has been around Los Alamos since the early 60s and to them, not much has changed. My father remembers playing on the ball fields on North Mesa when he was 11, and was happy when Overlook was built and he could play baseball in White Rock.Then, around the time I was born, the county completed construction of the Larry R. Walkup pool. One of the largest pools at our elevation in the world.

Since then, there has been little investment in recreation beyond tennis courts and the amazing work of our open space maintenance of our trails. And as we have seen, Los Alamos has been getting older and younger families are opting to live in Santa Fe where there is plenty to do during the inclement time.

Now, I will be the first to admit that there is some risk involved with this bond. There is always going to be risk with any kind of investment. However, the opportunity for this community out weighs the risk. To me, this is a scene right out of the movie Field of Dreams.

With this investment, our community could not only generate more interest in our county to hold tournament level events, but also bring the sweet flow of cash to our hotels and restaurants that follows those games.

With more demand, our county could finally begin attracting more hotels to build up here to meet a growing demand, which in turn will fill our lodgers tax coffers. In addition, with the opening of new tracts of land, the county could attract more developers to finally bring some modern housing to Los Alamos, and fill those new houses with young families.

So, as you open your ballot this week, please consider where you want to see Los Alamos in the next decade. We could easily be the same, our town hasn’t changed much in 70 years. Or we could take this time to bring something new to our town, and then reap the rewards.

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