Los Alamos ‘Ride of Silence’ Honors the Fallen

Los Alamos Police Ofc. David Boe joined other cyclists at Wednesday’s ‘Ride of Silence’ event that began at Ashley Pond. Photo by Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com

Cyclists gather around Lili Cohen, center, local ‘Ride of Silence’ organizer, as she details the 7-mile ride they are about to take. Photo by Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com

Staff Report

Wednesday’s Los Alamos “Ride of Silence” drew some 30 cyclists who gathered at 6:30 p.m. at Ashley Pond were they formed a silent procession to honor cyclists who have been killed or injured while cycling on public roadways.

Lili Cohen organized the event, which is a quiet, slow paced requiem for the fallen riders. Cyclists ride no faster than 12 mph, wear helmets, follow the rules of the road and remain silent during the 7-mile ride.

This is the 10th anniversary of the world-wide event, which begins each year in North America and rolls out across the globe. In 2003, Chris Phelan organized the first Ride of Silence in Dallas after endurance cyclist Larry Schwartz was hit by the mirror of a passing bus and was killed. Although cyclists have a legal right to share the road with motorists, the motoring public often isn’t aware of these rights, and sometimes not aware of the cyclists themselves.

In adddition to honoring the fallen, the ride, held during May for National Bike Month, aims to raise the awareness of motorists, police and city officials that cyclists have a legal right to the public roadways.

Photo by Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com

Photo by Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com

Photo by Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com

Photo by Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com

Photo by Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com

 

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