Learn About Henna Tattoo At Art On Tap Thursday

Henna tattooing on a hand by Heather Beemer. Courtesy/FLAC

FLAC News:

Using henna for body art has been practiced for more than 5,000 years.

The intricate designs can symbolize passages of life and are also applied simply for their beauty. Getting a henna tattoo is preferred by many people over a traditional tattoo because it is not painful and it is not permanent.

At Art on Tap Thursday May 7, Heather Beemer will share some cultural and historical information about henna, talk about how she mixes the henna she uses and answer questions. She may even apply some henna tattoos once participants get the discussion rolling.

Heather Beemer has been intrigued with henna for many years. By career she is a speech-language pathologist but she still finds time to placate her artistic side by doing henna tattoos on people at events and painting henna designs on objects like candles and skulls. She named her henna business “Hippie Chique.” Visit her website at  http://www.hippiechiquehenna.com/.

“Over the years I have developed a passion and more of an understanding of the art itself, in turn, urging me to change the name of my small business to Shringar, a term used to represent the beauty of a woman,” Beemer said. “This beauty can be expressed through creative expression, a gesture, something she puts into a work of art, adornments, and my favorite, the beauty of a woman beneath the surface. Please join me on May 7 to learn more about this ancient art and allow me to share something that brings me great joy. Let’s celebrate change and toast to the new Shringar Mehndi. Let’s share the beauty together.”

Join Fuller Lodge Art Center staff at Unquarked Wine Room 5-7:30 p.m., Thursday for Art on Tap and maybe you’ll go home with a henna tattoo!

 
‘Dream Maker’ by Heather Beemer. Courtesy/FLAC

 

Shoulder henna tattoo. Courtesy/FLAC

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