Get Your Adrenaline Pumping With LALT’s The Woman in Black

Rehearsal scenes from The Woman in Black, which opens Friday at the Los Alamos Little Theater. Photo by TK Thompson/ladailypost.com

By Bonnie Gordon

‘Tis the season to be scary and the new play at Los Alamos Little Theater (LALT) will do the job nicely.

“The Woman in Black,” adapted from the book by Susan Hill by Stephen Mallatratt, premiered in 1987 and has been running steadily on the London stage since 1989.

Many people have seen the 2012 movie version starring Daniel Radcliffe.

The play opens in a small Victorian theatre. Arthur Kipps, a middle-aged solicitor, has hired a theatre and the services of a professional actor to help him re-enact, and thereby hopefully exorcise, terrifying events which befell him many years before.

The action proceeds as a play within a play.

Photo by TK Thompson/ladailypost.com

Director Laurie Tomlinson said the play was suggested to her by her daughter. When a friend told her that seeing “The Woman in Black” was “the most frightening experience she’d ever had at the theatre,” Tomlinson was sold.

“I thought the play would be a good draw for middle and high school students,” Tomlinson said.

The play relies on two actors, Warren Houghteling as the middle-aged Kipps, who enacts all of the parts in the play, with the exception of himself as a young man, and Patrick Webb who appears in the role of the young actor playing the younger Kipps.

“It’s very challenging for the actors because they have so many lines,” Tomlinson said. “Warren has to do a lot of characterizations and a number of different accents.”

Tomlinson has directed the last three Los Alamos Light Operas as well as “Spitfire Grill” at LALT. She often teams up with Gretchen Amstutz on theater projects. Amstutz produced “The Woman in Black.”

“There are so many great people involved in the show,” Tomlinson said.

Scary sets built by master carpenter Larry Cox, and creepy sound and lighting by Grady Hughes and Ken Milder respectively, help set the mood.

How about the play’s namesake, The Woman in Black? She’s a mystery. No actor is named in the program.

“We want people to leave the theater wondering, was she a woman or was she a ghost?” Tomlinson said.

The Woman in Black opens at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 2 and will run Friday and Saturday evenings at that time for three weekends.

There also will be a Sunday matinee at 2 p.m., Nov. 11.

Tickets are $12 for adults and $10 for students and seniors. They can be purchased at CB FOX or at the door the night of each performance.

To read the latest LALT Newsletter and to learn more about “Woman in Black,” visit www.lalt.org.

Actors Warren Houghteling, left, and Patrick Webb. Photo by TK Thompson/ladailypost.com

Photo by TK Thompson/ladailypost.com

Photo by TK Thompson/ladailypost.com

Photo by TK Thompson/ladailypost.com

Photo by TK Thompson/ladailypost.com

Director Laurie Tomlinson discusses a que in the script. Photo by TK Thompson/ladailypost.com

 

 

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