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AGU: Earthquake In 2009 Intensifies American Samoa’s Rising Sea Levels

on June 5, 2019 - 7:00am
Crews working near the damage from the 2009 tsunami in American Samoa. Courtesy/Lorn Cramer/Flickr, Wikimedia Commons
 
 
AGU News:
 
The 2009, magnitude-8.1 Samoa earthquake dealt a great deal of damage to the Samoan Islands: Tsunami waves as high as 14 meters (46 feet) wiped out multiple villages, claiming nearly 200 lives and severely damaging water and electrical systems.
 
New research reveals the damage is likely to continue in the island Tutuila, also known as American Samoa.

Local LDS Relief Society Assists Women Across Globe

on June 3, 2019 - 4:17pm
Members of the LDS Church Relief Society create flannel liners to donate to Days for Girls and Women 2 Be. Courtesy photo
 
By KIRSTEN LASKEY
Los Alamos Daily Post

For many women around the world, menstruation can be a humiliating or physically painful experience because they don’t have any resources to help manage their flow.

According to the Days for Girls website, for many young women in rural areas or developing countries, getting their period forces them to miss school or prevents them from graduating.

World Futures: Profit, Non-Profit, Not-For-Profit Part 3

on June 3, 2019 - 4:02pm
By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute
 
In the previous article we explored profit making businesses as bubbles in society and concluded that they possibly could be non-profit organizations if they lose money.
 
If that is the case, they usually do not have to pay taxes, at least not on profits. But used in this sense the term “non-profit” is a misleading adjective in the legal sense. The use of the term has a governmental connotation, obviously making it ambiguous.

A non-profit, as commonly used, is a non-business activity or a not-for-profit organization or institution.

Griggs: World Water Summit 11 In Hamburg, Germany

on June 3, 2019 - 8:39am
Handwerkskammer. Courtesy/Wikipedia
 
By DAVID GRIGGS
Global Correspondent
Los Alamos Daily Post
 
After months of silence, your bearded correspondent finally surfaces in Hamburg, Germany. Today I attended World Water Summit 11, organized by the Water & Sanitation Rotarian Action Group.
 
WASRAG was formed in 2007 by a group of Rotarians. Since then it has facilitated many hundreds of projects – helping clubs find partners, ensuring sustainability, stressing the importance of a needs-driven approach, and developing best practices.
 
They encourage a holistic, integrated approach in which water

Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham Responds To President Trump’s Threat To Increase Tariffs On Mexico

on May 31, 2019 - 11:50am
 

Fact sheet detailing figures concerning New Mexico's trade relationship with Mexico. Courtesy/Governor's Office

From the Office of Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham:

 

SANTA FE – Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham today issued the following statement in response to President Donald Trump’s announcement that his administration would impose escalating tariffs on Mexican imports until “illegal” migrants are stopped from arriving at the southern U.S. border:
 
“The president is threatening the employment of tens of thousands of New Mexicans whose livelihoods and families absolutely depend on a

Pajarito Astronomers Host Dark Night Saturday June 1

on May 31, 2019 - 11:33am

Pajarito Astronomers News:

The Pajarito Astronomers will be holding a County-Sponsored Dark Night starting at 8:15 p.m. (sunset) Saturday, June 1 at Spirio Soccer Field, Overlook Park in White Rock.

Weather permitting, the public is invited to come out, wander among the telescopes, and star gaze. The planets Mercury, Mars, Jupiter (with its moons) and Saturn will potentially be visible during the evening.

There will be a tour of the spring and summer constellations and there will be telescope views of double stars, star clusters, nebulae and galaxies.

The public is invited and encouraged

FBI: Former LANL Scientist Charged With Making False Official Statements About His Contacts And Involvement With A Chinese Government Program

on May 30, 2019 - 4:58pm

FBI News:

ALBUQUERQUE – Turab Lookman, 67, of Santa Fe, made an initial appearance in federal court today on charges of making false official statements about his involvement with a program established by the Chinese government to recruit people with access to and knowledge of foreign technology and intellectual property.

The FBI arrested Lookman yesterday after a grand jury indicted him on Wednesday on three counts of making false official statements about being recruited by and applying to participate in China’s Thousand Talents Program for personal compensation.

The indictment alleges that

U.S. Sen. Tom Udall Statement On Special Counsel Mueller’s Public Remarks About Russia Investigation

on May 30, 2019 - 8:42am
U.S. Sen. Tom Udall
 
U.S. SENATE News:
 
WASHIGNTON, D.C. Wednesday, U.S. Sen. Tom Udall issued the following statement after Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s public remarks regarding the Russia investigation:
 
“Today, Robert Mueller made two things crystal clear. First, a foreign adversary meddled in our presidential election with the express intention of tipping the scales to benefit the Trump campaign. Second, the special counsel was unable to charge the president with obstruction of justice solely due to Department of Justice policy -- not lack of evidence.

Rotary: Veteran Mike Katko On The Poetry Of War

on May 30, 2019 - 6:18am

Veteran and Los Alamos Rotarian Mike Katko recently presented a program at the Rotary Club of Los Alamos in honor of Memorial Day. Entitled ‘The Poetry of War’, Katko read poetry inspired by the tragedy of battlefields of the Civil War, the World Wars and Vietnam. With primarily black-and-white photographs as a backdrop, he also added period music with powerful wartime lyrics. At the conclusion of his presentation, Katko asked members to share the names of veterans who had been important in their lives. Photo by John McHale/ladailypost.com

Los Alamos National Laboratory: Quantum Information Gets Boost From Thin-Film Breakthrough

on May 29, 2019 - 11:00am

An innovative method for controlling single-photon emission for specific locations in 2D materials may offer a new path toward all-optical quantum computers and other quantum technologies. This image shows a false-color scanning electron micrograph of the array used to create place single-photon sources in epitaxial tungsten diselenide. Inset shows the Hanbury-Brown Twiss interferometry measurement proving quantum emission. Image by Michael Pettes/Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Method opens new path to all-optical quantum computers, other technologies

 

Efforts to create reliable light-based

Former Ice Caps Buried Under North Polar Ice On Mars

on May 28, 2019 - 5:59am
A view of Mars showing the planet’s northern polar ice cap. A new study led by The University of Texas at Austin has found remnants of ancient ice caps buried in the north polar region. Courtesy/ISRO / ISSDC / Emily Lakdawalla.
 
A vertically exaggerated view of Mars’ north polar cap. Researchers estimate that if melted, the massive ice deposits discovered in this region would cover the planet in 1.5 meters (5 feet) of water. Courtesy/SA/DLR/FU Berlin; NASA MGS MOLA Science Team.
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C.

RSF: Hong Kong Must Abandon Extradition Bill That Threatens Journalists And Their Sources

on May 27, 2019 - 5:57am
Courtesy photo
 
RSF News:
 
Reporters Without Borders (RSF) urges Hong Kong Legislative Council members to reject extradition bill that would allow Beijing to legally prey on residents and visitors, including journalists and their sources.
 
By July, Hong Kong’s Legislative Council (LegCo) could amend its extradition law, making it legal to hand over residents or visitors accused of a crime in China.
 
The news has generated extreme concern in the Hong Kong media community, considering that more than 65 journalists are currently jailed in China in life-threatening conditions. While

Barranca Elementary School 4th Grade Student Aditya Viswanathan Winner Of Ranger Rick Photo Contest

on May 26, 2019 - 7:14am

Barranca Elementary School fourth grade student Aditya Viswanathan is one of the winners of the 2019 Ranger Rick photo contest. He took this photo of a mother leopard climbing down a tree at the Masai Mara National Reserve in Kenya when he was 8 years old on safari with his family in June 2017. A leopard is one of the more difficult animals to see and Aditya managed to capture this fleeting moment nicely framed between the trunks of acacia trees. Look closely and see some blood on her paw since she was feeding at the wildebeest kill she had stashed up in the tree. Courtesy photo

RSF Urges China To Release Journalist Reporting On Political Prisoners

on May 25, 2019 - 5:48am
Chinese citizen-journalist Ma Xiao arrested for ‘picking quarrels and stirring up trouble’ in China. Courtesy/RSF
 
RSF News:
 
Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls for the release of Ma Xiao, a Chinese citizen-journalist who published a series of political prisoners’ interviews and has been detained for a month.
 
Beijing-based citizen-journalist Xie Qiang, known under the pen name of Ma Xiao, was arrested on April 27 for “picking quarrels and stirring up trouble,” a deliberately vague charge used by the Chinese regime to silence critics. Ma is a contributor to US-based website

World Futures: Profit, Non-Profit, Not-For-Profit Part 2

on May 23, 2019 - 7:07am
By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute
 
Previously we looked at individual bubbles in a bubble model with the definitive statements that they want and need to make a profit.

They need compensation, usually money, so that they can acquire other things for survival and ride the elevator of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.

They want to avoid pain while seeking pleasure. Profit, as used here, means making a living or money by producing or buying or selling goods and services.

An individual selling his or her labor (getting a job) is in the business of him or herself, with most of the

Explore Asteroids Friday; Saturday In Planetarium

on May 23, 2019 - 6:03am
Explore the risks asteroids pose to Earth and what mankind might be able to do about them Friday and Saturday at the Los Alamos Nature Center. Local asteroid expert Galen Gisler will lead a talk at 6 p.m. Friday, May 24, and the nature center will show the full-dome film 'Incoming!' at 2 p.m. Saturday, May 25. Courtesy/PEEC
 
PEEC News:
 
Explore the risks asteroid impacts pose to the Earth this Friday and Saturday at the Los Alamos Nature Center’s planetarium.

Giant Impact Caused Difference In Moon’s Hemispheres

on May 21, 2019 - 7:19am
Artist’s depiction of a collision between two planetary bodies. New research suggests the stark difference between the Moon’s heavily-cratered farside and the lower-lying open basins of the nearside were caused by a wayward dwarf planet colliding with the Moon in the early history of the solar system. Courtesy/NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — The stark difference between the Moon’s heavily-cratered farside and the lower-lying open basins of the Earth-facing nearside has puzzled scientists for decades.
 
Now, new evidence about the Moon’s crust suggests the differences

Senate Intel Committee Passes 2020 Intelligence Authorization Act

on May 19, 2019 - 6:50am
U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich
 
U.S. SENATE News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. This week, U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.) voted to advance the Damon Paul Nelson and Matthew Young Pollard Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Years 2018, 2019 and 2020.
 
This legislation, which unanimously passed the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, authorizes funding for key intelligence priorities, including programs to address threats emanating from Russia, North Korea, China, and Iran, and enhances congressional oversight of the U.S. Intelligence Community.
 
Sen.

Daily Postcard: Full Flower Blue Moon Spotted Saturday

on May 19, 2019 - 6:10am

This shot of the Full Flower Blue Moon was taken about 3:40 a.m. Saturday in White Rock. A Blue Moon rarely appears blue in the sky, and the name actually has little to do with its color. Usually, a full moon occurs just once a month. Sometimes—about every three years or so—one month will have two full moons. This phenomenon is what is called a Calendrical Blue Moon. But that's not the case this May. According to the Farmers' Almanac, each of the four seasons typically contains three full moons. However, sometimes a season will have four.

AGU: Study Finds 24 Percent Of West Antarctic Ice Is Now Unstable

on May 18, 2019 - 10:34am
An iceberg at Marguerite Bay on the Antarctic Peninsula. New research finds 24 percent of West Antarctic ice is now unstable. Courtesy/Andrew Shepherd
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — In only 25 years, ocean melting has caused ice thinning to spread across West Antarctica so rapidly that a quarter of its glacier ice is now affected, according to a new study.
 
Scientists at the Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling (CPOM), based at the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom, have combined 25 years of European Space Agency satellite altimeter measurements and a model of

World Futures: Profit, Non-Profit, Not-for-Profit – Part 1

on May 16, 2019 - 6:55am
By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute
 
Inferring from the title, one might anticipate this series is about businesses. It is and it is not.
 
It is in that as humanity developed, trade became essential. It is not because humanity has a need to survive and that requires working together in an “organized” manner. Perhaps this is better visualized with the bubble model I am fond of.

Checking today, there are 7.7 billion living people on the world. These are individual bubbles bouncing around with dependence on other bubbles and the “fluid” they are in.

RSF Welcomes Investigation Into Chinese State Television Network CGTN For Airing Forced Confessions

on May 16, 2019 - 6:51am
Former British journalist and private investigator Peter Humphrey was detained in China in 2013 and forced to confess to alleged crimes on air in 2014. Courtesy/RSF
 
RSF News:
 
RSF welcomes the launch of an investigation by the United Kingdom’s audiovisual regulation authority (Ofcom) on Chinese state television network CGTN for airing forced confessions.
 
The United Kingdom’s Office of Communications (Ofcom) announced May 9 that they are investigating China Global Television Network’s (CGTN) possible violation of broadcasting regulations.

Los Alamos Rotary Youth Exchange Student Lisa Schutt Of Switzerland Presents Program On Academic Year

on May 16, 2019 - 6:35am

Youth Exchange student Lisa Schutt of Switzerland, sponsored by the Rotary Club of Los Alamos, presented a program May 14 about her academic year at Los Alamos High School as it now comes to an end. She will return home to Maeinfeld in three weeks. Schutt said that highlights of her year here included making so many new friends in Los Alamos and through Rotary Youth Exchange activities across the state, visiting the Grand Canyon and San Diego, attending Homecoming and being on the Rotary Club float in the parade, and discovering breakfast burritos. Based upon school requirements in

La Niña’s Effect On Droughts Traced To U.S. Civil War

on May 16, 2019 - 6:17am
Max Torbenson coring a bristlecone pine in central Colorado. Photo by Daniel Griffin
 
AGU News:
 
Cyclical variations in wind and sea surface temperatures in the Pacific Ocean may have contributed to a drought that played an important role in the outcome of the U.S. Civil War, according to a new study.
 
The new research used tree ring data to reconstruct the influence of El Niño and La Niña conditions on droughts across North America for the past 350 years, including during the American Civil War.
 
The Civil War drought – one of the worst to afflict the U.S.

LANL Director Emeritus Terry Wallace Traces Gold’s Cosmic Journey In Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Los Alamos

on May 15, 2019 - 11:28am

Terry Wallace

LANL News:

  • From stars to the Amazon, free lectures explore the story of gold

 

Los Alamos National Laboratory Director Emeritus Terry Wallace will discuss the cosmic and tectonic journey made by the metal gold in three Frontiers in Science public lectures beginning May 20 in Albuquerque. 

 

“Gold is one of the most fascinating of the 4,500 mineral species on Earth, and no mineral (or metal) evokes more emotion,” said geologist Wallace.

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