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Giant Impact Caused Difference In Moon’s Hemispheres

on May 21, 2019 - 7:19am
Artist’s depiction of a collision between two planetary bodies. New research suggests the stark difference between the Moon’s heavily-cratered farside and the lower-lying open basins of the nearside were caused by a wayward dwarf planet colliding with the Moon in the early history of the solar system. Courtesy/NASA/JPL-Caltech
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — The stark difference between the Moon’s heavily-cratered farside and the lower-lying open basins of the Earth-facing nearside has puzzled scientists for decades.
 
Now, new evidence about the Moon’s crust suggests the differences

Senate Intel Committee Passes 2020 Intelligence Authorization Act

on May 19, 2019 - 6:50am
U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich
 
U.S. SENATE News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. This week, U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.) voted to advance the Damon Paul Nelson and Matthew Young Pollard Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Years 2018, 2019 and 2020.
 
This legislation, which unanimously passed the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, authorizes funding for key intelligence priorities, including programs to address threats emanating from Russia, North Korea, China, and Iran, and enhances congressional oversight of the U.S. Intelligence Community.
 
Sen.

Daily Postcard: Full Flower Blue Moon Spotted Saturday

on May 19, 2019 - 6:10am

This shot of the Full Flower Blue Moon was taken about 3:40 a.m. Saturday in White Rock. A Blue Moon rarely appears blue in the sky, and the name actually has little to do with its color. Usually, a full moon occurs just once a month. Sometimes—about every three years or so—one month will have two full moons. This phenomenon is what is called a Calendrical Blue Moon. But that's not the case this May. According to the Farmers' Almanac, each of the four seasons typically contains three full moons. However, sometimes a season will have four.

AGU: Study Finds 24 Percent Of West Antarctic Ice Is Now Unstable

on May 18, 2019 - 10:34am
An iceberg at Marguerite Bay on the Antarctic Peninsula. New research finds 24 percent of West Antarctic ice is now unstable. Courtesy/Andrew Shepherd
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — In only 25 years, ocean melting has caused ice thinning to spread across West Antarctica so rapidly that a quarter of its glacier ice is now affected, according to a new study.
 
Scientists at the Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling (CPOM), based at the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom, have combined 25 years of European Space Agency satellite altimeter measurements and a model of

World Futures: Profit, Non-Profit, Not-for-Profit – Part 1

on May 16, 2019 - 6:55am
By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute
 
Inferring from the title, one might anticipate this series is about businesses. It is and it is not.
 
It is in that as humanity developed, trade became essential. It is not because humanity has a need to survive and that requires working together in an “organized” manner. Perhaps this is better visualized with the bubble model I am fond of.

Checking today, there are 7.7 billion living people on the world. These are individual bubbles bouncing around with dependence on other bubbles and the “fluid” they are in.

RSF Welcomes Investigation Into Chinese State Television Network CGTN For Airing Forced Confessions

on May 16, 2019 - 6:51am
Former British journalist and private investigator Peter Humphrey was detained in China in 2013 and forced to confess to alleged crimes on air in 2014. Courtesy/RSF
 
RSF News:
 
RSF welcomes the launch of an investigation by the United Kingdom’s audiovisual regulation authority (Ofcom) on Chinese state television network CGTN for airing forced confessions.
 
The United Kingdom’s Office of Communications (Ofcom) announced May 9 that they are investigating China Global Television Network’s (CGTN) possible violation of broadcasting regulations.

Los Alamos Rotary Youth Exchange Student Lisa Schutt Of Switzerland Presents Program On Academic Year

on May 16, 2019 - 6:35am

Youth Exchange student Lisa Schutt of Switzerland, sponsored by the Rotary Club of Los Alamos, presented a program May 14 about her academic year at Los Alamos High School as it now comes to an end. She will return home to Maeinfeld in three weeks. Schutt said that highlights of her year here included making so many new friends in Los Alamos and through Rotary Youth Exchange activities across the state, visiting the Grand Canyon and San Diego, attending Homecoming and being on the Rotary Club float in the parade, and discovering breakfast burritos. Based upon school requirements in

La Niña’s Effect On Droughts Traced To U.S. Civil War

on May 16, 2019 - 6:17am
Max Torbenson coring a bristlecone pine in central Colorado. Photo by Daniel Griffin
 
AGU News:
 
Cyclical variations in wind and sea surface temperatures in the Pacific Ocean may have contributed to a drought that played an important role in the outcome of the U.S. Civil War, according to a new study.
 
The new research used tree ring data to reconstruct the influence of El Niño and La Niña conditions on droughts across North America for the past 350 years, including during the American Civil War.
 
The Civil War drought – one of the worst to afflict the U.S.

LANL Director Emeritus Terry Wallace Traces Gold’s Cosmic Journey In Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Los Alamos

on May 15, 2019 - 11:28am

Terry Wallace

LANL News:

  • From stars to the Amazon, free lectures explore the story of gold

 

Los Alamos National Laboratory Director Emeritus Terry Wallace will discuss the cosmic and tectonic journey made by the metal gold in three Frontiers in Science public lectures beginning May 20 in Albuquerque. 

 

“Gold is one of the most fascinating of the 4,500 mineral species on Earth, and no mineral (or metal) evokes more emotion,” said geologist Wallace.

NM Delegation: Reimburse Border Communities Providing Humanitarian Relief To Asylum Seekers

on May 15, 2019 - 7:25am
 
CONGRESSIONAL DELEGATION News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. After reports that U.S. Border Patrol has in recent weeks released more than 4,000 migrants applying for asylum in the United States in Las Cruces, U.S. Senators Tom Udall (D-N.M.) and Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.) Tuesday sent a letter with U.S.

Scenes From 15th Annual Japanese Cultural Festival

on May 15, 2019 - 6:33am
Santa Fe Japanese Intercultural Network President Casey Janes at the 15th annual Japanese Cultural Festival May 11 at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center. The event included food and wares, entertainment and kid’s activities. Coordinated by Janes, the theme for this year was Japanese Folktales and the cultural values passed down through the ages in both oral and written traditions. Photo by Tammy Jimines
 
Japanese Cultural Festival Family. Photo by Tammy Jimines

Dragon Green. Photo by Tammy Jimines

Dragon White. Photo by Tammy Jimines

Dragon Red. Photo by Tammy Jimines

U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich Statement On Secretary Mike Pompeo Meeting With Vladimir Putin

on May 13, 2019 - 5:30pm

U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich

From the Office of U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich:

WASHINGTON, D.C. – After a “sweeping and systemic” disinformation campaign directed by Russian President Vladimir Putin to undermine the 2016 elections, and recent warnings from FBI Director Christopher Wray that the United States should be prepared for another attack on the election systems in 2020, U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.), a member of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, issued the following statement ahead of Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s Tuesday meeting with President Putin:

“If Secretary

Alex Kirk Ices Two Free-Throws To Seal Alvark Title

on May 11, 2019 - 12:08pm

Los Alamos High School graduate and basketball star Alex Kirk with his father Alan Kirk  Friday in Yokohama Japan as the Alvark Tokyo team repeats as champions of the Japanese B. League after beating the Chiba Jets in the championship game 71-67. Kirk iced two free-throws with 11 seconds left to seal the back-to-back title for Alvark and secure a second consecutive trip to the FIBA Asia Champions Cup later this year. Courtesy photo

SPORTS News:

Los Alamos High School graduate and basketball star Alex Kirk play on the Alvark Tokyo team, which Friday repeated their win of the Japanese B.

AGU: Climate Change Gives Old Trees Growth Spurt

on May 10, 2019 - 6:17pm
A graph of Dahurian larch tree growth from 1964-2014. BAI stands for basal area increment – the amount of area the trees gained in cross-section each year, in square millimeters. The lines represent average growth for trees of different age groups (150 to 200 years old, 200 to 250 years old, 250 to 300 years old, and older than 300 years). The spike in growth around 2004 is evident. Courtesy/AGU/Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences
 

Tree rings collected from old-growth Dahurian larch trees. Trees grow one ring per year. Courtesy/Xianliang Zhang
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C.

Udall, Warren, Harris, Blumenthal To DHS: Stop Unconstitutional Surveillance Of Journalists, Activists...

on May 10, 2019 - 10:48am

U.S. SENATE News:
  • Senators demand answers from Acting Secretary McAleenan about CBP’s program to target and monitor individuals reporting on or providing assistance to migrants at the border

WASHINGTON – Today, U.S. Senators Tom Udall (D-N.M.), Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), Kamala D. Harris (D-Calif.) and Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) wrote to U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Acting Secretary Kevin K.

AGU: Radioactive Carbon From Nuclear Bomb Tests Found In Deep Ocean Trenches

on May 9, 2019 - 8:48am
Hirondellea gigas, a type of amphipod that lives in the Mariana Trench. Courtesy/Daiju Azuma, CC BY 2.5
 
The 37 kiloton “Priscilla” nuclear test, detonated at the Nevada Test Site in 1957. Courtesy/U.S. Department of Energy
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Radioactive carbon released into the atmosphere from 20th-century nuclear bomb tests has reached the deepest parts of the ocean, new research finds.
 
A new study in AGU’s journal Geophysical Research Letters finds the first evidence of radioactive carbon from nuclear bomb tests in muscle tissues of crustaceans that inhabit Earth’s

Global Probe Into Dark Web Drug Ops Nets Arrests

on May 6, 2019 - 10:19am
DEA News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. After a two-year investigation into one of the world’s largest dark web marketplaces, the DEA and other law enforcement partners have announced the arrests of three German nationals who operated the site, which sold illegal drugs and other goods to more than a million customers.
 
The three defendants were arrested April 23-24 in the United States and Germany and now face charges in both countries for their roles as administrators of the Wall Street Marketplace (WSM). (German charges:

World Futures: Integrity – Part Four

on May 5, 2019 - 6:34am
By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute
 
In the previous column we examined deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), the coding used to support all life on earth as we know it.
 
It controls the living organism, its functioning in the environment, and contains information about functioning.

Los Alamos Quadrumaniacs Robotics Team Qualifies For International Competition In West Virginia

on May 2, 2019 - 9:45am

The Quadrumaniacs with their robot, from left, Zoya Kahn, Timothy Rousculp, Sasha Simakov, Magellon Bronson and Lucy Kelley. Members Corben Meek and Maggie Kelley are not pictured.  Photo by Bonnie J. Gordon/ladailypost.com

By BONNIE J. GORDON
Los Alamos Daily Post

bjgordon@ladailypost.com

The story of how the Quadrumanics got their name tells you something about the team. The name comes from quadrumana, primates with four hands. Probably, most people reading this didn’t know that, but the team did.

EM Assistant Secretary Anne White Tours WIPP, LANL Projects, Meets With Workers

on May 1, 2019 - 10:56am
EM Assistant Secretary Anne White joins waste management staff from Newport News Nuclear BWXT-Los Alamos at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to mark the second shipment of transuranic waste from LANL’s Area G to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant this year. Courtesy photo
 
EM Assistant Secretary Anne White meets with early career professionals during a visit to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant last week. Courtesy photo
 
WIPP News:
 
EM Assistant Secretary Anne White visited the cleanup program's New Mexico sites last week.
 
Following is her report on the trip:
 
I had a

SFCIR Presents Dr. Donald Hinsman On State Of Global Climate May 6

on May 1, 2019 - 10:34am
SFCIR News:
 
The Santa Fe Council on International Relations (SFCIR) is hosting a presentation by Dr. Donald Hinsman, a former World Meteorological Organization (WMO) director of the World Weather Watch, the Global Climate Observing System and the WMO Space Programme.
 
Dr. Hinsman's presentation is 10 a.m. to noon Monday, May 6 at SFCIR, 413 Grant Ave, Suite D will cover the State of the Global Climate during 2017 and 2018 as described in the WMO’s Annual Statements on Global Climate.
 
The World Meteorological Organization is a member of the United Nations System and is its

State, City Of Albuquerque Open Facilities At Expo New Mexico To Assist Asylum-Seeking Families

on May 1, 2019 - 8:25am
STATE News:
 
ALBUQUERQUE Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham and Mayor Tim Keller Tuesday announced a partnership aimed at alleviating some of the pressure in New Mexico’s southern border communities, particularly Las Cruces, which has developed as a result of federal agents transporting an increasing number of asylum-seeking migrant families to the city.
 
Existing dormitories located at Expo New Mexico, a state facility, will be opened to provide temporary accommodations for some of these families.

RSF: Labor Rights Journalists Feared To Be Victims Of Torture In China

on May 1, 2019 - 8:17am
Two of three labour journalists detained earlier this year in Guangzhou were placed April 20 under a special detention system often associated with torture. Courtesy/RSF
 
RSF News:

 

Wei Zhili and Ke Chengbing, both editors of labor rights news outlet iLabour.net who were arrested in March in the south-eastern Chinese city of Guangzhou, have been under “residential surveillance at a designated location” (RSDL) since Saturday, April 20, according to their families.

 
This detention system, that is supposed to handle individuals who pose a threat to national security, deprives

Scientists Track Giant Ocean Vortex From Space

on May 1, 2019 - 7:46am

Researchers have found a new way to use satellites to monitor the Great Whirl. Courtesy/AGU

AGU News:

WASHINGTON—Researchers have found a new way to use satellites to monitor the Great Whirl, a massive whirlpool the size of Colorado that forms each year off the coast of East Africa, they report in a new study.

Using 23 years of satellite data, the new findings show the Great Whirl is larger and longer-lived than scientists previously thought.

LANL: SuperCam One Step Closer To Mars

on April 30, 2019 - 8:14am

The SuperCam has completed testing and evaluation at LANL and is on its way to JPL for full system integration. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

The SuperCam instrument – designed, built and tested at Los Alamos National Laboratory in partnership with the French Space Agency – and destined for the exploration of Mars – has completed testing and evaluation at Los Alamos and is on its way to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California for full system integration. 

The SuperCam instruments left Los Alamos Monday, April 29. SuperCam will be one of two* Los Alamos instruments on the next rover, called

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