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AAUW-NM Announces First Mission In Action Award

on May 2, 2017 - 6:31am

Dr. Tinka Gammel, left, representing the New Mexico Network of Women in Science in Engineering receives the Mission in Action Award from AAUW-NM Awards Chair Sheila Portillo at AAUW’s annual state convention Saturday evening in Los Alamos. Courtesy/AAUW-NM

AAUW-NM News:

AAUW-New Mexico has announced that the New Mexico Network for Women in Science and Engineering (the Network) is the first recipient of its Mission In Action Award.

Awards Chair Sheila Portillo presented the award Saturday evening at AAUW’s annual state convention in Los Alamos to Dr.

Summer Physics Camp For Young Women June 5-16

on May 1, 2017 - 6:21pm
LANL News:
 
Los Alamos National Laboratory, Pojoaque Valley High School and the American Physical Society would like to invite young women attending high school in Northern New Mexico to join them for a two-week "Summer Physics Camp for young women”.
 
  • When? 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, June 5-16.
  • Where? Pojoaque Valley High School
 
The camp will focus on boosting local young women's understanding of the physics of the Sun, Earth, and everything in between.
 
Daily activities will include demonstrations, hands-on laboratory experiments, and discussions with female

New Mexicans March For Climate, Jobs And Justice

on April 28, 2017 - 10:54am
SIERRA CLUB News:
 
New Mexicans are invited to take to the streets Saturday, April 29, to call for a strong government response to the global climate crisis.
 
People’s Climate Marches are planned in the state’s largest three cities: Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe. New Mexicans will join more than 100,000 people nationwide in more than 300 cities, representing a growing popular movement for climate justice.
 
From the disruption of ecosystems, a loss of biodiversity, an increase in extreme weather, rising seas, and the spread of new diseases, to resource scarcity that exacerbates

LAHS Grad Wins Prestigious National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship

on April 27, 2017 - 8:43am

Anna Scott, a senior majoring in chemistry at Montana State University, inspects a vial containing a protein for enzyme research on Monday, March 27, 2017, in Bozeman, Montana. Scott recently won a Graduate Research Fellowship from the National Science Foundation. MSU photo by Adrian Sanchez-Gonzalez
By ANNE CANTRELL
MSU News Service

BOZEMAN — A Montana State University student who would like to contribute to renewable energy efforts throughout her career in research has received a prestigious Graduate Research Fellowship from the National Science Foundation.

Anna Scott, a senior and 2013

LANL: Jaqueline L. Kiplinger To Receive Award For Pioneering Contributions To Chemistry

on April 26, 2017 - 7:49am

Jaqueline Kiplinger is the recipient of the 2017 Violet Diller Professional Excellence Award. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Iota Sigma Pi society to recognize advances in uranium and thorium chemistry  

Jaqueline Kiplinger, Los Alamos National Laboratory Fellow within the Inorganic, Isotope and Actinide Chemistry Group, is the recipient of the 2017 Violet Diller Professional Excellence Award given triennially by Iota Sigma Pi (the National Honor Society of Women in Chemistry). The award recognizes contributions to chemistry that have had widespread significance to the scientific community or

LANL: Managing Disease Spread Through Accessible Modeling

on April 26, 2017 - 7:23am

The research draws on Los Alamos’ expertise in computational modeling and health sciences and contributes to the Laboratory’s national security mission by protecting against biological threats. Infectious diseases are a leading cause of death globally. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Lower computing requirements and streamlined data analysis support public-health decision making

A new computer modeling study from Los Alamos National Laboratory is aimed at making epidemiological models more accessible and useful for public-health collaborators and improving disease-related decision making.

“In a

Taos Students Visit Museum Thanks To BSMA

on April 24, 2017 - 7:46am

BSM Educator Liz Martineau shows students the flash light they will use to make shadows during an activity. Photo by KayLinda Crawford/BSMA

BSM Educator Gordon McDonough explains the Human Battery exhibit to Taos second graders during their recent field trip. Photo by KayLinda Crawford/BSMA

Taos second graders use a tool to create short and long shadows. Photo by KayLinda Crawford/BSMA

​BSMA News:

Approximately 50 Taos second-graders were able to visit the Bradbury Science Museum Thursday in downtown Los Alamos, thanks to the Bradbury Science Museum Association (BSMA).

“Thank you!

Scenes From March For Science - Santa Fe Today

on April 22, 2017 - 3:26pm

U.S. Rep. Ben Ray Lujan with PEC Board Member Karyl Ann Armbuster at today's March For Science in downtown Santa Fe. U.S. Sen. Tom Udall ad Santa Fe Mayor Javier Gonzales also spoke at today's event and a letter sent by U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich was read to the crowd. Courtesy photo

Thousands of people participate in today's March for Science in Santa Fe. There are many booths on science with topics such as Chaco Canyon with the danger of fracking and science in the schools, experiments, solar and some hands on science for kids and adults set up all around the Roundhouse. Courtesy photo

Ahead Of March For Science, Udall Urges President To Fill Key Science Posts Throughout Administration

on April 21, 2017 - 5:47pm

U.S. SENATE News:

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, in advance of the March for Science, U.S. Sen. Tom Udall, a member of the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, joined a group of senators in urging President Trump to appoint well-qualified experts for critical science posts at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and throughout the federal government.

Nearly 100 days into his presidency, President Trump still has not appointed a science advisor, director for the White House OSTP, or a chief technology officer.

Letter To The Editor: No Science Rally In Los Alamos

on April 21, 2017 - 9:13am
By CATHERINE HENSLEY
Los Alamos

I have to respond to a letter in the Los Alamos Daily Post (link) suggesting that we are sleeping through the current challenges to science in our country. I think rather that it is a matter of preaching to the choir.  

In a town that exists for the pursuit of science, it seems silly to shout that we believe it. Therefore, three generations of my family will be going to Santa Fe Saturday to remind our state government that we believe in science, and that they should, too. My friends and neighbors already know that.

Study Examines Mortality Burden Of Modifiable Behavioral Risk Factors

on April 21, 2017 - 6:29am
SGIM News:
 
A team of researchers from Cleveland Clinic and New York University School of Medicine have found that based on 2014 data, obesity resulted in as much as 47 percent more life-years lost than tobacco, and tobacco caused similar life-years lost as high blood pressure.
 
Preliminary work presented by Cleveland Clinic today at the 2017 Society of General Internal Medicine Annual Meeting analyzed the contribution of modifiable behavioral risk factors to causes-of-death in the US population.
 
Based on this preliminary work, the team found the greatest number of preventable

Why Can We See And Hear Meteors At The Same Time?

on April 21, 2017 - 5:28am
A new study explains why we can hear meteors at the same time as we see them. Courtesy photo
 
By LAUREN LIPUMA
AGU Blogosphere
 
Light travels nearly a million times faster than sound. But for thousands of years, humans have reported hearing some meteors as they pass overhead, puzzling scientists for decades.
 
Now, a new study puts forth a simple explanation for the phenomenon: the sound waves aren’t coming from the meteor itself. Instead, radio waves created by the meteor convert to sound waves when they strike metal structures on Earth.
 
Edmund Halley – namesake of the famous

World Futures: INFORMATION - What And How Do We Teach People?

on April 21, 2017 - 5:15am

World Futures: What Do We Need?

By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute

It was not that long ago that we went to school to learn the three R’s – Reading, Writing, and Arithmetic. These skills served the student well as the foundation for learning other skills, communicating, and doing basic mathematical calculations of everyday life.  Today reading is often supplanted by video, writing has given way to keyboarding, and mathematics has become a smart phone application.

Video increases the speed of information transmission, keyboarding increases speed of composition, and the smart

LANL: Students Showcase Projects At 27th Annual Supercomputing Challenge

on April 20, 2017 - 10:48am

Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Supercomputing Challenge is project-based learning geared to teaching a wide range of skills: research, writing, teamwork, time management, oral presentations and computer programming. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Team-based research highlights a wide range of skills

More than 200 New Mexico students and teachers from 55 different teams will come together April 24-25 at the  Jewish Community Center in Albuquerque to showcase their computing research projects at the 27th annual New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge expo and awards ceremony.

“It is encouraging

Letter To The Editor: Science, Policy And Earth Day

on April 20, 2017 - 10:27am
By KHALIL SPENCER
Los Alamos

In Honor of Upcoming Earth Day: Are Science and Politics Immiscible Quantities?

“Americans have reached a point where ignorance, especially of anything related to public policy, is an actual virtue,” the scholar Tom Nichols writes in his timely new book, “The Death of Expertise.” “To reject the advice of experts is to assert autonomy, a way for Americans to insulate their increasingly fragile egos from ever being told they’re wrong about anything.

Rally For Science In Santa Fe ... But Not Los Alamos

on April 19, 2017 - 9:30pm
By JODY BENSON
Los Alamos

Los Alamos isn’t hosting a Rally or a March for Science. Santa Fe is, though. It will begin at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Earth Day, at the Roundhouse. Get out there with your dedication and brilliance. Remember, there is no planet B, and scientists can prove it. 

The organizers of the March state: “The mischaracterization of science as a partisan issue, which has given policymakers permission to reject overwhelming evidence, is a critical and urgent matter.

Science On Tap: Seeing Inside Fukushima April 20

on April 18, 2017 - 10:12pm

LA CREATIVE DISTRICT News:

In March 2011, a tsunami slammed into the coast of Japan and initiated the meltdown of three reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Radiation levels inside the buildings there are still lethal, but the cleanup needs to proceed.

Come and listen to Chris Morris, of the Lab’s Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, talk about how our scientists are using people-friendly particles called muons to help assess the status of the nuclear fuel inside the damaged reactors.

Periodic Model Predicts Spread Of Lyme Disease

on April 18, 2017 - 5:34pm
SIAM News:
 
PHILADELPHIA, PA — Lyme disease is among the most common vector-borne illnesses in North America, Europe, and some parts of Asia. A spirochete bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi causes the disease, and blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) are responsible for the majority of North American transmissions.
 
Commonly known as deer ticks, blacklegged ticks exhibit two-year life cycles with the following four stages: eggs, larvae, nymphs, and adults. Larvae primarily attack white-footed mice, then become nymphs upon obtaining a blood meal.

Letter To The Editor: Let’s Stand Strong Against Anti-Science Forces

on April 18, 2017 - 7:07am
By STEPHANIE NAKHLEH
Los Alamos

This Saturday, April 22, people from all over northern New Mexico will gather in Santa Fe in support of science. As the event organizers put it, “The March for Science champions science as a pillar for the advancement of human knowledge, progress and prosperity. We unite on April 22, Earth Day, as a diverse, nonpartisan group to call for the freedom of science in the interest of the common good, and for political leaders and policymakers to enact evidence-based policies in the public interest.”

In Los Alamos, we benefit especially from federally-funded science,

March For Science - Santa Fe April 22

on April 18, 2017 - 6:53am
 
SCIENCE News:
 
SANTA FE  In the wake of the Women’s March on Washington comes the March for Science, this Saturday, April 22.
 
People across the world have been posting photos of their poster board signs proclaiming #WhyIMarch (for science): I march for the planet. I march for truth. I march for clean water for BEER. Other signs elaborate: Climate change is not a Chinese hoax. Science is real. Science is not a liberal agenda. Earth needs thinkers not deniers. And so many more!
 
Scientists and non-scientists from across New Mexico are marching together April 22 to support

Fifty Taos 2nd Graders Tour Bradbury Science Museum

on April 17, 2017 - 5:20pm

Fifty Ranchos Elementary School 2nd graders on a field trip Thursday to the Bradbury Science Museum, made possible by the generous sponsorship of Los Alamos National Bank. Photo by KayLinda Crawford

Staff Report

Fifty 2nd graders from Ranchos Elementary in Taos took a field trip to the Bradbury Science Museum Thursday, April 13 thanks to the generous sponsorship of bus transportation provided by Los Alamos National Bank.

The Bradbury Science Museum Association, the museum's non-profit education outreach partner, in collaboration with Los Alamos National Bank, is providing the much needed

NASA's MAVEN Mission Reveals Mars Has Metal In Its Atmosphere

on April 12, 2017 - 6:13pm
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Mars has electrically charged metal atoms (ions) high in its atmosphere, according to new results from NASA's MAVEN spacecraft. 
 
The metal ions can reveal previously invisible activity in the mysterious electrically charged upper atmosphere (ionosphere) of Mars.
 
"MAVEN has made the first direct detection of the permanent presence of metal ions in the ionosphere of a planet other than Earth," said Joseph Grebowsky of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland and lead author of a new study detailing MAVEN’s results.
 
"Because metallic

LANL: On-The-Range Detection Technology Could Corral Bovine TB

on April 12, 2017 - 12:13pm

In cattle, Mycobacterium bovis causes the disease, which easily spreads among large herds, periodically resulting in the quarantine and destruction of thousands of cattle in the United States, Canada and abroad and restricting international shipments. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Biomarker-based assay offers ranchers immediate, on-site test results

A research breakthrough allowing the first direct, empirical, blood-based, cow-side test for diagnosing bovine tuberculosis (TB) could spare ranchers and the agriculture industry from costly quarantines and the mass slaughter of animals infected

AGU: ‘Cold’ Great Spot Discovered On Jupiter

on April 12, 2017 - 8:57am
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — A second Great Spot has been discovered on Jupiter by astronomers, rivaling the scale of the planet’s famous Great Red Spot and created by the powerful energies exerted by the great planet’s polar aurorae.
 
Dubbed the ‘Great Cold Spot’, it has been observed as a localized dark spot, up to 24,000 kilometers in longitude and 12,000 kilometers in latitude, in the gas giant’s thin high-altitude thermosphere, that is around 200 degrees Kelvin cooler than the surrounding atmosphere, which can range in temperature between 700 degrees Kelvin (426 degrees Celsius)
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UbiQD Announces Record Efficiency From Its Cadmium-Free Quantum Dots

on April 10, 2017 - 8:08am

Prototype electricity-producing quantum dot window developed by UbiQD, one square foot in size, sits on a rock outcropping near the company's headquarters in Los Alamos. Courtesy photo

BUSINESS News:

  • Large-area solar harvesting window prototype development accelerating

UbiQD, LLC, a New Mexico-based quantum dot manufacturer, announced today that it has achieved greater than 80 percent quantum yield, or optical efficiency, for its quantum dots over a broad spectrum from the visible to the near infra-red (550 nm to 1000 nm peak emission). For some colors between orange (600 nm) and deep red

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