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Letter To The Editor: Let’s Stand Strong Against Anti-Science Forces

on April 18, 2017 - 7:07am
By STEPHANIE NAKHLEH
Los Alamos

This Saturday, April 22, people from all over northern New Mexico will gather in Santa Fe in support of science. As the event organizers put it, “The March for Science champions science as a pillar for the advancement of human knowledge, progress and prosperity. We unite on April 22, Earth Day, as a diverse, nonpartisan group to call for the freedom of science in the interest of the common good, and for political leaders and policymakers to enact evidence-based policies in the public interest.”

In Los Alamos, we benefit especially from federally-funded science,

March For Science - Santa Fe April 22

on April 18, 2017 - 6:53am
 
SCIENCE News:
 
SANTA FE  In the wake of the Women’s March on Washington comes the March for Science, this Saturday, April 22.
 
People across the world have been posting photos of their poster board signs proclaiming #WhyIMarch (for science): I march for the planet. I march for truth. I march for clean water for BEER. Other signs elaborate: Climate change is not a Chinese hoax. Science is real. Science is not a liberal agenda. Earth needs thinkers not deniers. And so many more!
 
Scientists and non-scientists from across New Mexico are marching together April 22 to support

Fifty Taos 2nd Graders Tour Bradbury Science Museum

on April 17, 2017 - 5:20pm

Fifty Ranchos Elementary School 2nd graders on a field trip Thursday to the Bradbury Science Museum, made possible by the generous sponsorship of Los Alamos National Bank. Photo by KayLinda Crawford

Staff Report

Fifty 2nd graders from Ranchos Elementary in Taos took a field trip to the Bradbury Science Museum Thursday, April 13 thanks to the generous sponsorship of bus transportation provided by Los Alamos National Bank.

The Bradbury Science Museum Association, the museum's non-profit education outreach partner, in collaboration with Los Alamos National Bank, is providing the much needed

NASA's MAVEN Mission Reveals Mars Has Metal In Its Atmosphere

on April 12, 2017 - 6:13pm
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Mars has electrically charged metal atoms (ions) high in its atmosphere, according to new results from NASA's MAVEN spacecraft. 
 
The metal ions can reveal previously invisible activity in the mysterious electrically charged upper atmosphere (ionosphere) of Mars.
 
"MAVEN has made the first direct detection of the permanent presence of metal ions in the ionosphere of a planet other than Earth," said Joseph Grebowsky of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland and lead author of a new study detailing MAVEN’s results.
 
"Because metallic

LANL: On-The-Range Detection Technology Could Corral Bovine TB

on April 12, 2017 - 12:13pm

In cattle, Mycobacterium bovis causes the disease, which easily spreads among large herds, periodically resulting in the quarantine and destruction of thousands of cattle in the United States, Canada and abroad and restricting international shipments. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Biomarker-based assay offers ranchers immediate, on-site test results

A research breakthrough allowing the first direct, empirical, blood-based, cow-side test for diagnosing bovine tuberculosis (TB) could spare ranchers and the agriculture industry from costly quarantines and the mass slaughter of animals infected

AGU: ‘Cold’ Great Spot Discovered On Jupiter

on April 12, 2017 - 8:57am
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — A second Great Spot has been discovered on Jupiter by astronomers, rivaling the scale of the planet’s famous Great Red Spot and created by the powerful energies exerted by the great planet’s polar aurorae.
 
Dubbed the ‘Great Cold Spot’, it has been observed as a localized dark spot, up to 24,000 kilometers in longitude and 12,000 kilometers in latitude, in the gas giant’s thin high-altitude thermosphere, that is around 200 degrees Kelvin cooler than the surrounding atmosphere, which can range in temperature between 700 degrees Kelvin (426 degrees Celsius)
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UbiQD Announces Record Efficiency From Its Cadmium-Free Quantum Dots

on April 10, 2017 - 8:08am

Prototype electricity-producing quantum dot window developed by UbiQD, one square foot in size, sits on a rock outcropping near the company's headquarters in Los Alamos. Courtesy photo

BUSINESS News:

  • Large-area solar harvesting window prototype development accelerating

UbiQD, LLC, a New Mexico-based quantum dot manufacturer, announced today that it has achieved greater than 80 percent quantum yield, or optical efficiency, for its quantum dots over a broad spectrum from the visible to the near infra-red (550 nm to 1000 nm peak emission). For some colors between orange (600 nm) and deep red

Bandelier Superintendent Jason Lott And Dr. Olivia Carril Share Science Project Data

on April 9, 2017 - 7:09am

Bandelier Superintendent Jason Lott. Photo by Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com

BANDELIER News:

Find out what scientists are learning about the ecosystems in Bandelier.

At 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 18 Bandelier Superintendent Jason Lott and Dr. Olivia Carril will discuss findings in recent science projects conducted in our local national monument including the first-ever survey of native bees in Bandelier, and likely the first systematic survey ever conducted on the Pajarito Plateau.

Dr. Olivia Carril. Courtesy photo

It is estimated that there are between 1,000 and 1,400 bee species in New

Udall, Heinrich, Lujan Grisham Announce $1.6 Million To UNM To Train STEM Students And Workers For Labs Jobs In Microsystems Technology

on April 6, 2017 - 8:54am
U.S. SENATE News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. U.S. Senators Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich and U.S. Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham have announced a funding award of $1.6 million to the University of New Mexico to train STEM workers for jobs specializing in the development of microsystems.
 
The money will go to UNM's Southwest Center for Microsystems Education (SCME) program, which provides materials, models, and professional development activities for microsystem technicians to develop a workforce that is prepared for research and development and industry manufacturing positions in this growing

Four LAHS Students Win Coveted Spots At ISEF

on April 4, 2017 - 11:22am

LAHS students heading to the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair May 14-19  in Los Angeles, from left, Alex Ionkov, Priyanka Velappan, Lillian Peterson and Sophia Li. Courtesy photo

EDUCATION News:

Four Los Alamos High School students recently won coveted spots to compete at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) May 14-19, 2017, in Los Angeles, Calif. Winners of all expense paid trips to the Intel Fair are Sophia Li (11th grade), Lillian Peterson (9th grade) and team project of Priyanka Velappan and Alex Inokov (11th grade).

This is the 13th straight year

March For Science Santa Fe April 22

on April 4, 2017 - 8:17am
 
MSSF News:
 
SANTA FE ― Join the March for Science - Santa Fe April 22 at the State Capitol in Santa Fe.
 
The March for Science champions science as a pillar for the advancement of human knowledge, progress, and prosperity. Folks will unite April 22, Earth Day, as a diverse, nonpartisan group to call for the freedom of science in the interest of the common good, and for political leaders and policymakers to enact evidence-based policies in the public interest.
 
“The March for Science is a celebration of science, and of public engagement with science, but it’s not only about

NASA: Star Discovered In Closest Known Orbit Around Likely Black Hole

on April 3, 2017 - 4:59pm
Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/University of Alberta/A.Bahramian et al.; Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss 
 
NASA News:
 
Astronomers have found evidence for a star that whips around a black hole about twice an hour. This may be the tightest orbital dance ever witnessed for a likely black hole and a companion star.
 
This discovery was made using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory as well as NASA's NuSTAR and CSIRO's Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA).
 
The close-in stellar couple — known as a binary — is located in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae, a dense cluster of stars in our galaxy

Could Fast Radio Bursts Be Powering Alien Probes?

on April 3, 2017 - 4:39pm
 
CFA News:
 
CAMBRIDGE, MA ― The search for extraterrestrial intelligence has looked for many different signs of alien life, from radio broadcasts to laser flashes, without success.
 
However, newly published research suggests that mysterious phenomena called fast radio bursts could be evidence of advanced alien technology. Specifically, these bursts might be leakage from planet-sized transmitters powering interstellar probes in distant galaxies.
 
"Fast radio bursts are exceedingly bright given their short duration and origin at great distances, and we

AGU: Last Remnant Of North American Ice Sheet Likely To Disappear In 300 Years

on April 3, 2017 - 10:33am
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — The last remaining piece of the vast ice sheet that once covered North America is doomed to vanish in the next few centuries, a new study finds.
 
Rising temperatures in the Arctic have caused the Barnes Ice Cap to melt at an extraordinary pace, and nothing short of removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere can prevent it from completely disappearing, according to a new study modeling the ice cap’s behavior.
 
Under a business-as-usual greenhouse gas emissions scenario, the study’s authors project the ice cap will disappear within the next 300 years.

State Science & Engineering Fair Underway Today

on April 1, 2017 - 12:36pm
Today 21 Los Alamos Public School students are competing at the New Mexico State Science and Engineering Fair. The local students qualified for the state fair by earning top spots atMarch 4 Northeastern New Mexico Science and Engineering Fair. Judging concludes this afternoon with an awards ceremonies beginning at 6 this evening. Courtesy photo

Can The Southwest Endure A Change In Climate?

on March 31, 2017 - 10:03am
From left, retired National Weather Service Meteorologist Deirdre Kann; in-depth environmental journalist  Laura Paskas; and David Stuart, an archeologist with lessons learned from the ancient Chaco Canyon culture in New Mexico, gave climate-related presentations Tuesday at the Society for Applied Anthropology conference in Santa Fe. Photo by Roger Snodgrass/ladailypost.com
 
According to Bill deBuys, author and full-time humanist, climate change leads to an enervating depression trap. Photo by Roger Snodgrass/ladailypost.com

By ROGER SNODGRASS
Los Alamos Daily Post

In case there were any

Tales Of Our Times: When Poisons Move, Risks Evolve

on March 31, 2017 - 6:53am
Tales of Our Times
By JOHN BARTLIT
New Mexico Citizens
for Clean Air & Water

When Poisons Move, Risks Evolve

 
Toxic materials in nature are like a stack of ball bearings on a subway platform. They pose little risk until they start to move.

Follow the trail of the Earth’s store of hazardous materials and the shuffling that moves them through the air and water. The forces are geologic history, weather, time, and inexorably man. Without man’s doings, toxic substances are widely found in nature, in some places more than others.

100+ Women Who Care Donate First Quarter Meeting Funds To Bradbury Science Museum Association

on March 25, 2017 - 10:29am

On behalf of 100+ Women Who Care, UWNNM Executive Director Kristy Ortega, right, presents a donation check to BSMA Vice President Ryn Herrmann, left, and BSMA Secretary KayLinda Crawford Friday at the Bradbury Science Museum. Courtesy photo 

COMMUNITY News:

100+ Women Who Care, the Los Alamos group of women who strive to have a positive impact in the community without the time-consuming effort  associated with fundraising, gathered recently for their first quarterly meeting of 2017 at project Y in Central Park Square.

The group chose to award its first quarter funds to the Bradbury

EM, UKAEA Expand Collaboration On Robotics

on March 25, 2017 - 6:45am

Acting EM Assistant Secretary Sue Cange and Rob Buckingham, director of the Center for Remote Applications in Challenging Environments, shake hands after signing the Statement of Intent. Courtesy/DOE-EM

DOE News:

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The Department of Energy Office of Evironmental Management (EM) and the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Agency (UKAEA) have agreed to further collaborate to develop and apply robotics to nuclear decommissioning tasks.

Representatives from EM and the UKAEA earlier this month signed a new Statement of Intent (SOI), providing the framework for exchange of information

Graduating Seniors Invited To Apply For J. Robert Oppenheimer Memorial Scholarship

on March 24, 2017 - 10:29am

J. Robert Oppenheimer. Courtesy photo

EDUCATION News:

The J. Robert Oppenheimer Memorial Committee is dedicated to furthering the memory and spirit of J. Robert Oppenheimer through scholarships to graduating seniors attending Los Alamos, Pojoaque, Capitol, and Santa Fe public high schools.

The committee awarded the first scholarship in 1984 and the number of scholarships awarded has grown over the years due to the generous contributions of many people. Twelve scholarships were awarded in 2016.

The Committee would like to remind graduating seniors that the deadline for applications for Los

LANL: Ultrafast Measurements Explain Quantum Dot Voltage Drop

on March 22, 2017 - 9:50am

A femtosecond laser pulse launches a photocurrent transient in a quantum dot solid, which is time-resolved using ultrafast sampling electronics. This technique provides unprecedented insights into early time photoconductance in quantum dot assemblies for solar cells and photodetectors. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Insights pave way for solar cells and photodetectors based on tunable nanoparticles

Solar cells and photodetectors could soon be made from new types of materials based on semiconductor quantum dots, thanks to new insights based on ultrafast measurements capturing real-time

Breaking The Supermassive Black Hole Speed Limit

on March 21, 2017 - 11:08am

Quasar growing under intense accretion streams. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

A new computer simulation helps explain the existence of puzzling supermassive black holes observed in the early universe. The simulation is based on a computer code used to understand the coupling of radiation and certain materials.

“Supermassive black holes have a speed limit that governs how fast and how large they can grow,” said Joseph Smidt of the Theoretical Design Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory, “The relatively recent discovery of supermassive black holes in the early development of the universe

LANL: Less Radiation In Inner Van Allen Belt Than Previously Believed

on March 21, 2017 - 7:55am

This artist’s rendering of the Van Allen Probes mission shows the path of its two spacecraft through the radiation belts that surround Earth, which are made visible in false color. Courtesy/NASA  

LANL News:

  • New study shows scientists the ‘snowflake in a rainstorm’

The inner Van Allen belt has less radiation than previously believed, according to a recent study in the Journal of Geophysical Research. Observations from NASA’s Van Allen probes show the fastest, most energetic electrons in the inner radiation belt are actually much rarer and harder to find than scientists expected.

Museum Of Natural History & Science Opens Registration For Summer Science Camps 2017

on March 20, 2017 - 6:39am
Courtesy photo
 
NMMNHS News:
 
ALBUQUERQUE — Enrich your child’s summer this year with mind-expanding fun at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science’s (NMMNHS) popular Young Explorers Summer Camp program.
 
Registration is now open for children from kindergarten through the eighth grade. Each Summer Camp session is one week long, with activities 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. every weekday. Each week is theme-based, with the first session beginning the week of June 12 and the last beginning the week of July 30.
 
NMMNHS has been offering science-based summer camps to elementary

Study Suggests Brain Injury Effects Last Seven Years

on March 18, 2017 - 8:43am
HEALTH News:
 
A new study that was presented Feb. 10 to the annual meeting of the Association of Academic Physiatrists, suggests brain injury long-term effects in children may still be present as long as seven years after the injury is sustained.
 
Furthermore, researchers found that children who sustain brain injuries are at increased risk to develop other functioning issues. The research highlights the importance of protecting children from brain injuries, especially children involved in high-risk sports or activities linked to traumatic brain injury.
 
“More than 630,000 children

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