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LAHS Sophomore Lillian Petersen Wins First Place In Category At 2018 International Science Fair

on May 18, 2018 - 4:57pm

Scene from the International Science and Engineering Fair at which LAHS sophomore Lillian Petersen takes top award in her category. Courtesy photo

LAHS sophomore Lillian Petersen takes top award in her category at the International Science and Engineering Fair. Courtesy/Mark Petersen

LAPS News:

Los Alamos High School sophomore Lillian Petersen took the top award in her category Friday, May 18 at the International Science and Engineering Fair in Pittsburgh, PA.

Petersen’s project, “Predicting Food Shortages in Africa from Satellite Imagery,” won her the top placement in the Earth and

State Economic Development Department: $250,000 To Assist Small Science & Technology Companies

on May 18, 2018 - 9:57am
EDD Secretary Matt Geisel
 
EDD News:
 
SANTA FE Economic Development Secretary Matt Geisel announced Thursday that three New Mexico companies will receive New Mexico Small Business Innovation Research (NMSBIR) Matching Grants to help their businesses grow.
 
The NMSBIR program is designed to support science and technology companies by assisting them in business development, technology commercialization and entry to market.  
 
"Since 2011, we've cut taxes and created a business-friendly environment in New Mexico to help our homegrown companies thrive," Secretary Geisel said.

Science On Tap: Building Tiny Structures – Two Photons At A Time

on May 17, 2018 - 3:33pm

Los Alamos Creative District News:

The next Science On Tap meets 5:30-7 p.m. May 21 at UnQuarked -The Wine room, 145 Central Park Square in Los Alamos.

Matthew Herman, of the Lab’s Engineered Materials group, will talk about “two-photon polymerization,” a form of 3-D printing, where an object is built within a chemically photo-reactive material using ultrashort laser pulses. Building an object, only a couple of photons at a time, means items can be constructed with fine detail.

Items manufactured this way could benefit everything from high-energy physics to the production of tiny

AGU: Triennial Earth-Sun Summit – Onsite Information; Potentially Newsworthy Presentations

on May 17, 2018 - 3:20pm
A solar prominence captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) in August 2012. Courtesy NASA/SDO/AIA/Goddard Space Flight Center
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — The American Geophysical Union’s Space Physics and Aeronomy Section (AGU/SPA) and the American Astronomical Society’s Solar Physics Division (AAS/SPD) will meet next week for the second Triennial Earth-Sun Summit (TESS), which runs 20-24 May 2018 at the Lansdowne Resort and Spain Leesburg, Virginia.
 
Included in this advisory:
  1. About the meeting and scientific program
  2. Press registration
  3. Press room and hotel information
  4. Potentially

AGU: Sounds Of Melting Glaciers Could Reveal Shrinkage Speed

on May 16, 2018 - 4:12pm
This recording captures 30 seconds of underwater sound produced by the melting of Hans Glacier in Hornsund fjord, pictured here. Recordings can be heard here. Courtesy/Oskar Glowacki
 
This recording captures thirty seconds of underwater sound produced by an iceberg in close proximity to the underwater microphone. Recordings can be heard here. Courtesy/Oskar Glowacki
 
AGU News:
 
Scientists could potentially use the racket made by melting glaciers to estimate how fast they are disappearing, according to a new study of audio recordings captured in the waters of an Arctic fjord.
 
As

LANL: Mapping Body’s Battle With Ebola And Zika

on May 14, 2018 - 11:27am

Computer models are providing valuable insight to the structure and function of both Ebola and Zika viruses as they invade the host’s cells. Side view, left, and top view of the Ebola Virus fusion end-state in a molecular dynamics computer model. Courtesy/LANL

 

LANL News:

 

The viruses that cause Ebola and Zika, daunting diseases that inspire concern at every outbreak, share a strong similarity in how they first infiltrate a host’s cells.

Los Alamos Faith And Science Forum: 2018 Summer Series Begins Wednesday June 6

on May 12, 2018 - 10:23am

The Los Alamos Faith and Science Forum summer series begins June 6 with the topic, ‘Why discuss Evolution?’ Courtesy/LAF&SF

LAF&SF News:

Purposeful Evolution?

One of the main stumbling blocks about evolution, for people of faith, is that it is portrayed as totally random and without direction. They ask—where in this is the Creator’s purpose?

Actually, however, recent research in evolutionary biology increasingly allows for the possibility that evolution is not always so random.

Wallace: Plutonium Decision Big Vote Of Confidence For Los Alamos National Laboratory

on May 11, 2018 - 1:52pm
LANL Director Dr. Terry Wallace
 
By MAIRE O’NEILL
Los Alamos Daily Post

Los Alamos National Laboratory Director Dr. Terry Wallace told Lab staff today in an internal memo obtained by the Los Alamos Daily Post that the National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA) has given the Lab “a big vote of confidence”.

“They are investing an additional $3 billion in new mission space, which includes people, infrastructure and equipment.

LANL: Levitation Yields Better Neutron-lifetime Measurement ... At Last, Potential Corrections Are Not Larger Than Uncertainties

on May 10, 2018 - 3:45pm

Trapping ultracold neutrons and measuring their lifespans has been a successful project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory accelerator center, LANSCE. Here, part of the magnet array is shown, with the vacuum vessel end cap removed for magnetic field mapping, performed by Tennessee Technological University physics student Keegan Hoffman. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

Being repulsive can have its advantages.

LANL, University Of Nebraska Partner For Biodefense

on May 8, 2018 - 5:11pm

From left, Ken Bayles, Ph.D., of UNMC; Mark Riley, Ph.D., of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln; and Harshini Mukundan, Ph.D., of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

A partnership involving the University of Nebraska and Los Alamos National Laboratory will boost educational opportunities for students seeking careers in the biodefense field.

“You can develop solutions through partnerships. You can accomplish much more as a whole than by working alone,” said Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist and partnership coordinator Harshini Mukundan, Ph.D.

The partnership

Alzheimer’s Researchers To Convene In Albuquerque

on May 8, 2018 - 8:54am

Brain inflammation from Alzheimer’s Disease. Courtesy/NIH, National Institute on Aging

New Mexico Consortium News:

More than 50 New Mexico researchers specializing in Alzheimer’s Disease and related dementias will meet Wednesday in Albuquerque to discuss current research efforts and progress, as well as funding opportunities for continued research.

In order to promote collaborative research across the state, this workshop will bring together stakeholders from government, academia, industry, non-profit organizations, patient organizations and regulatory agencies to address challenges

AGU: Fresh Results From NASA’s Galileo Spacecraft 20 Years On

on May 3, 2018 - 7:16am
This image of Ganymede, one of Jupiter’s moons and the largest moon in our solar system, was taken by NASA’s Galileo spacecraft. Courtesy/NASA
 
AGU News:
 
Far across the solar system, from where Earth appears merely as a pale blue dot, NASA’s Galileo spacecraft spent eight years orbiting Jupiter.
 
During that time, the hearty spacecraft — slightly larger than a full-grown giraffe — sent back spates of discoveries on the gas giant’s moons, including the observation of a magnetic environment around Ganymede that was distinct from Jupiter’s own magnetic field.

Regional Coalition Of LANL Communities Board Hears Public Comment On Joint Services Agreement

on May 2, 2018 - 11:56am
Regional Coalition of LANL Communities Board members hear public comments during their April 27 meeting in Espanola. Photo by Maire O'Neill/ladailypost.com
 
By MAIRE O’NEILL
Los Alamos Daily Post

Regional Coalition of LANL Communities board members meeting in Espanola Friday agreed on a new Joint Powers Agreement (JPA) to be distributed to Coalition communities for their review including a last minute change proposed by Los Alamos County Council Vice Chair Christine Chandler.

The change related to the Coalition’s advocacy of “long-term, stable funding for LANL

Phi Beta Kappa Honors 42 Los Alamos High School Students At Banquet May 20

on May 1, 2018 - 8:51am

Dr. Jennifer Hollingsworth. Courtesy photo
 
By JOYCE A. GUZIK
Phi Beta Kappa

 On Sunday evening, May 20, the Los Alamos Phi Beta Kappa Association will hold its 62nd annual banquet to honor the top graduates of Los Alamos High School.

Phi Beta Kappa is the oldest undergraduate honor society in the United States and has about 250 members in Los Alamos County (2% of the county’s adult population).

The banquet for the honor graduates, Phi Beta Kappa Members and their guests starts at 5:30 p.m. at Fuller Lodge in Los Alamos and is catered by Secret City Kitchen.

The Class of 2018

Celebrate ‘May The Fourth’ At PEEC With Special Sci-Fi Planetarium Show

on April 30, 2018 - 2:59pm

Join Rick Wallace to explore how alien life could look on other planets and how likely it is to discover creatures of Star Wars and other popular science-fiction films. The show is 7 p.m. Friday, May 4 in the Los Alamos Nature Center Planetarium. May the Fourth be with you! Courtesy/PEEC

PEEC News:

Celebrate May the Fourth in the Los Alamos Nature Center Planetarium. At this special show, Rick Wallace will explore what scientists predict alien life could look like on other planets and, if life exists beyond earth, how likely it is to see the creatures of Star Wars and other popular science

LANL: 28th Annual New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge Winners

on April 28, 2018 - 1:53pm
LANL News:
 
Jen Marie Phifer and Forest Good of Los Lunas High School won top honors Tuesday at the 28th Annual New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge held at Los Alamos National Laboratory.
 
Their project, “What’s Missing?” looks at a way to create a systematized method for finding missing pieces of data. The project has implications for the fields of accounting, logistics, and cybersecurity.
 
Second place went to Lillian Petersen of Los Alamos High School for her project, “Predicting Food Shortages in Africa from Satellite Imagery.” She created a tool to predict crop yields so that

Bandelier Announces Bird Of The Month For May

on April 28, 2018 - 1:52pm

The bird of the month for May is the Yellow-rumped warbler. Photo by Ranger Sally King/NPS

BANDELIER News:

The bird of the month for May is the Yellow-rumped warbler. These small birds are known for their yellow rump that can be seen as they fly away. There are two subspecies included in this designation, one is the Myrtle with a white throat and typically seen in the east. The other is the Audubon’s, which has a yellow throat and is typically seen in the west. Keep an eye on the Bandelier Facebook page for pictures and more information about this bird.

Bandelier is celebrating the Year of

Los Lunas High School Students Take Top Award In 28th Annual Supercomputing Challenge

on April 28, 2018 - 5:24am
Jen Marie Phifer and Forest Good win top honors.  Teams from Los Alamos High School take second and third place awards. Courtesy photo
 
LANL News:
 
Jen Marie Phifer and Forest Good of Los Lunas High School won top honors Tuesday at the 28th Annual New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge held at Los Alamos National Laboratory.  
 
Their project, “What’s Missing?” looks at a way to create a systematized method for finding missing pieces of data. The project has implications for the fields of accounting, logistics, and cybersecurity.
 
Second place went to Lillian Petersen of Los Alamos

Story Of The Stars: Native American Science Night

on April 28, 2018 - 3:57am

Los Alamos High School Student Lillian Petersen To Present Research In Washington, D.C. May 2

on April 27, 2018 - 8:21am
LAHS sophomore Lillian Petersen is invited to present her research May 2 in Washington, D.C. Courtesy/New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge, LANL

EDUCATION News:

Los Alamos High School sophomore Lillian Petersen was invited to present her research at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in Washington, D.C.

Petersen will present an institution-wide seminar Wednesday, May 2, titled “Predicting Food Shortages in Africa from Satellite Imagery”. It will be viewable by live web broadcast at 10:30 a.m. MST Wednesday. 

Petersen developed software to predict crop production in Africa

Bradbury Science Museum Celebrates 25th Anniversary!

on April 26, 2018 - 3:16pm

The Bradbury Science Museum in downtown Los Alamos celebrated its 25th Anniversary Wednesday and BSM Director Linda Deck received a Letter of Recognition from Manhattan Project National Historical Park officials and Site Manager Ranger Charlie Strickfaden at the event. Photo by KayLinda Crawford

BSM Educator Mel Strong stands in front of a photo of Ian Aeby, inventor of modern day Pinocchio during the demonstration. Photo by KayLinda Crawford

BSM Director Linda Deck speaks to crowd during the 25th anniversary celebration at the museum. Photo by KayLinda Crawford

Staff Report

Community

NNSA Awards $7 Million Cooperative Agreement To University Of Texas At Austin

on April 26, 2018 - 2:40pm
NNSA News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C.  The Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) has designated a new Center of Excellence at the University of Texas at Austin as part of the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances (SSAA) Program. 
 
“These grants ensure a pipeline of world-class scientists trained in areas of relevance to our stockpile stewardship mission,” said Dr. Kathleen Alexander, Assistant Deputy Administrator for Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation in NNSA’s Office of Defense Programs. 
 
The University of Texas at Austin Center for

AGU: Winter Wave Heights, Extreme Storms On The Rise In Western Europe

on April 26, 2018 - 2:33pm
Waves crashing onto Chesil Beach in Dorset during the winter of 2013/14. Courtesy/Tim Poate, University of Plymouth
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Average winter wave heights along the Atlantic coast of Western Europe have been rising for almost seven decades, according to new research.
 
The coastlines of Scotland and Ireland have seen the largest increases, with the average height of winter waves more than 10 millimeters (more than 0.4 inches) per year higher than in 1948. That is more than more than 0.7 meters (2.3 feet) in total.
 
That has also led to increased wave heights

NIST Team Shows Tiny Frequency Combs Are Reliable Measurement Tools

on April 25, 2018 - 2:53pm

Composite photo of the test bed for NIST’s chip-based optical frequency synthesizer. A key component, NIST’s frequency comb on a chip, is mounted in the set-up on the lower left. A sample output of the programmable synthesizer, an optical frequency spectrum, is shown at middle-right. The synthesizer components provide for further integration into easily portable packages. Photo by Burrus/NIST

NIST News:

In an advance that could shrink many measurement technologies, scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and partners have demonstrated the first miniaturized

Scenes From 28th Annual New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge Awards Ceremony

on April 24, 2018 - 4:13pm

Scene from the 28th Annual New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge Awards Ceremony this morning at the Los Alamos Church of Christ at 2323 Diamond Dr. More than 30 awards and recognitions were presented to high school students at the event. Also, more than $18,000 in scholarships was awarded along with some $5,000 in cash given to participants during an action-packed computer random drawing. Photo by John McHale/ladailypost.com

Los Alamos High School student Lillian Petersen receives the Community Impact Award for her project, Predicting Food Shortages in Africa from Satellite Imagery from

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