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LANL: Innate Fingerprint Could Detect Tampered Steel

on November 28, 2018 - 11:34am

David Mascarenas, a research and development engineer at LANL, used Barkhausen noise to find unique-looking ‘fingerprints’ in steel that could help to verify weapons treaties and reduce the use of counterfeit bolts in the construction industry. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Treaty compliance aided by spotting illicit artillery exchange and duplication

Researchers using magnetic signals have found unique “fingerprints” on steel, which could help to verify weapons treaties and reduce the use of counterfeit bolts in the construction industry.

 

“Magnetic signals provide a wide range of possible

UbiQD Of Los Alamos Launches Quantum Dot Greenhouse Film Product

on November 27, 2018 - 4:05pm

UbiQD launched its retrofit greenhouse film product called UbiGro on Monday, Nov. 26, 2018. Courtesy/UbiQD, Inc.

Greenhouse Technology Engineer Damon Hebert checks on a tomato study grown under UbiGro films at the New Mexico Consortium (NMC) greenhouse in Los Alamos. Courtesy/UbiQD, Inc.

UbiQD News:

  • The company has garnered EPA approval to manufacture its first commercial product, a luminescent film called UbiGro that improves crop quality and yield

UbiQD, Inc., a Los Alamos-based nanotechnology development company, announced today that it has launched its first commercial quantum dot

AGU: Oil Extraction Likely Triggered Mid-Century Earthquakes In Los Angeles

on November 23, 2018 - 10:27am

Oil fueled the growth of Los Angeles from 50,000 people in 1890 to 1.5 million in 1940. By the 1940s, the Signal Hill field alone had a forest of 20,000 derricks among its residential homes. Los Angeles County still has 3,000 active wells. Signal Hill postcard c. 1926 Courtesy/Werner Von Boltenstern Postcard Collection, Loyola Marymount University library archive

AGU News:

  • New study revisits data, eyewitness accounts from the early instrumentation age

 
By LIZA LESTER
AGU

World War II-era oil pumping under Los Angeles likely triggered a rash of mid-sized earthquakes in the 1930s and

Learn About Asteroids And Watch ‘National Parks Adventure’ In Los Alamos Nature Center Planetarium

on November 22, 2018 - 7:34am

Join astronomer Rick Wallace at 7 p.m., Friday at the nature center planetarium to learn about the past and future of asteroid impacts. Courtesy/PEEC

Watch the full-dome film ‘National Parks Adventure’ at 2 p.m. Saturday at the nature center. Courtesy/PEEC

PEEC News:

Join astronomer Rick Wallace in the Los Alamos Nature Center’s planetarium this Friday, Nov. 23 at 7 p.m. to learn all about the past and future of asteroid impacts and threats.

Audience members will watch the full-dome film “Incoming!” at this event and enjoy an audio-visual presentation from Wallace on the nature of

Researchers Discover How ‘Cryptic’ Connections In Disease Transmission Influence Epidemics

on November 21, 2018 - 3:13pm
Researchers Kate Langwig, Joseph Hoyt and Jennifer Redell tag bats with fluorescent dust and observed their movements to track hidden connections that can spread disease within and between bat species. Courtesy/Virginia Tech
 
VIRGINIA TECH News:
 
Diseases have repeatedly spilled over from wildlife to humans, causing local to global epidemics, such as HIV/AIDS, Ebola, SARS and Nipah.
 
A new study by researchers of disease transmission in bats has broad implications for understanding hidden or “Cryptic” connections that can spread diseases between species and lead to large-scale

LANL: Eight Los Alamos Projects Win R&D 100 Awards

on November 20, 2018 - 8:16am

Eight LANL projects win R&D 100 Awards at R&D Magazine’s annual ceremony. Courtesy photo
 
LANL News:
 
Eight Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies win R&D 100 Awards at R&D Magazine’s annual ceremony in Orlando, Fla. Three of the inventions also win Special Recognition Awards, including a Gold award for corporate social responsibility.
 
“The Laboratory’s eight R&D 100 award winners show how scientific excellence in the name of national security can also benefit society as a whole,” Laboratory Director Thom Mason said.

AGU: Winter Temperatures Linked To Increased Crime

on November 17, 2018 - 9:54am
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Milder winter weather increased regional crime rates in the United States over the past several decades, according to new research that suggests crime is related to temperature’s effect on daily activities.
 
A new study published in GeoHealth, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, finds U.S. crime rates are linked to warmer temperatures, and this relationship follows a seasonal pattern.
 
The findings support the theory that three major ingredients come together to bring about crime: a motivated offender, a suitable target, and the absence of a

Science On Tap: Materials At Mesoscale Nov. 19

on November 16, 2018 - 7:30am
Dana Dattelbaum
 
LACDC News:
 
Join the Bradbury Science Museum and the Los Creative District at 5:30 p.m., Monday, Nov. 19 at UnQuarked Wine Room for the next Science On Tap.
 
Dana Dattelbaum, program manager for the Dynamic Materials Properties Campaign, and an R&D Scientist within M division at Los Alamos National Laboratory, will be presenting about work she’s leading at the Lab focused on materials at the mesoscale…that’s the spatial scale where a material’s structure strongly influences its macroscopic behaviors, like strength and durability.
 
Dattelbaum's experiments in shock

AGU: New Study Finds Half World’s Annual Precipitation Falls In Just 12 Days

on November 16, 2018 - 7:26am
Shown here is TRMM’s long term rainfall data merged with other satellites’ rain data from 40N to 40S latitude. The colors show the average of all the monthly rain averages from 1998 to 2010. Courtesy/Precipitation Processing System/NASA Goddard
 
Analysis of rainfall across the globe between 1999 and 2014 found that the median time it took for half of a year’s precipitation to fall was just 12 days. A quarter of annual precipitation fell in just six days, and three-quarters fell in 27 days. Courtesy UCAR/Simmi Sinha
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C.

Los Alamos School Board Meeting Summary

on November 16, 2018 - 6:56am

Standing from left, Los Alamos Heart Council Chair Phil Gursky, Fire Chief Troy Hughes and LAMC CEO John Whiteside donate an AED to provide potentially life-saving first aid for students and spectators at Sullivan Field. Courtesy photo

School Board member Stephen Boerigter listens as Los Alamos High School science teachers Debbie Grothaus and Stephanie Mitchell present information about the transition to Next Generation Science Standards in classroom instruction. Courtesy photo

LAPS News:

The Los Alamos Public School’s Board met for a regular school board meeting Tuesday, Nov.

LANL Profile: Physicist Donald Sandoval Is A Master Of The Loom

on November 15, 2018 - 8:22am
Donald Sandoval is a fifth generation weaver. Courtesy/LANL

Donald Sandoval works in the laboratory’s Primary Physics Group. Courtesy/LANL
 
LANL News:
 
Donald Sandoval, of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Primary Physics group, stands before a loom made by his father and weaves a tapestry. The weaving process itself is not too complicated but does take time, so Sandoval’s mind tends to wander. His thoughts often venture to his day job as a mechanical engineer supporting the Lab’s national security mission.

Stump PEEC’s Astronomers At Planetarium Friday

on November 15, 2018 - 8:05am
PEEC News:
 
The community is invited to test its knowledge of astronomy this Friday evening at the Los Alamos Nature Center’s planetarium during a “Stump the Astronomers!” panel.
 
This event begins at 7 p.m., Nov. 16 and will feature 10 local astronomers. Bring along the toughest astronomy-related questions and get ready for an evening of fun.
 
Astronomer Rick Wallace will be the MC for the evening and the panel will include Paul Arendt, Steve Becker, Chick Keller, Akkana Peck, Dave North, Dan Reisenfeld, Jonas Lippuner, Jonah Miller and Peter Polko.

AGU: Powerful Solar Storm Likely Detonated Mines During Vietnam War

on November 15, 2018 - 7:50am
A solar flare bursts off the left limb of the sun in this image captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory. Courtesy/NASA/SDO/Goddard/Wiessinger
 
AGU News:
 
A strong solar storm in 1972 caused widespread disturbances to satellites and spacecraft, and may have led to the detonation of mines during the Vietnam War, according to new research showing the event may have been a more devastating solar storm than previously thought.
 
In a new study in Space Weather, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, researchers pieced together data and historical records related to the solar activity

Experience Mars InSight Landing At NMMNH&S

on November 14, 2018 - 6:59am
Courtesy/NASA
 
NASA News:
 
ALBUQUERQUE NASA exploration landings on Mars are always exciting events, and the next one will touchdown Nov. 26, 2018.
 
The New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science will host a landing party that day from 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Learn about the latest mission to study the interior of Mars during a live NASA broadcast. Mars-related hands-on activities, videos, and local solar system experts will also be available.
 
Mars InSight will arrive on Mars at around 1 p.m. MST, Nov.

World Futures: Artificial Intelligence – Part Two

on November 13, 2018 - 5:14am
By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute
 
In the last column we looked at the “human” machine in exploring intelligence and established that it takes roughly 18 years to program the machine to function in humanity and that learning by the complex computer called the brain never ceases until the machine fails completely.
 
It is worthwhile to note that the earliest members of the genus homo, of which we are a part, dates back over two million years and fossils of anatomically modern humans are about 200,000 years old. It took us a long, long time to get to where we are today.

STEM Boomerang Planned In Albuquerque Dec. 20

on November 12, 2018 - 5:56am
STEM BOOMERANG News:
 
ALBUQUERQUE — For the second year in a row, business, academic and economic development and government leaders from the city, state and region will converge at The University of New Mexico meet with recent, highly-trained STEM professionals who are in and out of New Mexico.
 
The purpose of the STEM Boomerang is to connect the dots between the many highly-paid job opportunities that exist in New Mexico in the science, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM) and other technical areas and graduates from New Mexico who may wrongly believe that the state has little

HSNW: Unhackable Computers

on November 12, 2018 - 5:52am

Unhackable computer under development with $3.6M DARPA grant. Courtesy/U-M

HSNW News:

  • Relying on firmware security rather than software patches

By turning computer circuits into unsolvable puzzles, a University of Michigan team aims to create an unhackable computer with a new $3.6 million grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

Todd Austin, U-M professor of computer science and engineering, leads the project, called MORPHEUS.

LAHS Project Y Team Host Women In STEM Night

on November 9, 2018 - 10:37am

Dr. Mandie Gehring speaks to LAHS students Thursday about ‘Finding Your Superpower, a Guide to STEM’ at the Project Y STEM Center. Courtesy photo

LAHS News:

The Los Alamos High School Robotics Team, Project Y, hosted a talk Thursday by Dr. Mandie Gehring at the Project Y STEM Center on “Finding Your Superpower, a Guide to STEM” to LAHS students.

Dr. Gehring discussed her career in nuclear physics, why it is fun to work at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the challenges she faced to obtain her PhD, and generally shared her passion about physics with the high school students.

The talk was

World Futures: Artificial Intelligence – Part One

on November 8, 2018 - 10:56am

By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute

At the end of the last column I stated that this week we would begin looking at artificial intelligence or AI. It was my belief that writing a bit (or byte) about AI would be easy, after all the term is used everywhere in advertising, it tells me what I like to watch on Netflix, and it is essential for science fiction such as RUR – Russumovi Univerzaini Roboti or “Rossum’s Universal Robots.” But what is AI in reality? Let’s start with artificial.


Going to the cell phone that tries to control me, I looked up “artificial.” From Google,

LANL Launches Efficient Mission Centric Computing Consortium; DDN Joins Ultra-Scale Computing Quest

on November 8, 2018 - 9:49am

Los Alamos National Laboratory recently formed the Efficient Mission Centric Computing Consortium (EMC3) to investigate ultra-scale computing architectures and systems. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

 

Los Alamos National Laboratory recently formed the Efficient Mission Centric Computing Consortium (EMC3) to investigate ultra-scale computing architectures, systems and environments that can achieve higher efficiencies in extreme-scale mission-centric computing.

 

“We are excited about EMC3 and seek partnerships with high performance computing (HPC) technology providers and consumers that are

Los Alamos National Laboratory: Levitating Particles Could Lift Nuclear Detective Work

on November 8, 2018 - 9:35am
LANL News:
 
Laser-based ‘optical tweezers’ could levitate uranium and plutonium particles, thus allowing the measurement of nuclear recoil during radioactive decay.
 
This technique, proposed by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory, provides a new method for conducting the radioactive particle analysis essential to nuclear forensics.
 
“Our idea relies on trapping a particle using ‘optical tweezers,’ a technique which is the subject of this year’s Nobel prize in Physics,” said Alonso Castro of the Lab’s Actinide Analytical Chemistry group, one of the authors of a new paper in

UA: Aging A Flock Of Stars In Wild Duck Cluster

on November 8, 2018 - 7:51am
UA News:
 
TUCSON, Ariz. — Do star clusters harbor many generations of stars or just one? Scientists have long searched for an answer and, thanks to the University of Arizona's MMT telescope, found one in the Wild Duck Cluster, where stars spin at different speeds, disguising their common age.
 
In a partnership between the UA and the Korean Astronomy and Space Science Institute, a team of Korean and Belgian astronomers used UA instruments to solve a puzzle about flocks of stars called open clusters.
 
Astronomers have long believed that many open clusters consist of a single

AGU: Scientists Theorize New Origin For Earth’s Water

on November 7, 2018 - 9:15am
Artist’s conception of the dust and gas surrounding a newly formed planetary system. Courtesy/NASA
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON — Earth’s water may have originated from both asteroidal material and gas left over from the formation of the Sun, according to new research. The new finding could give scientists important insights about the development of other planets and their potential to support life.
 
In a new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, researchers propose a new theory to address the long-standing mystery of where

Los Alamos National Laboratory Pursues Efficient Computing With Cray, Marvell, And Arm

on November 6, 2018 - 7:28am
Los Alamos National Laboratory. Courtesy/LANL
 
LANL News:
 
In a drive to significantly boost usable operations per watt, per dollar and per development hour for extreme-scale computing, Los Alamos National Laboratory is running classified simulation codes in support of the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Stockpile Stewardship Program on the new Cray® XC50™ system with Marvell® ThunderX2® processors.  
 
The collaboration with Cray Inc., funded by the NNSA’s Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, integrates the Marvell ThunderX2 processors with Cray’s proven networking

SFI: Lecture Features Michelle Girvan Nov. 13

on November 3, 2018 - 6:11am

Michelle Girvan

SFI News:

Santa Fe Institute (SFI) hosts "Harnessing Chaos and Predicting the Unpredictable with Artificial Intelligence" with Michelle Girvan at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 13, at The Lensic Performing Arts Center, 211. W. San Francisco St. in Santa Fe.

In recent years, machine learning methods such as "deep learning" have proven enormously successful for tasks such as image classification and voice recognition.

Despite their effectiveness for big-data classification problems, these methods have had limited success predicting "chaotic" systems like those we see in

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