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Earth May Be 140 Years Away From Reaching Carbon Levels Not Seen In 56 Million Years

on February 21, 2019 - 6:42am

A new study shows humans are pumping carbon dioxide into the atmosphere at a rate nine to 10 times higher than the greenhouse gas was emitted during a global warming event 56 million years ago that made the oceans more acidic and drove some marine species extinct. Courtesy/AGU
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Total human carbon dioxide emissions could match those of Earth’s last major greenhouse warming event in fewer than five generations, new research finds.
 
A new study finds humans are pumping carbon dioxide into the atmosphere at a rate nine to 10 times higher than the greenhouse

LAPS Students Heading To Regional Science Fair

on February 20, 2019 - 3:57pm

Lillian Petersen and Garyk Brixi were named Grand Award in the Environmental Science Senior Division for their project, ‘A Novel Computational Tool to Inform Cost-Effective Nutrition Interventions in Sub-Saharan Africa’. They will next compete at the Northeastern New Mexico Regional Science & Engineering Fair March 2 at New Mexico Highlands University. Courtesy/LAPS

LAPS News:

Los Alamos Public Schools is sending 50 students to the Northeastern New Mexico Regional Science & Engineering Fair March 2 at New Mexico Highlands University in Las Vegas, NM.

Students qualified for the regional

LANL: Collaboration Opportunity To Harness Top Algae Strains For Bioenergy

on February 20, 2019 - 3:16pm

LANL and partners are inviting the algae industry and academia to contribute to research to find the best algae strains for biofuels and bioproducts. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • DOE project aims to boost productivity, lower cost of algae biofuels and bioproducts

Los Alamos National Laboratory and partners are inviting the algae industry and academia to contribute to research to find the best algae strains for biofuels and bioproducts and to reduce the cost of producing bioenergy from algae feedstocks. 

The U.S.

Explore Wonders Of ‘Big Honking Telescopes’ Friday

on February 20, 2019 - 2:54pm

Explore the wonders of big telescopes at 7 p.m. Friday at the Los Alamos Nature Center. Courtesy/PEEC

PEEC News:

 

Explore the wonders of “Big Honking Telescopes” this Friday, Feb. 22 at the Los Alamos Nature Center planetarium. Join Dave North and Akkana Peck to learn why we build extremely large telescopes and what they have told us about our universe. This talk begins at 7 p.m. and is free to attend.

 

Most of what we know about the larger universe is the result of ever larger and better optics.

‘River Of Stars’ Streaming Through Milky Way ... Hiding In Plain Sight For 1 Billion Years

on February 19, 2019 - 1:56pm

In this stereographic projection, the Milky Way curves around the entire image in an arc, with the newly discovered river of stars displayed in red and covering almost the entire southern Galactic hemisphere. Courtesy/Astronomy & Astrophysics

LiveScience News:

One billion years ago, a cluster of stars formed in our galaxy. Since then, that cluster has whipped four long circles around the edge of the Milky Way. In that time, the Milky Way's gravity has stretched that cluster out from a blob into a long stellar stream.

Cornell Professor: ‘Carl Sagan, Vatican Astronomers, And A Life Of Science And Faith’ At IHM Wednesday

on February 18, 2019 - 7:10am

Cornell University Professor Jonathan Lunine

IHM News:

Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish will host Cornell University Professor Jonathan Lunine for a presentation on the intersection of faith and science and his journey to the Catholic Faith. 

Professor Lunine is the David C. Duncan Professor in the Physical Sciences at Cornell University, director of the Cornell Center for Astrophysics and Planetary Science, and vice president of the Society of Catholic Scientists.

The community is invited to attend this presentation at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 20 in the Parish Hall at 3700 Canyon Road.

Bradbury Science Museum Association Launches STEM Education Docent Program This Month

on February 17, 2019 - 10:38am
BSMA News:
 
The Bradbury Science Museum Association (BSMA) is looking for volunteers for their latest endeavor, a docent program dedicated to supporting educational programs at the Bradbury Science Museum.
 
If you’re interested in giving of your time and expertise alongside the Bradbury staff, have a passion for science or education, enjoy working with school-aged children and adolescents, and can pass a background check, the BSMA’s new STEM Education Docent program may be a great fit for you.
 
More information and application forms are available here.

NNSA Approves ‘Critical Decision 1’ For Advanced Sources And Detectors Project, A New Tool To Advance Stockpile Stewardship

on February 15, 2019 - 8:50am
An abbreviated concept illustration shows a portion of the ASD accelerator and target vessel. Courtesy/LANL
 
LANL News:
 
The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has approved Critical Decision-1 (CD-1) for the Advanced Sources and Detectors Project (ASD), a cornerstone of the Enhanced Capabilities for Subcritical Experiments portfolio (ECSE).
 
ASD is a proposed 20-million electron volt (MeV) accelerator that will generate X-ray images, or radiographs, of subcritical implosion experiments for the nuclear weapons program.
 
“The ECSE portfolio is designed to better

NOAA Announces Arrival Of El Nino

on February 15, 2019 - 8:23am
Difference from average sea surface temperatures during January 2019 at the equator in the tropical Pacific. Courtesy/NOAA
 
NOAA News:
 
NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center issued an El Nino Advisory today, indicating the climate pattern has taken effect and is likely to continue through the spring.
 
While the El Nino is expected to be weak, it may bring wetter conditions across the southern half of the U.S. during the coming months.
 
“El Nino conditions across the equatorial Pacific have come together and we can now announce its arrival,” said Mike Halpert, deputy director, NOAA’s

Can Anyone Stump PEEC’s Team Of Professional Astronomers In Planetarium 7 p.m. Friday?

on February 14, 2019 - 5:09pm

Try to stump PEEC’s professional astronomers at 7 p.m. this Friday, Feb. 15 in the planetarium. Courtesy/PEEC

 

PEEC News:

 

Do you think you have what it takes to stump a panel of PEEC’s expert astronomers? Then come to the Los Alamos Nature Center’s planetarium Friday, Feb. 15 for a “Stump the Astronomers” panel!

 

The fun starts at 7 p.m. Bring your most difficult astronomy-related questions and put the professionals to the test!

 

Peter Polko will be the M.C. for the evening.

LANL: World's Finest Gold Specimen Probed With Los Alamos Neutrons

on February 13, 2019 - 11:23am

The Ram’s Horn wire gold specimen Courtesy/Harvard University

LANL News:

  • Unraveling a 132-year-old gold wire structure mystery

Using neutron characterization techniques, a team of scientists have peered inside one of the most unique examples of wire gold, understanding for the first time the specimen's structure and possible formation process.

The 263 gram, 12 centimeter tall specimen, known as the Ram's Horn, belongs to the collection of the Mineralogical and Geological Museum Harvard University (MGMH).

"Almost nothing other than the existence of the specimen is known about wire gold,"

NMHU: Santiana Marrujo Accepted To Eight Chemistry Doctoral Programs Across The Country

on February 12, 2019 - 6:20am
Santiana Marrujo
 
NMHU News:
 
LAS VEGAS, NM A New Mexico Highlands University chemistry graduate has her pick of eight doctoral programs around the country.
 
In December, Santiana Marrujo’s letters of acceptance started rolling in from Ph.D. programs at Notre Dame, Purdue University, Iowa State University, Colorado State University, Brigham Young University, Kansas State University, New Mexico State University and UC–Santa Barbara.
 
Every university offered Marrujo a full ride for her doctoral education.

Heinrich On American Artificial Intelligence Initiative

on February 11, 2019 - 3:25pm

U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich

From the Office of U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich:

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.), a member of the Senate Armed Services and Senate Intelligence committees, issued the following statement on the executive order to be signed today launching the American Artificial Intelligence (AI) initiative:

“I welcome the administration’s announcement to invest more in the research and development of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and to build a workforce that is prepared to take on the enormous changes that will come as a result of this technology.

National Science Foundation Awards $224,780 Grant To Tibbar Plasma Technologies Of Los Alamos

on February 9, 2019 - 8:39am

NSF News:

Tibbar Plasma Technologies, Inc. (TPTI) received a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I grant of $224,780 from the National Science Foundation Feb. 1 to develop a plasma heat engine for efficient production of fusion energy.

Over the next year, TPTI will be exploring the properties of oscillating plasmas with the goal of creating an experimental fusion device.

Confining plasma has always been a significant challenge in the development of fusion energy, but Tibbar’s approach is radically different from other fusion systems.

2019 Lectures & Curator’s Coffee Series: ‘The Brain: It’s More Than You Think’ Saturday Feb. 23

on February 9, 2019 - 7:56am
2019 Lectures & Curator’s Coffee Series: The Brain: It’s More Than You Think Feb. 23 at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science. Courtesy/NMMNHS 
 
NMMNHS News:
 
ALBUQUERQUE As part of the programming associated with the new traveling exhibition Brain: The Inside Story, which opens Saturday Feb. 23 at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, the museum’s 2019 Lectures & Curator’s Coffee Series theme is, “The Brain: It’s More Than You Think.”
 
Brain: The Inside Story draws on research and technology to present recent findings in neuroscience, highlighting

Talk/Film On Dark Matter This Weekend In Planetarium

on February 7, 2019 - 11:29am

Explore the nature of Dark Matter and Dark Energy this weekend at the Los Alamos Nature Center’s planetarium. Astrophysicist Galen Gisler discusses the nature of these phenomena at 7 p.m. Friday and the full-dome film ‘Dark Matter Mystery’ will play at 2 p.m. Saturday. Courtesy/PEEC

PEEC News:

Unearth the mysteries of Dark Matter and Dark Energy this weekend at the Los Alamos Nature Center’s planetarium.

Astrophysicist Galen Gisler will give a talk called “The Dark Side of the Universe” at 7 p.m. Friday that will explore these phenomena.

SFI Lecture: ‘Networks Thinking Themselves’ Feb. 12

on February 6, 2019 - 9:32am

The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat/ADAGP, Paris/ARS, New York 2014; (www.thebroad.org)

SFI News:

Neuroscientist Danielle S. Bassett

The Santa Fe Institute presents its first SFI Community Lecture of the 2019 season: “Networks Thinking Themselves” by neuroscientist Danielle S. Bassett. The lecture is 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 12 at The Lensic Performing Arts Center, 211 W. San Francisco St. in Santa Fe.

We are all embedded in multiple, ever-changing networks — the network of colliding particles in the universe, the interacting flows in Earth’s atmosphere, the highways and city streets we

‘Empty Trash Bag’ Orbiting Earth In Strange Way

on February 5, 2019 - 9:43am
Lots of space debris is orbiting Earth, including non-functional satellites. Courtesy/NASA
 
LIVE SCIENCE News:
 
A bizarre object orbiting Earth is reminding astronomers of an empty trash bag.
 
The unusual satellite is trekking around the planet in an almost absurd ellipse, dipping as close as 372.8 miles (600 kilometers) from the surface and then swinging out to a distance of 334,460 miles (538,261 km), or 1.4 times the average distance of the Earth to the moon.
 
According to Northolt Branch Observatories in London, the object is a light piece of material left over from a rocket

AGU: Early Spring Rain Boosts Methane From Thawing Permafrost By 30 Percent

on February 5, 2019 - 8:49am
Grassy plants called sedges grow across the surface of the bog that Neumann and her team studied. Photo by Rebecca Neumann/University of Washington
 
A UW-led team has found that early spring rainfall warms up a thawing permafrost bog in Alaska and promotes the growth of plants and methane-producing microbes. Photo by Rebecca Neumann/University of Washington
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Arctic permafrost is thawing as the Earth warms due to climate change. In some cases scientists predict that this thawing soil will release increasing amounts of methane, a potent greenhouse gas,

Science On Tap: Latest Innovations In Fuel-Cell Research At LANL Discussed At UnQuarked Feb. 11

on February 5, 2019 - 5:58am
Dr. Yu Seung Kim of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Materials Synthesis and Integrated Devices Group. Courtesy photo
 
Los Alamos Creative District News:
 
Join the Bradbury Science Museum and the Los Alamos Creative District for Science On Tap at 5:30 p.m., Monday, Feb. 11, at UnQuarked Wine Room.
 
This discussion will feature Dr. Yu Seung Kim of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Materials Synthesis and Integrated Devices Group. This event replaces the previously scheduled Feb. 25 Science On Tap.
 
Fuel-cell research has been a hot topic at Los Alamos since the 1970s.

AGU: Passing Aircraft Wring Extra Snow And Rain Out Of Clouds

on February 3, 2019 - 4:31pm
A radar station at Kerava, Finland, recorded a trail of heightened precipitation—the yellow streak to the left—on the aircraft approach path to Helsinki-Vantaa airport (EFHK) in March 2009. Courtesy AGU/Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres
 
Hole-punch’ clouds like this one seen over Houston, Minn. in November 2014, occur when airplanes fly through a thin cloud of supercooled water vapor, causing water droplets to freeze. The tiny crystals fall, leaving a hole to mark the plane’s passage.

NMHU: New Geologic Research Instrument Opens Up Exciting New Research Opportunities

on February 1, 2019 - 8:51am

Highlands geology professor Michael Petronis installs a new instrument in the university’s Paleomagnetic Laboratory. Courtesy/HU
 
By RICK LOFFREDO
New Mexico Highlands University

LAS VEGAS, N.M. – A new geologic research instrument at New Mexico Highlands University will open up opportunities for student research that will advance knowledge across the science disciplines of geology, chemistry and physics.

Thanks to a $550,000 grant from the National Science Foundation, Highlands has added a superconducting rock magnetometer to its state-of-the-art Paleomagnetic – Rock Magnetic

Perfect Pi Day Celebration In Los Alamos March 14

on February 1, 2019 - 8:23am

COMMUNITY News:

The Los Alamos Youth Activity Centers, a program of Los Alamos Family Council, will host the first ever communitywide Perfect Pi Day Celebration.

The March 14 event is 5-6 p.m. at the Ashley Pond Park Pavilion in Los Alamos.

The Pi and Pie event includes a silent auction to bid on pies from local restaurants and bakeries, and the sale of raffle tickets for the chance to pie local celebrities.

Youth Activity Center members will host free pi friendly activities throughout the afternoon and receive one free raffle ticket for the celebrity pie activity.

To volunteer your face

LANL: RFP Issued For New Supercomputer ‘Crossroads’

on February 1, 2019 - 7:58am
Los Alamos National Laboratory. CourtesyLANL
 
LANL News:
 
The next big supercomputer is out for bid. A Request For Proposal (RFP) was released Thursday for Crossroads, a high-performance computer that will support the nation’s Stockpile Stewardship Program.
 
The RFP is a joint effort of the New Mexico Alliance for Computing at Extreme Scale (ACES), a collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories.
 
“Los Alamos National Laboratory is proud to serve as the home of Crossroads,” LANL Director Thom Mason said.

LANL Director Thom Mason Reflects On First 90 Days

on January 31, 2019 - 9:39am
LANL Director Thom Mason. Photo by Bonnie J. Gordon/ladailypost.com
 
By CAROL A. CLARK
Los Alamos Daily Post

Thom Mason today completes his first 90 days at the helm of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

During an interview in his office last Thursday, Mason spoke of his admiration for the scientists, engineers and staff at the Lab and his gratitude to the community for its warm welcome. He also touched on the best thing about his job as well as the challenges.

“During these first 90 days one thing that has really struck me as I’ve visited the various areas of the

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