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SFI Public Lecture: Randomness Everywhere Feb. 27

on February 19, 2018 - 2:05pm

‘Cardsharps’ by Michelangelo Caravaggio. Courtesy/SFI

SFI News:

The Santa Fe Institute (SFI) presents a Community Event: Randomness Everywhere with Sid Redner at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 27 at The Lensic Performing Arts Center, 211 W. San Francisco St. in Santa Fe.

Randomness underlies events that we encounter every day. From the ups and downs of stock prices to the likelihood of winning at gambling, understanding randomness can help us make sense of our experiences and resolve apparent paradoxes.

In the first community lecture of SFI's 2018 series, Sid Redner  presents an introduction to

Science On Tap: ATHENA & Surrogate Human Organs

on February 17, 2018 - 10:20am

Creative District News:

New drugs are under constant development but most fail in clinical trials. Why do so many drugs pass animal testing, but fail in Phase 1 clinical trials in humans? Are animal models of human diseases ultimately really a good model for humans?

Enter ATHENA. ATHENA, which stands for Advanced Tissue-engineered Human External Network Analyzer, is designed to simulate organ systems (such as liver, heart, lung, and kidney) and can be used as a first-line test for potential toxicity analysis since the system can mimic the response of actual human organs.

Recordings Spout Secrets Behind Blue Whale Behavior

on February 13, 2018 - 6:38am
A blue whale surfaces off the coast of Southern California, showing the attached tag that records its calls and pressure changes during dives. Researchers use these tags to explore behavioral links between diving and song production. Courtesy/Ana Širović.
 
 
AGU News:
 
PORTLAND, Ore.

AGU: Research Uncovers Mysterious Lives Of Narwhals

on February 12, 2018 - 6:11am
A pod of narwhals in Melville Bay, Greenland. New research may shed a bit of light on these enigmatic marine mammals. Courtesy/Kristin Laidre
 
AGU News:
 
PORTLAND, Ore. — Narwhals are some of the most elusive creatures in the ocean, spending most of their lives in deep water far from shore.
 
But research being presented at the 2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting in Portland Monday may shed a bit of light on these enigmatic marine mammals.
 
New research shows narwhals may prefer to congregate near unique glacier fjords with thick ice fronts and low to moderate calving activity, where

EM Contractor N3B Hosts Open House

on February 7, 2018 - 2:13pm

John Tauxe of Neptune Company, left, and Danny Katzman, technical program director at Los Alamos National Laboratory chat during Monday's N3B open house in Cottonwood on the Greens at the Los Alamos County Golf Course. Photo by Maire O'Neill/ladailypost.com

Los Alamos County Attorney Alvin Leaphart, right, and Assistant County Attorney Kevin Powers at Monday's N3B open house at Cottonwood on the Greens. Photo by Maire O'Neill/ladailypost.com

Los Alamos County Council Chair David Izraelevitz, left, and Joe Legare, environment remediation manager for N3B chat at Monday's open house.

Photovoltaics Class Takes Readings On Campus

on February 1, 2018 - 6:40am

Ryder Devenhall marks the shadows as seen in the pyranometer while Jesse Hesch and Mitch Frank look on at UNM-LA. Students in Don Davis’s Photovoltaics class at the college use a pyranometer to do solar site analysis on campus. By taking readings at various locations, they can measure solar obstructions and chart the overall available solar resource. Photo by Nancy Coombs/UNM-LA

LANL: Novel Computational Biology Model Accurately Describes Dynamics Of Gene Expression

on January 31, 2018 - 10:10am
Yen Ting Lin of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Theoretical Biology and Biophysics Group is working with researchers at Duke University to develop mathematical models that may help explain the role that gene expression plays in conserving circadian rhythms in biological organisms. The research was highlighted in Royal Society Interface. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

Using a simple analytical framework for random events within a predictable system, computational biologists have found a new way to accurately model certain forms of gene expression, including the body’s 24-hour internal clock.

2018 Summer Physics Camp For Young Women

on January 29, 2018 - 9:19am

AGU: Phosphorus Pollution Reaching Dangerous Levels Worldwide, New Study Finds

on January 29, 2018 - 6:14am
Algal blooms can present problems for ecosystems and human society. A new study suggests freshwater bodies in areas with high water pollution levels are likely to suffer from excess nutrient levels that can lead to algal blooms. Courtesy/Felix Andrews (Floybix) – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Man-made phosphorus pollution is reaching dangerously high levels in freshwater basins around the world, according to new research.
 
new study published in Water Resources Research, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, estimated the global

NMMNHS Lecture: Red Rocks From Earth To Mars

on January 27, 2018 - 9:07am

New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science presents an evening lecture, ‘Red Rocks from Earth to Mars’ that looks at evidence for water-deposited sedimentary rocks discovered on Mars and small iron concretions called ‘blueberries’ found on the Red Planet. Courtesy/NMMNHS

NMMNHS News:

ALBUQUERQUE – Evidence for water-deposited sedimentary rocks discovered on Mars by the NASA Rovers, and small iron concretions called “blueberries” found on the Red Planet, will be discussed by University of Utah professor Marjorie A. Chan, Ph.D.

The lecture is 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday, Jan.

AGU: Stored Heat Released From Ocean Largely Responsible For Recent Streak Of Record Hot Years

on January 27, 2018 - 6:17am
Pacific Ocean sea surface temperatures, measured here in November 2015, surged during the 2014-2015 El Niño. New research finds this El Niño released excess heat stored in the Pacific Ocean since the 1990s. Courtesy/NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory.
 
AGU News:
 
Global temperatures spiked during the record warm years of 2014 to 2016 largely because El Niño released an unusually large amount of heat generated by greenhouse gas emissions and stored in the Pacific Ocean, a new study finds.
 
2014, 2015 and 2016 were the warmest consecutive years since temperature records began

Experts To Preview Launch Of NOAA’s GOES-S Satellite

on January 26, 2018 - 8:21am
Technicians in the clean room at Astrotech Space Operations in Titusville, Fla. closely inspect and continue working to prepare NOAA's GOES-S for its March 1 launch. Credit/NOAA
 
NOAA News:
 
Top officials from NOAA, NASA and the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection will hold a media teleconference to discuss how NOAA’s GOES-S, the second in a series of next-generation geostationary weather satellites, will help provide faster, more accurate data for tracking lightning, storm systems, wildfires, dense fog and other hazards that threaten the western U.S., Hawaii and

LANL Scientists Conduct Study To Help Predict Diseases ... Seek Volunteers In Los Alamos County

on January 26, 2018 - 7:39am

Researchers are looking for volunteers in Los Alamos County to participate in a respiratory pathogen study and provide information and swab samples. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate and the Medical Associates of Northern New Mexico are looking for volunteers in Los Alamos County to participate in a respiratory pathogen study and provide information and swab samples.

“The goal of this study is to develop a system that can predict future emergence of infections, propose the best public health

Los Alamos Has Viome!

on January 25, 2018 - 10:59am
From left, Viome’s Head of Project Management Miranda Intrator, President Deepak Savadatti, Chief Science Officer Momo Vuyisich and Research Associate Andy Hatch at the lab Monday afternoon at 81 Camino Entrada in Los Alamos. Photo by Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com
 
Viome employees gather with Chief Science Officer Momo Vuyisich, seated third from right, to celebrate the company’s first year anniversary Saturday evening at Cottonwood on the Greens at the Los Alamos Golf Course. Photo by Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com
 
By CAROL A. CLARK
Los Alamos Daily Post

LANS Fee Impacted By Plutonium Air Shipments

on January 25, 2018 - 9:23am
By MAIRE O’NEILL
Los Alamos Daily Post

Los Alamos National Security, LLC earned 89 percent of the total available fee for FY2017, or $44.6 million out of a possible $50.3 million, a National Nuclear Safety Administration spokesman said Wednesday.

The LANL contractor is graded annually for its performance.

'Women, Science And Project Y' Exhibit At Los Alamos County Municipal Building

on January 24, 2018 - 7:52am
Frances Dunne setting an explosives point in the spring of 1945 at R Site or Two Mile Mesa. Courtesy/Los Alamos Historical Society Photo Archives

Dorothea Hermann, left, and Lyda Speck in their crowded Women’s Army Corps barracks in 1945. An unknown WAC is moving in the background. Courtesy/Vieira Collection, Los Alamos Historical Society Photo Archives
 
By AIMEE SLAUGHTER
Los Alamos Historical Society
 
The next time you’re in the Los Alamos County Municipal Building, be sure to check out the new exhibit from the Los Alamos History Museum, “Women, Science, and Project Y.”
 
Ever

DEA Speeds Up Application Process For Research On Schedule I Drugs

on January 20, 2018 - 6:16am
DEA News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C.  The Drug Enforcement Administration is streamlining the application process for researchers who study or wish to study Schedule I substances not currently approved for medical use. Schedule I drugs are defined as drugs, substances, or chemicals with no accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse, such as ecstasy or LSD.
 
By taking the process online, both existing and new researchers can submit their applications through a dedicated web portal (https://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/drugreg/index.html), improving efficiency and security.
 
The

NNSA Collaborates With Global Healthcare Company To Complete Conversion Of Mo-99 Production To LEU-Based Process

on January 19, 2018 - 7:35am
NNSA News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C.  The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Wednesday announced that Curium, a global healthcare company, has completed the conversion of its molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) production process from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU).
 
This conversion to LEU represents a key milestone in the global effort to end the use of HEU in Mo-99 production. Mo-99 is the most widely used medical radioisotope for nuclear imaging and is used in approximately 40,000 patient procedures daily in the United States.
 

DOE And NMED Hold Joint Meeting On Legacy Waste Clean-Up

on January 18, 2018 - 1:51pm

Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Office Manager Doug Hintze, right, and New Mexico Environment Department Hazardous Waste Bureau Chief John Kieling take notes as NNSA representative Arturo Duran answers questions from the audience during Tuesday evening's meeting hosted by DOE and NMED at the Los Alamos County Municipal Building. Duran earlier outlined milestones and targets for FY 2018 legacy waste clean-up. Photo by Maire O'Neill/ladailypost.com

Scene from the New Mexico Environment Department public information meeting on FY2018 Appendix B milestones and targets Tuesday evening

UC Rep Faces Tough Questions From Coalition Chair

on January 15, 2018 - 11:23am

UC Vice President for National Laboratories Kim Budil speaks to RCLC Board members Friday at Okway Owingeh Casino Resort Hotel. Photo by Maire O'Neill/ladailypost.com

 

 

By MAIRE O’NEILL

Los Alamos Daily Post

maire@ladailypost.com

 

University of California Vice President for National Laboratories Kim Budil told Regional Coalition of LANL Communities Board members during its meeting Friday at Ohkay Owingeh Casino Resort Hotel that circumstances on the ground are much better at Los Alamos National Laboratory since the incident in 2014 that caused the closure of the Waste Isolation

DOE Under Secretary For Science Visits Hanford Site

on January 12, 2018 - 6:36am
DOE Under Secretary for Science Paul Dabbar (center) dons protective clothing prior to entering the air lock of the 324 Building, located about 300 yards west of the Columbia River. Courtesy photo
 
DOE News:
 
RICHLAND, WA  DOE Under Secretary for Science Paul Dabbar spent his first working days of 2018 at the Hanford Site, emphasizing the importance of safety as he talked with EM officials, toured cleanup projects, and met with labor groups and others in the community. 
 
Dabbar visited three training facilities where workers practice using equipment in a non-hazardous environment

AGU: Study Finds First Direct Proof Of Ozone Hole Recovery Due To Chemicals Ban

on January 12, 2018 - 6:30am
A view of Earth’s atmosphere from space. A new study finds that levels of ozone-destroying chlorine are declining, resulting in less ozone depletion. Courtesy/NASA
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON D.C. — For the first time, scientists have shown through direct satellite observations of the ozone hole that levels of ozone-destroying chlorine are declining, resulting in less ozone depletion.
 
new study in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, shows the decline in chlorine, resulting from an international ban on chlorine-containing manmade chemicals called

Hintze And Glasco Present Talk On Chromium Plume

on January 11, 2018 - 8:24am

DOE EM Los Alamos Field Office Manager Doug Hintze discusses the Chromium Plume issue during Tuesday’s County Council meeting. Photo by Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com

DPU Manager Tim Glasco discusses the Chromium Plume issue. Photo by Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com

 

By MAIRE O’NEILL

Los Alamos Daily Post

maire@ladailypost.com

Los Alamos County Council members heard two messages Tuesday evening from Doug Hintze, manager of the Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Office and Tim Glasco, County Utilities manager during a presentation on the chromium plume issue

The first from Glasco

Lecture Series: Impact Of Recent Discoveries On Evolutionary Theories Jan. 19 - 20

on January 10, 2018 - 5:20pm

Lecture series speaker John Baumgardner

CALVARY CHAPEL News:

Is neo-Darwinism true? It is according to the National Academy of Sciences and the other professional science societies in our land. Yet the fields of molecular biology and genetics have been demonstrating conclusively for well over 20 years that the framework is untenable.  

The community is invited to a lecture series on origins to hear 10 major technical reasons why neo-Darwinism is counterfeit science. The lecture is free at Calvary Chapel at 580 North Mesa Road in Los Alamos.
 
For more Information, visit

Crowd Gathers For Nature On Tap At UnQuarked

on January 8, 2018 - 3:10pm

A crowd turned out Thursday evening for Nature on Tap  at UnQuarked in Central Park Square to hear local astronomers and astrophysicists Dr. Galen Gisler, Dr. Steve Becker and Dr. Paul Arendt provide an engaging discussion about gravitational waves, the creation of precious metals, black holes, neutron stars, the night sky and upcoming planetarium shows. Nature on Tap is part of a series of conversations about art, history, nature and science.

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