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Shin: $7 million Kiddie Pool With $34 Million Cash Cow

on December 7, 2017 - 9:41am
By LISA SHIN
Los Alamos

Earlier this year, Councilor Chris Chandler told us that what the voters would decide in the REC Bond election, would become the “Council’s marching orders.”

So I ask, was a $5 million or a $7 million kiddie pool the voters’ “marching orders”? A $5 million pool was questionable. But $7 million? Citizens voiced their opinions and made their voices heard on May 23, 2017. We had hoped that our County Council would vote on what the majority wanted. Democracy in action. Apparently, that was asking too much.

Further, Councilor Susan O’Leary told us that “if the bond fails, $7

Common Questions For Los Alamos History Museum

on December 7, 2017 - 7:59am
Gen. Leslies Groves thought Los Alamos would be easy to guard, and Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer loved the inspiring vistas. Courtesy photo
 
By HEATHER MCCLENAHAN
Los Alamos Historical Society
 
There are two common questions that visitors ask at the Los Alamos History Museum. Why was Los Alamos chosen for the Manhattan Project? and How did Bathtub Row get its name?
 
Those popular questions aren’t just from out-of- town visitors; they often come from our own residents, so here are the answers.
 
Los Alamos was an ideal location for a top-secret laboratory for the Manhattan Project.

Cinema Cindy Reviews 'Lady Bird'

on December 4, 2017 - 3:18pm
By CYNTHIA BIDDLECOMB
Los Alamos
 
“Lady Bird” is Greta Gerwig’s first solo venture into film writing and directing. It most assuredly won’t be her last! Lady Bird, though not quite autobiographical, is a heart-warming tale about a mother-daughter relationship, taking place in Gerwig’s hometown of Sacramento, California.
 
Lady Bird tells the story of high school senior Christine McPherson, who has given herself the name “Lady Bird”—“It’s my given name; I gave it to myself,” she says.
 
Convincing in the role of 17-year-old Lady Bird is Saoirse Ronan (star of the 2015 film, Brooklyn),

Fr. Glenn: Whatever Is Honorable

on December 3, 2017 - 6:32am

By Rev. Glenn Jones
Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church
Los Alamos

With all this sexual harassment stuff these days, we hesitate to click a news website or open a newspaper, for it means to receive yet another new revelation of some luminary who has strayed far from the path of propriety … followed by the almost inevitable “apology” … even though their malfeasance may have continued to the very time of being revealed. So … is he sorry for the behavior, or just sorry he was caught? One can’t help but wonder; one can’t help but doubt.

Pastor Granillo: He Is Coming

on December 3, 2017 - 6:07am
Pastor Raul Granillo
La Vista Church of the Nazarene
White Rock

When He returns is not as important as the fact that we are ready for Him when He does return. ―A.W. Tozer

My mom was a working, single mom. (For the record, these people are among the highest level of superheroes.) This meant that my siblings and I would often come home from school and find the house empty because mom had to go to work. We had a procedure in place for when this happened. We were to lock the doors, find the list that she left for us, and then call her to let her know we were all safely at home.

Amateur Naturalist: The Mathematical Symmetry Of Pine Cones

on December 2, 2017 - 7:55am
The shape of the pinecone bracts create eight spirals going outward and counter clockwise. Photo by Robert Dryja
 
The Mathematical Symmetry of Pine Cones
By ROBERT DRYJA
Amateur Naturalist
 
 
The shape of the pine cones lying on the ground below a tree provides a kind of predictability that is the complete opposite to predicting the youthfulness or maturity of a tree. A cone grows overlapping bracts that protect the developing seeds within. When the seeds mature, the bracts open. The seeds then may flutter away to germinate or become food for some animal or insect.
 
What

McQuiston: Did You Know Today’s Homes Burn Faster

on December 1, 2017 - 10:19am
By ALLEN MCQUISTON
The Jemez Agency
 
From building materials to furnishings, many of the things in your home likely aren’t as flame-resistant as those from yesteryear.
 
A fire in a modern home is a “perfect storm,” according to safety consulting and certification company UL (Underwriters Laboratories).
 
Larger homes, more open layouts, new construction materials and other factors mean fires burn more quickly, leaving less time for occupants to escape — and for firefighters to stop the flames. How much less time?

Stampeding Bull Market May Slow Down: Be Prepared

on December 1, 2017 - 9:34am
Provided by SHELLY A. WIEMANN
Financial Advisor
Edward Jones

As you know, we’ve been enjoying a long period of steadily rising stock prices. Of course, this bull market won’t last forever – and when it does start losing steam, you, as an investor, need to be prepared.

Before we look at how you can ready yourself for a new phase in the investment environment, let’s consider some facts about the current situation:

Length – This bull market, which began in 2009, is the second-oldest in the past 100 years – and it’s about twice as long as the average bull market.

Strength – Since the start of

Just One Thing To Do This Week: Be Enchanted

on December 1, 2017 - 8:57am
By MARY BETH MAASSEN
Los Alamos

The Land of Enchantment is a fitting moniker for New Mexico. The towering red rock mesas, the snowcapped peaks, dramatic cliffs and canyons.

Of all the activities and destinations that New Mexico has to offer, not one envelopes my heart and spirit quite like Light Among the Ruins, at the Jemez Historic Site (formerly the Jemez National Monument). It is always a mind-blowing, magical evening, and my favorite tradition.

It usually goes something like this:

We arrive in the Village of Jemez Springs in mid-afternoon to take advantage of the community activities

World Futures: Money, Trade, Value And Time Part 8

on December 1, 2017 - 7:33am
By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World
Futures Institute

In part seven of this series we ended with three types of money on the table: gold (and other precious metals), fiat money (paper notes or data entries on a cyber ledger) backed by a government entity, and bitcoins backed by trust in no one other than the users.

In all cases, value is accrued by perception and is essential for timely trade (in exchange for goods and services). And we use government controlled banking systems to facilitate the process except when the monetary medium is physical (paper money or gold) or non-government bits and

This Week At The Reel Deal

on November 30, 2017 - 12:35pm

Inspirational People: Sharing Positive Traits

on November 30, 2017 - 4:33am
By CAROL A. CLARK
Los Alamos Daily Post

A local resident revealed that he has held another person in town in high esteem – for years – yet never thought to mention it.

“I discovered early in the years I’ve served on boards and worked on community projects with her that she is keenly intelligent, impeccably mannered and always conducts herself on the highest ethical plane … yet it never occurred to me to tell her,” he said.

He was humbled to learn that she for as many years harbored similar opinions of him.

Weekly Fishing Report: Nov. 29

on November 29, 2017 - 2:20pm
By GEORGE MORSE
Sports and Outdoors
Los Alamos Daily Post
 
The weather remained unseasonably warm and dry last week. There are reports of changes in the weather for this coming week. Temperatures may drop to what would be normal for this time of year.
 
The fishing picked up at Abiquiu Lake last week and there were finally reports of trout being caught. This could be due to the recent stocking of fingerling rainbow trout. Larger predatory fish can be attracted to the area where these fish were stocked.

Home Country: Morning Coffee

on November 29, 2017 - 5:57am
Home Country
By SLIM RANDLES
 
“Ahhh! Coffee!” said our resident cowboy, Steve, raising his cup at the philosophy counter. “Let’s raise our cups to whichever Brazilian came up with this stuff.”
 
Very slowly, Herb Collins stood with his cup of coffee there in the midst of culture and education at the Mule Barn truck stop.
 
“Actually, Steve,” Herb said, in his most professorial tone, “his name was Kaldi. He lived in Ethiopia.” And here Herb grinned fiendlishly at Steve. “And he was a sheepherder!”
 
“No way, Herb!”
 
“The truth, cowboy, nothing but the truth.

Fr. Glenn: Forgive Us Our Trespasses…

on November 26, 2017 - 8:00am
By Rev. Glenn Jones
Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church
Los Alamos

Huh … Charles Manson died about a week ago. For those too young to remember, Manson was leader of a cult (“the Manson family”), which engaged in torture and murder back in the late 1960’s, but he fortunately was captured, his cult broken up and he had been in prison ever since … dying after many decades of incarceration at the age of 83.

Predictably, some headlines were vengeful and gloating; for example: “Make Room, Satan; Charles Manson is Finally Going to Hell”, and editorial cartoons were rife with depictions of

Cinema Cindy Reviews: Coco

on November 26, 2017 - 7:46am
By Cynthia Biddlecomb
Los Alamos

“Coco” is Disney Pixar’s latest, very colorful, animated film, full of love for family and the inspiration of music. The 3D version will be well worth your wait so that you see the full visual intent of the film. Marketed to the “PG” crowd, older folks may enjoy Coco for the beauty of the film and the values it holds dear. Parents, though, will want to know that the “thematic elements” to scare a child are animated skeletons.

Twelve year old Miguel (perfectly voiced by Anthony Gonzalez) wants to sing and play guitar more than anything in the world.

Tales Of Our Times: Truth Hides Out In Several Venues

on November 24, 2017 - 9:13am
Tales of Our Times
By JOHN BARTLIT
New Mexico Citizens
for Clean Air & Water

Truth Hides Out In Several Venues

We humans have a distinct flair for seeing the glass as half full or half empty. Experience shows a large category of people sees the half full portion. Neither can we miss the multitude that routinely pictures the empty half. The trickier impulse is to see something as half full one time and half empty the next time, depending on the focus at the time. This turn of mind is so richly human it is easily overlooked in the crowd.
 
Of its own free will, this quirk plays large parts in every

McQuiston: Three Reasons For Auto Rate Increases

on November 24, 2017 - 8:40am
By ALLEN MCQUISTON
The Jemez Agency
 
As 2017 draws to a close, let’s reflect on some insurance-related items in the industry.
 
While storms and hurricanes certainly dominated the headlines for a while, one issue that has been consistent throughout the year is an increase in auto insurance rates. If you’ve seen a rate increase this year and have wondered why (especially if you have a clean driving record), this column is for you.
 
Why are rates going up? There are three primary reasons:
 
  • 1. Distracted Driving: The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (nhtsa.gov) reports
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World Futures: Money, Trade, Value and Time Part 7

on November 23, 2017 - 10:15am

ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World
Futures Institute

Last week we explored the Federal Reserve System and how money is added to a country’s financial system through the granting of loans for doing or making something of value.

The money growth occurs because value is produced, or should be. As a result of effort expended, paid for with money, a product of value enters the market place and people consume it. In return, the consumers “earn” the product of value by producing something of value, be it a product or service.

Just One Thing To Do This Week: Tell Your Story

on November 23, 2017 - 10:11am

By MARY BETH MAASSEN
Los Alamos

The story goes that in the early spring of 1929 a dark-eyed infant was left on the doorstep of a humble home in rural Arkansas.

The owner of the home managed food and other provisions for the nearby prison and he was one of very few in the area who had a steady job and regular income. The baby girl became the youngest in a family of six girls and one boy. She would be adored and loved by her new brother and sisters. Rumors and speculation regarding her origins would occasionally surface, but even as an adult, she would never speak of it.

This is my mother’s

This Week At The Reel Deal

on November 23, 2017 - 10:10am

 

Garrison: 2017 Thanksgiving Thankful List

on November 23, 2017 - 9:08am
By TOM GARRISON
St. George, Utah

Each November I compose  a “Thanksgiving Thankful List” for the preceding year. My wife, Deb, and I enjoy our life in red rock southern Utah and have many things for which we are thankful. I hope sharing them brings a smile and acknowledgement that even the seldom thought of can be a source of thankfulness. Below is my 2017 list.

  1. I’m grateful for salad dressing. I’m an adult (sort of), I know veggies are good for me.

Inspirational people: Caring For A Dying Husband

on November 22, 2017 - 7:32am
By CAROL A. CLARK
Los Alamos Daily Post

Many people have died in this community in the years I have covered the news here. One death a couple of years ago stands out because I know quite well the man’s wife.

It was her behavior in the six months leading up to that death that took my breath away.

This woman’s serene reaction the day her husband’s brain cancer was diagnosed was the first indication that she would handle that tormenting road ahead with extraordinary grace.

Leading up to the diagnosis, she had expressed quiet concern with his personality changes and

Six Tips To Safely Frying A Turkey

on November 21, 2017 - 11:25am
By MICHELA DELLAMONICA
Smith Publicity, Inc.
 
A few years ago my daughter’s in-laws from Brooklyn, NY came to Memphis for Thanksgiving.
 
To give them a taste of Southern cuisine, I decided to fry a turkey in addition to my conventionally roasted turkey. In effect, we had a taste panel where our 20 guests got to try both a roasted and fried turkey. There was no question that the fried turkey tasted better. It was more savory and had a richer flavor. It gave new meaning to the saying: “anything fried tastes better."
 
Fried turkeys are great, but frying the turkey is seriously

How The Hen House Turns: No Horses In The Backyard

on November 21, 2017 - 7:56am
Former Los Alamos resident Cary Neeper's four granddaughters on a horse ranch in Colorado. Courtesy photo
 
By CARY NEEPER
 
The residents of the Hen House during our forty years in Los Alamos taught us tovrespect their personhood. And now, in the last decade or two, academic studies confirm the notion that animals do have emotions and cognizance.
 
Sadly, we were stuck too long in Rene Descartes' 17th century idea that "nonhuman animals cannot reason or feel but are...machines made out of meat.”
 
Charles Darwin disagreed, and now we have lots of evidence, not only from personal

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