Science

AGU: Area Burned By Severe Fire Increases 8-fold In Western U.S. Forests Over Last Four Decades

Howe Ridge Fire in Montana’s Glacier National Park, seen Aug. 12, 2018 from across Lake McDonald, roughly 24 hours after the fire was started by a lightning strike. Courtesy/Glacier National Park

AGU News:

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The number of wildfires and the amount of land they consume in the western U.S. has substantially increased since the 1980s, a trend often attributed to ongoing climate change.

Now, new research finds fires are not only becoming more common in the western U.S. but the area burned at high severity is also increasing, a trend that may lead to long-term forest loss.

The new findings


Tags:
Read More »

SHSU Professor Receives National Teacher-Scholar Award

Christopher Hobbs

SHSU News:

Christopher Hobbs, assistant professor of Chemistry at Sam Houston State University has been named a 2020 Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar.

One of only eight recognized from top institutions across the nation, the award honors young faculty in the chemical sciences who have created an outstanding independent body of scholarship and are deeply committed to education with undergraduates.

As a recognized scholar, Hobbs received a $75,000 research grant that will support his work in environmentally friendly chemistry.

“This grant will allow my research group


Tags:
Read More »

USDA Seeks Applications For ‘Rural Energy For America’

Courtesy/USDA

USDA News:

WASHINGTON, D.C. — United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Deputy Under Secretary for Rural Development Bette Brand invites applications for loan guarantees and grants for renewable energy systems; and to make energy efficiency improvements, conduct energy audits and provide development assistance.

The funding is being provided through USDA’s Rural Energy for America Program (REAP), which was created under the 2008 Farm Bill and reauthorized under the 2018 Farm Bill.

This notice seeks applications for Fiscal Year 2021 funding. The deadlines to apply


Tags:
Read More »

Stony Brook University: Rare Cretaceous-Age Fossil Discovery Opens New Chapter In Story Of Bird Evolution

Illustration depicting Falcatakely amidst nonavian dinosaurs and other creatures during the Late Cretaceous in Madagascar. Courtesy/Mark Witton

STONY BROOK News:

STONY BROOK, NY — A newly discovered, crow-sized bird fossil that would have sliced its way through the air wielding a large, blade-like beak, offers new insight into the evolution of face and beak shape in the Mesozoic forerunners of modern birds.

An international team of researchers led by Alan H. Turner, PhD, of Stony Brook University and Patrick O’Connor, PhD, of Ohio University, detail the findings in a paper published in


Tags:
Read More »

Air Force Research Laboratory Scholars Internship Program Accepting Applications Through Jan. 12, 2021

AFRL News:

KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE — The Air Force Research Laboratory’s Scholars program is now accepting applications for its 2021 summer session.

The program provides an opportunity for students ranging from high school to university graduate students interested in STEM careers, to work alongside top scientists and engineers. 

Educators in STEM fields also are accepted into the program, providing an opportunity for professional development.

Since 2001, thousands of students from across the country have taken part in these internships to do more than pad a resume. Through hands-on


Tags:
Read More »

NOAA Strategy Targets Stony Coral Tissue Loss Disease

A diseased brain coral in Looe Key, Fla. The disease is leaving a white band of recently dead skeleton in contrast to the healthy, yellow/brown tissue. Courtesy/Florida Fish and Wildlife Research Institute

NOAA News:

NOAA unveiled a new strategy Tuesday for the response to stony coral tissue loss disease, a disease that is spreading throughout the Atlantic and Caribbean region and may pose a threat to the Indo-Pacific region.  

The high-level strategy provides a framework and focus for ongoing efforts to slow the spread and to prevent and prepare for potential spread into the Indo-Pacific


Tags:
Read More »

Shift In Atmospheric Rivers May Affect Antarctic Sea Ice

Peterman Island, Graham Land, Antarctica. A new study finds that atmospheric rivers in the Southern Hemisphere have been gradually shifting toward the South Pole for the past 40 years, a trend which could lead to increased rates of ice melt in Antarctica. Courtesy/McKay Savage, CC-BY-2.0

AGU News:

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Weather systems responsible for transporting moisture from the tropics to temperate regions in the Southern Hemisphere have been gradually shifting toward the South Pole for the past 40 years, a trend which could lead to increased rates of ice melt in Antarctica, according to


Tags:
Read More »

Tracking COVID-19 In Los Alamos Community Wastewater

Prisca Tiasse, PhD in her lab Tuesday at Biodidact on DP Road. Photo by John McHale/ladailypost.com

By CAROL A. CLARK
Los Alamos Daily Post
caclark@ladailypost.com

Biodidact, a local R&D and environmental testing laboratory recently took part in an effort, with the collaboration of Los Alamos County wastewater treatment facility staff, to track COVID-19 in local community wastewater.

“We are fortunate to have researchers working toward capabilities for wastewater testing of COVID-19 in collaboration with the County,” Los Alamos County Council Chair Sara Scott said. “Continuing


Tags:
Read More »

Stratodynamics And University Of Kentucky To Conduct Test Flights At Spaceport America In New Mexico

The HiDRON at an altitude of 27km. Note the earth’s curvature is exaggerated by the use of a wide-angle lens. Courtesy/Stratodynamics

Spaceport America News:

Stratodynamics Inc. and research collaborators from the University of Kentucky will conduct a multi-flight campaign along with engineers from autopilot developer UAVOS starting early December at Spaceport America.

The two-week campaign is the culmination of an experimental NASA Flight Opportunities project to validate a new method of real time, forward sensing turbulence detection developed by the University and NASA Langley.


Tags:
Read More »

Coral Reef Health Assessed First Time On National Scale

A brain coral among staghorn corals in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Courtesy/Leslie Henderson, NOAA

NOAA News:

Coral reefs in both the Pacific and Atlantic oceans have received a “fair” score in the first-ever condition status report for U.S. coral reefs released by NOAA and the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES).

While the overall scores were “fair,” the report highlights coral reefs are vulnerable and declining. This is the first time coral reefs in all U.S. states and territories have been assessed using standardized monitoring data, creating datasets that


Tags:
Read More »

Amateur Naturalist: Tracking Through Snow

‘A’ points to a hoof mark and ‘B’ and ‘C’ point to grooves in opposite directions from hoof marks. Photo by Bob Walker

A male house finch all puffed up to keep warm. Photo by Bob Walker

By ROBERT DRYJA
Los Alamos

Snow has fallen quietly and straight down during the night. Trees have lines of snow along the upper sides of their branches in the morning. Pine trees have cups of snow in the clusters of their pine needles. The branches and needles absorb just enough heat from the sunlight to become warmer.

Snow melts. It falls to the ground throughout the morning, joining snow that already covers the ground.


Tags:
Read More »

LANL: Preserving Manhattan Project Historic Sites

Nov. 11, 2020 marks the five-year anniversary of Manhattan Project National Historical Park. As part of the park’s mission, preservation experts removed excess vegetation that contributed to the erosion of the Concrete Bowl, a site that shares a lesser-known story from the Manhattan Project. Courtesy/LANL

This historic photo depicts the Concrete Bowl with its wooden tower. During the Manhattan Project era, the tower’s tank held water and a small-scale bomb prototype with a “stand-in” for plutonium. Upon detonation, the bowl captured the water, allowing researchers to filter out and


Tags:
Read More »

Los Alamos National Laboratory And New Mexico State University Sign Agreement For Joint Appointments

NMSU Chancellor Dan Arvizu and Director Thom Mason and Deputy Director John Sarrao of Los Alamos National Laboratory championed the new agreement. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Staff-and-faculty exchange will build bottom-up collaborations and workforce pipeline

Los Alamos National Laboratory Director Thom Mason and Chancellor Dan Arvizu of New Mexico State University (NMSU) today announced the signing of a new institutional agreement to enable joint appointments. 

“The Laboratory is pleased to work with partners like NMSU to build scientific and engineering collaborations that mutually


Tags:
Read More »

U.S. Fish And Wildlife Service Announces Winner Of National Prize Challenge To Defeat Bat-Killing White-Nose Syndrome

A brown bat suffering with white-nose syndrome. Courtesy/USFWS

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service News: 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) announced today that a team of six researchers from Oregon State University and the University of California, Santa Cruz are the winners of a national prize challenge to combat white-nose syndrome (WNS), a lethal wildlife disease that has killed millions of bats in North America and pushed some native bat species to the brink of extinction.

The Service’s White-nose Syndrome Program launched the challenge in October 2019 as part of a multi-faceted


Tags:
Read More »

Los Alamos National Laboratory Works To Make Better, More Recyclable Plastics With New ‘BOTTLE’ Consortium

A new science consortium will tackle how to degrade and upcycle today’s waste plastics in a way that incentivizes their reclamation, and work toward wholly redesigning tomorrow’s plastics to be recyclable-by-design. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • New Department of Energy program builds on strengths of multiple laboratories

Los Alamos National Laboratory is partnering with four other national laboratories and four academic institutions in a new program to tackle the problem of plastic pollution. The partnership has been dubbed the BOTTLE Consortium for “Bio-Optimized Technologies to


Tags:
Read More »

SpaceX Invites Public To Ride Along On Historic First Operational Astronaut Launch For NASA Nov. 14

SpaceX Crew-1 astronauts, NASA’s Shannon Walker, Victor Glover and Michael Hopkins and JAXA astronaut Soichi Noguchi, pose in front of their Dragon capsule, ‘Resilience’, at SpaceX headquarters in Hawthorne, Calif. Courtesy/©SpaceX

By MIKE WALL
space.com

SpaceX’s first operational astronaut launch for NASA is just nine days away, and the agency is inviting the public to go along for the historic ride.

The Crew-1 mission is scheduled to lift off from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida on the evening of Nov. 14.

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will send a Crew Dragon capsule carrying


Tags:
Read More »

Newest AFRL Lab To Boost National Space Capabilities

Members of the AFRL Space Vehicles Directorate and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers celebrate the opening of the Deployable Structures Laboratory Oct. 29 at Kirtland Air Force Base. The laboratory was constructed by Sky Blue Builders and designed by Studio Southwest Architects, both of Albuquerque, and will be used for testing novel deployable space structures. Photo by Airman 1st Class Ireland Summers

AFRL Space Vehicles Directorate Director Col. Eric Felt, left, and Research Engineer Benjamin Urioste prepare to break the satellite piñata, following the ribbon cutting ceremony celebrating


Tags:
Read More »

NOAA Agreement With Google Explores Artificial Intelligence To Enhance Environmental Monitoring; Weather Prediction

Under a three-year Other Transaction Authority (OTA) agreement, NESDIS and Google will pilot specific AI- and ML-related projects to amplify NOAA’s environmental monitoring, weather forecasting, climate research, and technical innovation. Courtesy/NOAA

NOAA News:

NOAA’s Satellite and Information Service (NESDIS) has signed an agreement with Google to explore the benefits of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) for enhancing NOAA’s use of satellite and environmental data.

Under this three-year Other Transaction Authority (OTA) agreement, NESDIS and Google


Tags:
Read More »

AFRL Researchers Recognized As Early Career Leaders

2020 Air Force Research Laboratory Science & Engineering Early Career Award recipient Dr. Mark Spencer, who is a senior research physicist in AFRL’s Directed Energy Directorate at KAFB. Courtesy/KAFB

KAFB News:

KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE — Air Force Research Laboratory Commander, Brig. Gen. Heather Pringle, recently announced the 2020 AFRL Fellows and the newest class of AFRL Science and Engineering Early Career Award (S&E ECA) recipients.

She welcomed 11 researchers as AFRL Fellows and nine scientists and engineers for Early Career Awards. Two of the S&E ECA honorees work


Tags:
Read More »

Experts At biodiversity Conference Call For Linking Human And Livestock Health With Ecosystems

The Monteverde Cloud Forest in Costa Rica. Photo by Jodi Crisp

Global Landscapes Forum News:

  • Addressing the wild meat trade and restoring landscapes, key to preventing the next pandemic

BONN Germany — Dr. Peter Daszak, Sir Robert Watson, Elizabeth Mrema and more than 250 other experts at the Global Landscapes Forum Digital Biodiversity Conference ‘One World, One Health’ Oct. 28-29, called for integrating biodiversity and landscape perspectives into efforts to prevent future outbreaks of zoonoses – diseases of animal origin such as COVID-19, SARS, Ebola and HIV.

The event, joined by 5,000


Tags:
Read More »
CSTsiteisloaded