Raul Bujanda Named SAC Of Albuquerque FBI Division

FBI News:

FBI Director Christopher Wray has named Raul Bujanda as the special agent in charge (SAC) of the Albuquerque Field Office.

Bujanda most recently served as a section chief in the Criminal Investigative Division at FBI Headquarters in Washington.

He joined the FBI as a special agent in 2002 and was first appointed to the Portland Field Office in Oregon, where he investigated violent crime, gang, and Mexican-based drug trafficking organizations.

Bujanda transferred to the El Paso Field Office in Texas in 2008 to work on the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force strike force. He continued to investigate Mexican-based drug trafficking organizations.

In 2010, Bujanda was promoted to supervisory special agent of the El Paso strike force, which also included members from the Drug Enforcement Agency, Homeland Security Investigations, the U.S. Border Patrol, the El Paso Sheriff’s Office and other agencies.

Bujanda was promoted in 2013 to unit chief in the Criminal Justice Information Services Division in West Virginia. The Online Services and Operations Unit provided technical services, including real-time secure information sharing and crisis information, to the law enforcement community.

In 2015, he served as an assistant inspector and team leader in the Inspection Division at Headquarters. He was promoted in 2016 to assistant special agent in charge of the National Security Branch in the Oklahoma City Field Office. Bujanda later served as the assistant special agent in charge of Oklahoma City’s Criminal Branch, where he was responsible for criminal violations, administrative matters, and the FBI offices in the western region of the state.

Bujanda was named section chief of the Criminal Investigative Division’s National Covert Operations Section in 2019. He managed and oversaw all criminal and national security undercover operations for the FBI.

Prior to joining the FBI, Bujanda was a special agent in the Immigration and Naturalization Service and was a fifth-grade teacher.

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