Skip directly to content

Los Alamos Judge Pat Casados Elected Secretary-Treasurer Of New Mexico Magistrate Judges Association

on September 4, 2015 - 10:50am

Los Alamos County Magistrate Judge Pat A. Casados

COURT News:

ALBUQUERQUE – The Magistrate Judges Association elected new officers last week during the annual Magistrate Judges Conference in Albuquerque.

Newly elected officers include:

  • President – Santa Fe County Magistrate Court Judge George Anaya Jr.;
  • Vice president – Valencia County Magistrate Judge John R. Chavez; and
  • Secretary-Treasurer – Los Alamos County Magistrate Judge Pat A. Casados.

The Magistrate Judges Association was established in 1970 as a nonprofit organization and its activities include advocating for legislation and court funding. All sitting magistrate court judges and pro-tem judges are eligible for membership. There are 60 dues-paying member judges.

Judge Anaya succeeds Curry County Magistrate Judge Duane Castleberry as president. Judge Castleberry was the association’s president for two years. Judge Anaya has served on the magistrate court for 23 years. Judge Chavez has been in office two years and Judge Casados has served on the bench in Los Alamos for 13 years.

The association’s board members include:

  • Judges Matthew S. Page, Torrance County;
  • Warren G. Walton, Colfax County;
  • Karen P. Mitchell, Harding County;
  • Maurine Laney, Grant County;
  • Henry Castañeda, Eddy County;
  • Keith Clayton Rogers, Chaves County;
  • Joel Cano, Dona Ana County;
  • Buddy Hall, De Baca County;
  • Cynthia Sanders, McKinley County;
  • David Finger, Lea County;
  • Conrad F. Perea, Dona Ana County;
  • David Joel Garnett, Quay County;
  • D'Ann Read, Eddy County;
  • Duane Castleberry, Curry County;
  • John L. Sanchez, Mora County; and
  • L. Steve Jones of Moriarty; judge pro-tem member.

The state’s 67 magistrate court judges are subject to election every four years. Magistrate courts have limited jurisdiction and handle DWI cases, misdemeanors, traffic violations, civil actions up to $10,000 and hold preliminary hearings to determine probable cause on felony charges.


Advertisements