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Chaparral Prescribed Burn Begins Today

on January 24, 2013 - 7:08am

SANTA FE —The Santa Fe National Forest Cuba Ranger District expects to begin the 60-acre Chaparral prescribed burn today, Jan, 24 northwest of Fenton Lake and Seven Springs, 10 miles southeast of Cuba and nine miles northwest of Jemez Springs.

Smoke will be visible from Gillman, Jemez Pueblo, Jemez Springs, Cuba, Rio Rancho and Albuquerque.

Smoke from prescribed fire can be a nuisance to some people and a health concern for others, such as children, pregnant women, senior citizens, and those suffering from allergies, asthma, chemical sensitivities, or other heart or lung diseases.

To reduce exposure to smoke, stay indoors as much as possible with windows, doors and vents closed. Avoid or limit physical activities outdoors.

In the evenings, smoke settles into low lying areas, including drainages; however, lifts by mid-morning when the sun rises. Residents living in such low-lying areas may be most affected.

The public can obtain prescribed fire information by:

  • Calling the Santa Fe National Forest Public Affairs Office: 505-438-5320.
  • Calling the Santa Fe National Forest Fire Management Hotline: 1-877-971-FIRE
  • Following the Forest on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/SantafeNF
  • Being added to the Forest’s notification list. Receive daily updates on Santa Fe National Forest fire management activities by contacting the Public Affairs Officer Bruce Hill at 505-438-5320 or e-mail brucehill@fs.fed.us to be added to the notification list.

For a smoke forecast visit: http://inciweb.org/incident/3297/

For more information on how to minimize health impacts from smoke, contact the New Mexico Department of Health at 1-888-878-8992 or visit: http://nmhealth.org/eheb/airQ.shtml.

Prescribed burning is the managed application of fire to wild land fuels (woody material) under specified conditions, within predetermined boundaries in an effort to reduce hazardous fuels, provide community protection, and restore forest health.

Prior to the burn, fire managers consider many factors including: fuel moisture levels, wind conditions, temperatures, relative humidity levels, resources availability, and air quality conditions in determining whether to ignite or not. 

 


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