CDC Alert: Lettuce E. Coli Outbreak … Egg Recall For Salmonella Braenderup

Stop Foodborne Illness News:

Public health officials are telling consumers to avoid all types of romaine lettuce because of an E. coli outbreak linked to the vegetable that has spread to at least 16 states and sickened at least 60 people, including eight inmates at an Alaska prison.

What: US Center for Disease Control and Prevention Alert:

  • Lettuce E. coli Outbreak; and
  • Eggs Recall for Salmonella Braenderup.

Re: Lettuce E. coli Outbreak

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday that new information about the illnesses in Alaska led them to expand a warning beyond chopped romaine to include any type of romaine lettuce, including whole heads and hearts of romaine. The inmates who became sick at the Anvil Mountain Correctional Center in Nome ate lettuce from whole heads of romaine grown in Yuma, Ariz., the CDC said.

Re: Egg Salmonella Braenderup outbreak 

The CDC has solved the case of the current Salmonella outbreak linked to shell eggs. They’ve conclusively proved the outbreak strain originated at the Rose Acre Farms egg production facility in Hyde County, NC. It is one of 17 Rose Acre egg facilities in eight states. Rose Acre Farms egg production facility in Hyde County, NC. The Salmonella Braenderup outbreak that has caused at least 23 illnesses in nine states is bringing particular attention to Rose Acre Farms, the nation’s second-largest egg producer. The multistate outbreak has sent six people to hospitals. Food Safety News asked Rose Acre Farms if it wanted to comment on developments since it announced the recall, but, through a spokesman, the company decline the opportunity. Read more

About Stop Foodborne Illness

Stop Foodborne Illness is a national nonprofit, public health organization dedicated to preventing illness and death from foodborne pathogens by promoting sound food safety policy and best practices, building public awareness, and assisting those impacted by foodborne illness. For more food safety tips, visit www.Stopfoodborneillness.org/awareness/. If you think you have been sickened from food, contact your local health professional.

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