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Classical Music World: Notes From Cliburn 3

on June 3, 2017 - 7:20am

A native of the San Francisco Bay area, Daniel Hsu, one of the youngest competitors at age 19, studies at the Curtis Institute. Courtesy photo 
 

South Korean competitor Dasol Kim, 28, studies at the Hochshule fur Musik in Hanover, Germany. Courtesy photo 
 

By Ann McLaughlin
Artistic Director
Los Alamos Concert Association

The penultimate round of the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition is finally under way. Twelve semi-finalists will each play a 60-minute recital and a Mozart concerto with the Fort Worth Symphony.

Last night 19-year-old Daniel Hsu, one of the two Americans still

Los Alamos Residents Dorota Listwan And Son Mark Become American Citizens Today

on June 2, 2017 - 4:14pm

Los Alamos residents Dorota Listwan of Poland and her son Mark Listwan with their Certificates of Naturalization. The mother and son became United States citizens this morning at a ceremony in Albuquerque. Dorota and her husband Pawel Listwan own Cottonwood on the Greens Restaurant at the Los Alamos Golf Course. Pawel became an American citizen in 2016. Courtesy photo

Rover Findings Indicate Stratified Lake On Ancient Mars

on June 2, 2017 - 10:31am

Sedimentary Signs of a Martian Lakebed (Shallow Part): This evenly layered rock imaged in 2014 by the Mastcam on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover shows a pattern typical of a lake-floor sedimentary deposit near where flowing water entered a lake. Shallow and deep parts of an ancient Martian lake left different clues in mudstone formed from lakebed deposits. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Water carried more oxygen at certain times, depths

A long-lasting lake on ancient Mars provided stable environmental conditions that differed significantly from one part of the lake to another, according to a

Classical Music World: Notes From Cliburn 2

on June 2, 2017 - 6:34am

Los Alamos Concert Association Artistic Director Ann McLaughlin reports on the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition in Fort Worth. Courtesy Photo
By Ann McLaughlin
Artistic Director
Los Alamos Concert Association
 

Downtown Fort Worth is all gussied up for the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition. Banners line the streets. The Cliburn logo is everywhere. Even the crosswalks in front of the Bass Concert Hall are painted to look like keyboards. For a city that is famous for its stockyards, these Texans sure take their music seriously!

We arrived here Thursday morning on an easy

History On Tap: The Soviet Side Of The Cold War Tonight!

on June 1, 2017 - 8:44am

Los Alamos History Museum News:

Join the Los Alamos History Museum for History on Tap, for an engaging discussion about the Soviet side of the Cold War with Samantha Lippard. History on Tap, part of the On Tap series presented by the Los Alamos Creative District, is 5:30 p.m. today at UnQuarked, 145 Central Park Square.

How did the other side live during the Cold War? This edition of History on Tap will explore the Soviet side of the Cold War, from Levi’s blue jeans and the British Invasion to cosmonauts and Soviet television.

Classical Music World: Notes From Cliburn 1

on June 1, 2017 - 8:40am

Van Cliburn in 1959, the only classical musician to be honored with a ticker tape parade in New York. Courtesy photo

By Ann McLaughlin
Artistic Director
Los Alamos Concert Association

It happens every four years. Competitors vie for medals as fans cheer. Paparazzi swarm about. It isn’t the Olympics. It’s the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition! The competition is underway right now and I will be reporting to you from Fort Worth every day.

The story of the competition’s birth is legendary and begins in Moscow.  

In 1958, at the height of the cold war, the Soviet Union wanted to

Los Alamos Native Offers Aid, Assistance To Refugees

on June 1, 2017 - 7:15am

Los Alamos Native Ariana Rowberry volunteers at two refugee camps in Greece. Courtesy Photo

 

By KIRSTEN LASKEY 

Los Alamos Daily Post 

 

Ariana Rowberry, a Los Alamos native, was working in the Middle East Directorate in Washington, D.C., when she decided to take some time off before going to law school this fall. Motivated to gain firsthand exposure to some of the policy issues that her directorate worked on, she decided to volunteer at refugee camps in Greece.

Rowberry spent February through April volunteering at two camps: Ritsona, a camp north of Athens primarily comprised of

Griggs: Dateline Oaxaca ... A More Leisurely Visit

on June 1, 2017 - 7:11am
Two rappers gesticulating and insulting each other to music in El Llano Park. After a particularly good zinger, the crowd would laugh and applaud. After each round, the crowd would vote for their favorite rapper. Photo by David Griggs

A roaring lion at the entrance to Parque Juarez (El Llano) in Oaxaca, Mexico. Photo by David Griggs

 

By DAVID GRIGGS
Foreign Correspondent
Los Alamos Daily Post

Three days in Oaxaca was not enough, so this year I stretched my visit to two weeks. Hostel Don Nino at 804 Pino Suarez was once again my base of operations.

Study Shows Humans Have Polluted European Air For 2000 Years

on May 31, 2017 - 10:22am

The Colle Gnifetti Glacier on the Swiss-Italian border where the ice core used in the study was taken. In the bottom right corner, the coring stie can be seen. Photo by Nicole Spaulding

AGU News:

WASHINGTON, DC — A new study combining European ice core data and historical records of the infamous Black Death pandemic of 1349-1353 shows metal mining and smelting have polluted the environment for thousands of years, challenging the widespread belief that environmental pollution began with the Industrial Revolution in the 1700s and 1800s.

The new study, accepted for publication in GeoHealth, a

World Wedding Traditions To Bring Good Fortune

on May 31, 2017 - 7:56am

Courtesy image

COMMUNITY News:

Everyone loves a wedding. Spirits are high, drinks are flowing, the best man is shaving the groom, the mother-in-law is throwing ducks at the bride …

Weddings are different for every culture around the world and a new infographic from 888Poker reveals a collection of the most interesting and colourful – though it’s certainly optional whether to include them in one's own special day.

A Different Type of Wedding Bell

Some of the rituals might be more familiar – like throwing the bouquet or breaking a glass – but others won’t be.

LANL: ‘Halos’ Discovered On Mars Widen Time Frame For Potential Life

on May 30, 2017 - 7:04pm

A mosaic of images from the navigation cameras on the NASA Curiosity rover shows ‘halos’ of lighter-toned bedrock around fractures. These halos comprise high concentrations of silica and indicate that liquid groundwater flowed through the rocks in Gale crater longer than previously believed. Courtesy/NASA/JPL-Caltech

LANL News:

Lighter-toned bedrock that surrounds fractures and comprises high concentrations of silica—called “halos”—has been found in Gale crater on Mars, indicating that the planet had liquid water much longer than previously believed.

Los Alamos Freshman Lillian Petersen Wins Third Place At Intel International Science And Engineering Fair

on May 28, 2017 - 6:41am

Lillian Petersen places third in the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair May 14-19  in Los Angeles. Courtesy photo

LAPS News:

Los Alamos Topper Academy freshman Lillian Petersen competed May 14-19 in the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) in Los Angeles, Calif. Petersen received a third place award for her project in the Earth and Environmental Sciences category. The title of Petersen’s award winning project is, America's Farming Future: The Impact of Climate Change on Crop Yields. Petersen was awarded a $1,000 scholarship by Intel.

Also competing at the

Holy Fire From Jerusalem Arrives In Los Alamos

on May 28, 2017 - 6:17am
Father Silouan at the Monastery of the Holy Archangel Michael, left, receives the Holy Fire May 17 from Father Theophan Mackey of St. Job of Pochaiv Christian Orthodox Church in Los Alamos. Courtesy photo
 
The Holy Fire from Jerusalem was transported from Alamosa, Colo., to Los Alamos in camping lamps set in buckets of sand by Father Theophan Mackey and Emrys Tennessen. Courtesy photo
 
The Holy Fire candle sits in front of the tabernacle at St. Job of Pochaiv Christian Orthodox Church in Los Alamos. Courtesy photo
 
By MAIRE O'NEILL
Los Alamos Daily Post

St.

Whole New Jupiter: First Science Results From NASA’s Juno Mission Show Gigantic Turbulent World

on May 27, 2017 - 7:41am
Through the Juno mission, scientists are learning more about the largest planet in the solar system. NASA/JPL-CalTech/USGS Photo
 
NASA News: 
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Early science results from NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter portray the largest planet in the solar system as a complex, gigantic, turbulent world, with Earth-sized polar cyclones, plunging storm systems that travel deep into the heart of the gas giant, and a mammoth, lumpy magnetic field that may indicate it was generated closer to the planet’s surface than previously thought.
 
“We are excited to share these early

Aspen School Celebrates Books, Libraries & Africa

on May 26, 2017 - 5:07am
Aspen students show off some of the books they have collected for The African Library Project. Courtesy photo
 
Chris Bradshaw, founder of The African Library Project, visited Aspen School Tuesday. Kindergarten students presented her with a special handmade hat. Courtesy photo

EDUCATION News:

Tuesday, Aspen students were treated to an assembly celebrating books, libraries and Africa. Chris Bradshaw, founder of The African Library Project, spoke to all 450 students and staff at the school about her experiences making libraries in African countries.

Her presentation highlighted the

World Futures: SOCIETY – Commercial and Financial – How Do We Do Business, Individually and Collectively?

on May 25, 2017 - 4:02pm

World Futures: What Do We Need?

By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute


In the history of humanity individuals banded together to form micro societies in which the members worked collectively for the common good.  

Everything was pooled primarily for survival. Then micro societies interacted using barter to exchange essentials (satisfy needs). As humanity evolved, however, certain things became collectively recognized as having inherent value, permitting different micro societies to essentially export their “stuff” in exchange for inherent value.  

Then, as the micro societies

African Library Project Founder To Address Aspen Students And Community Members Monday Morning

on May 21, 2017 - 6:58am

African Library Project Founder Chris Bradshaw

EDUCATION News:

African Library Project Founder Chris Bradshaw is conducting a presentation Monday morning for all Aspen Elementary School students.

Her presentation is 9:15-10 a.m. in the school gymnasium.

Community members interested in hearing her inspirational talk about making a difference in the world by sending 1,000-book libraries to schools all over Africa are welcome to attend.

The Los Alamos community has supported the project over the past year by donating enough books (more than 11,000) and funds ($5,500) to create 11 libraries

Griggs: Dateline – 2017 New Orleans Jazz Fest

on May 20, 2017 - 8:39am
The ‘Cream of the Crop’ features three little girls singing the chorus on songs for J. Monque’D and his band in the Blues tent. Photo by David Griggs
 
Amedee Frederick VI, 5, plays guitar next to his father, Amedee V at the 2017 Jazz Fest in New Orleans. This is another strong Louisiana musical family. His sister Victoria is the girl on the left in ‘Cream of the Crop’, and their grandfather, Amedee IV, was in the audience. Photo by David Griggs
 
By DAVID GRIGGS
Foreign Correspondent
Los Alamos Daily Post
 
An estimated 425,000 fans packed the fairgrounds for another memorable Jazz Fest

Today Is International Endangered Species Day

on May 19, 2017 - 11:13am

ESC News:

Washington, DC – Thousands of Americans are gathering to participate in Endangered Species Day events across the country, in recognition of our nation’s commitment to protect and restore disappearing wildlife.

 

This is the 12th annual international Endangered Species Day, which occurs on the third Friday of May, celebrating our wildlife and wild places.

 

“Endangered Species Day celebrates our declared national responsibility to our children and their children to save our vanishing wildlife and plants,” stated Leda Huta, executive director of the Endangered Species Coalition

World Futures: SOCIETY ... Tools – Simplified – To Help The Human Existence And Reduce Production Overhead

on May 19, 2017 - 5:34am

World Futures: What Do We Need?

By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute


The plow was invented around 3,500 B.C.E.  (3,500 B.C.) in Mesopotamia and China. Around 1,900 B.C.E., forged iron plowshares were being used. In 1785, the cast iron plowshare was invented and it was mass produced for the first time in 1839 by John Deere.  

Other machinery was invented to assist in seeding, threshing, and reaping all pulled by horses. Evolutionary devices mechanized these devices with the addition of engines to power them.

This description illustrates the development of tools to perform tasks

NNSA Hosts Bilateral Workshop On Radiation Measurement With Japan At Lawrence LLNL

on May 18, 2017 - 9:24am
NNSA News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C.  The Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) hosted a bilateral workshop with Japan May 2-5 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, Calif.
 
The workshop, which focused on radiation measurement, characterization, and protective actions for emergency preparedness and response, was the ninth meeting of the Emergency Management Working Group under the U.S.-Japan Bilateral Commission on Civil Nuclear Cooperation.
 
Jay Tilden, NNSA’s associate administrator for counterterrorism and counterproliferation,

Ice Particles In Earth’s Atmosphere Create Glints

on May 18, 2017 - 8:46am
One million miles from Earth, a NASA camera is capturing unexpected flashes of light reflecting off Earth. Courtesy/NASA
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — One million miles from Earth, a NASA camera is capturing unexpected flashes of light reflecting off Earth.
 
The homeward-facing instrument on NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory, or DSCOVR, launched in 2015, caught hundreds of these flashes over the span of a year. NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) instrument aboard DSCOVR is taking almost-hourly images of the sunlit planet from its spot between Earth and the sun.

Nuclear Security Training Center Opens In Kazakhstan

on May 17, 2017 - 9:33am
NNSA News:
 
The Republic of Kazakhstan, in cooperation with the United States Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), opened its Nuclear Security Training Center (NSTC) May 12 in Alatau, Kazakhstan.
 
The training center allows Kazakhstan to train personnel from local, regional, and international nuclear facilities and organizations. It will focus on fundamental and advanced nuclear security topics and provide a venue for discussing best practices.
 
“This training center demonstrates the Republic of Kazakhstan’s commitment to nuclear security.

Experts Expect Surge In Ransomware Attacks ... This Time Without ‘Kill Switch’

on May 15, 2017 - 8:56am

WannaCry image. Courtesy/systweak

HSNW News:

A second version of the disruptive WannaCry ransomware – a version which does not contain the “kill switch” used by a young security analyst to shut down many of last week’s cyberattacks – is set to be released by the same group of hackers.

Costin Raiu, of cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Lab, told Hacker News that his firm had already seen versions of the malware, which did not contain the website domain name used to shut down the program.

He later backtracked, saying this was not actually the case. 

Hacker News quotes other experts who warned it

World Futures: Data / Information / Knowledge

on May 12, 2017 - 7:15am

By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute

For a 30 day period, every day at precisely 10 a.m. (or 10:00 or 1000 hrs.) Greenwich Mean Time, you record the temperature on the same thermometer at precisely the same location in both degrees Celsius and degrees Fahrenheit. You now have 30 data points.

On a piece of graph paper you label the bottom, horizontal axis from zero to 31. On the left side at the zero point you create a vertical Celsius scale and on the right side (at the 31 point) you create a Fahrenheit scale precisely synchronized to the Celsius scale. Then you plot the data.

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