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U.S. Sen. Tom Udall Holds Listening Session On Human Trafficking In New Mexico's Indian Country

on July 27, 2017 - 8:57am

From the Office of U.S. Sen. Tom Udall:

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Today, U.S. Sen. Tom Udall, vice chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, held a stakeholder meeting on ways to more effectively prevent, prosecute, and improve data collection on human trafficking in Indian Country.

Federal data on human trafficking in Native communities is limited, but available information suggests human trafficking in the United States frequently targets vulnerable populations, which would include Native Americans who disproportionately face high rates of poverty and trauma.

In order to address the

Sen. Heinrich Statement On Russia Sanctions

on July 26, 2017 - 10:00am

U.S. SENATE News:

WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.), a member of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence and the Senate Armed Services Committee, released the following statement after the House of Representatives voted 419-3 to approve legislation, which has been long opposed by the Trump administration, sanctioning Russia, Iran and North Korea:

“Expanding sanctions against Russia sends a strong message that there will be real consequences for undermining our democratic process.

LANL Information Scientist Herbert Van de Sompel To Receive Paul Evan Peters Award

on July 26, 2017 - 9:51am

Herbert Van De Sompel, an information scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, will recieve the Paul Evan Peters Award.

LANL News:

  • Networked infrastructure to support scholarship among his contributions

Herbert Van de Sompel, research scientist at the Research Library of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, has been named the 2017 recipient of the Paul Evan Peters Award from the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI), the Association of Research Libraries, and EDUCAUSE.

The award recognizes notable, lasting achievements in the creation and innovative use of network-based information

County Presents Proclamation Of Friendship To Hiroshima, Nagasaki

on July 25, 2017 - 7:17am

From left, Los Alamos Historical Society Board Member Michael Redondo, County Council Chair David Izraelevitz and Los Alamos History Museum Director Judith Stauber show off the proclamation and paper cranes that will be delivered to the Nagasaki and Hiroshima in August. Izraelevitz presented the proclamation Monday at Fuller Lodge. Photo by Kirsten Laskey/ladailypost.com

Staff Report

Los Alamos Historical Society board member Michael Redondo and Los Alamos History Museum Director Judith Stauber will present a Los Alamos County proclamation of frienship to the Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum and

NOAA’s Climate.Gov: Natural Wetlands, Tropical Agriculture Cause Methane Increases, Not Oil And Gas

on July 24, 2017 - 7:59am
Courtesy/NOAA
 
NOAA News:
 
“Agricultural and wetland emissions” from the planet’s tropical areas, not oil and gas activities in the United States, are more than likely responsible for a post-2007 global increase in methane levels, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate.gov.
 
But regulating or mitigating those methane sources could be difficult or impossible.
 
“Both of the likely contenders for the recent increase in emissions could be tricky to mitigate,” wrote Climate.gov’s Rebecca Lindsey and Michon Scott.

NNSA Spearheads International Effort To Convert Ghana Reactor To Low Enriched Uranium Fuel

on July 23, 2017 - 7:51am
NNSA in Washington, D.C. Courtesy/NNSA
 
NNSA News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C.  A team of experts from the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration, the International Atomic Energy Agency, China and Ghana completed the conversion of Ghana’s GHARR-1 Miniature Neutron Source Reactor from highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium fuel July 13.
 
These reactor conversions allow important research to continue while enabling the removal and disposal of HEU fuel, eliminating the risk that this weapons-usable material could be stolen or diverted for malevolent use. 

World Futures: Who Do You Trust – Or Is It Whom? Part Three

on July 21, 2017 - 8:40am
By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute
 
In the previous two columns we explored how we make collective decisions for saving earth and humanity. These decisions encompassed both the what and the how, with how being the creative or most difficult part. We looked at the Special Theory of Relativity, cold fusion, reporting on a survey, the U.S. Constitution, the Communist Manifesto, and the Paris Agreement. Now it is appropriate to explore implications for parts of the List of 18.
 
Energy: How do we make alternative energy affordable?

LANL: Neutrino Research Takes Giant Leap Forward

on July 20, 2017 - 4:31pm

This illustration shows the 800-mile/1300-kilometer path from Fermilab to the Sanford Underground Research Facility, straight through the earth. Courtesy/Fermilab
  • The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment will send particles 800 miles to a mile-deep detector in South Dakota

LANL News:

In a unique groundbreaking ceremony July 21 at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, S.D., an international group of dignitaries, scientists and engineers will mark the start of construction of a massive experiment that could change our understanding of the universe.

Savannah River Site Reaches Milestone In Supplying Tritium For National Defense

on July 20, 2017 - 4:20pm

SAVANNAH RIVER News:

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The National Nuclear Security Administration’s Savannah River Tritium Enterprise (SRTE) in Aiken, S.C., has conducted three tritium extractions in fiscal year 2017, marking the first time the Tritium Extraction Facility has performed more than one extraction in a year.

 “Achieving this significant milestone – especially doing it safely, securely, and in a disciplined manner – has required a tremendous team effort on the part of the entire SRTE team,” said Lt. Gen. Frank G.

Heinrich: Russia Treating West Like It’s The Wild, Wild West With No Norms, No Laws, No Consequences...

on July 20, 2017 - 8:09am
U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich
 
U.S. SENATE News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.) questioned four-star General Paul Selva during a Tuesday Senate Armed Service Committee hearing for his reappointment to U.S. Air Force General and Vice Chair of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
 
Sen. Heinrich asked General Selva about Russia’s hostile actions toward the United States and its allies in Europe. “I think the pattern of behavior from Russia is painfully obvious. They will do what it takes to achieve their objectives with very little limitations.

ORNL: Titan Simulations Show Importance Of Close 2-Way Coupling Between Human And Earth Systems

on July 20, 2017 - 7:48am
OLCF’s Titan advances delivery of accelerated, high-resolution earth system model with human dimensions. Courtesy photo
 
ORNL News:
 
Oak Ridge National Laboratory announces that its Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) has developed a new integrated computational climate model to reduce uncertainties in future climate predictions marks the first successful attempt to bridge Earth systems with energy and economic models and large-scale human impact data.
 
The integrated Earth System Model, or iESM, is being used to explore interactions between the physical climate system,

AIA Presents ‘US-Russian Relations: Is the Past Always Prologue?’ With Ambassador C. Paul Robinson

on July 20, 2017 - 6:56am

Albuquerque International Association News:

As part of its 2017 International Lecture Series, the Albuquerque International Association presents “US-Russian Relations: Is the Past Always Prologue?” with Ambassador C. Paul Robinson.

The lecture is open to the public, 3-5 p.m. Friday, July 28 at the UNM Continuing Education Conference Center, 1634 University Blvd. NE in Albuquerque.

After 1991, following the break-up of the USSR, the Russian Federation began to slip into the rear-view mirror of American foreign policy.

Audio Exclusive: Alex Kirk Signs With Professional Team In Japan

on July 19, 2017 - 3:43pm
Former Los Alamos High School Hilltopper and University of New Mexico Lobo Alex Kirk will continue his professional playing in Tokyo, Japan this fall. Courtesy/Alex Kirk
 
By RJ Montaño, Sports Editor
Los Alamos Daily Post
rjmontano@ladailypost.com
 
 

Playing basketball and visiting different countries for a living is a dream come true for White Rock native Alex Kirk. The former Los Alamos High School Hilltopper and University of New Mexico Lobo will continue his professional playing career with Toyota Alvark Tokyo in Japan this fall.

LANL: Simulation Reveals Universal Signature Of Chaos In Ultracold Reactions

on July 19, 2017 - 8:26am

A two-dimensional slice of the potential energy surface for the K + KRb reaction. The reaction proceeds from right to left. In the intermediate region a deep well is clearly visible which leads to chaotic motion. Image courtesy Los Alamos National Laboratory. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Findings have implications for quantum computing, other technologies

Researchers have performed the first ever quantum-mechanical simulation of the benchmark ultracold chemical reaction between potassium-rubidium (KRb) and a potassium atom, opening the door to new controlled chemistry experiments and quantum

Udall, Heinrich Fight To Protect Immigrant Survivors Of Domestic Violence, Demand Victims Not Be Targeted

on July 19, 2017 - 7:43am

U.S. SENATE News:

WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Senators Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich sent a letter to U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary John Kelly expressing their serious and growing concern that DHS personnel have taken steps to erode longstanding protections for immigrant survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, human trafficking and other crimes, undermining the bipartisan Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), the Trafficking Victim Protection Act (TVPA), and other state and federal laws enacted to protect survivors.

“Survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault and

Cyberattack Could Cost $120 Billion: Lloyd’s Of London

on July 18, 2017 - 9:34am

HSNW News:

Insurance giant Lloyd’s of London has warned that the cost of a serious cyberattack to the global economy could reach $120 billion or more – which was the cost of damage inflicted by Hurricanes Katrina or Sandy.

The 56-page report from the world’s oldest insurance firm says the threat posed by global cyberattacks has spiraled, and that it poses a huge risk over the next decade to business and governments everywhere.

The report says that the most likely cyberattack scenario is a hack which manages to shut down a cloud service provider.

National Awards Recognize Los Alamos National Laboratory Leadership In Nuclear Safeguards

on July 17, 2017 - 5:37pm

Nancy Jo Nicholas, Los Alamos National Laboratory’s associate director for threat identification and response, was recognized with the Edway R. Johnson Meritorious Service award by the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

Two Los Alamos National Laboratory employees were recognized today by the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management for their contributions to the nuclear safeguards profession.

Nancy Jo Nicholas, the Laboratory’s associate director for threat identification and response, was recognized with the Edway R. Johnson Meritorious Service award.

Letter To The Editor: Selling Rope On Credit To Hang Capitalism

on July 16, 2017 - 8:57am
By PETR JANDACEK
Los Alamos

Lenin said: “When the time is right we will make great concessions and overtures of peace to the capitalists and they will sell us the rope with which we will hang them.”

Capitalists are bidding to sell Putin the rope on credit.

Go Hillary! Go Donald!

CIR Panel On Human Migration And The Border July 26

on July 16, 2017 - 8:56am
CIR News:
 
Join the Santa Fe Council on International Relations at 6 p.m., Wednesday, July 26 at the Drury Plaza Hotel, 828 Paseo de Peralta, for a panel of three experts who will discusses human migration and the border.
 
Featured Panelists:
 
Allegra Love
 
Allegra Love is the attorney and director of SF Dreamers. She began her career at Santa Fe Public Schools in 2005 as a bilingual elementary school teacher and followed her passion for working with immigrants to law school.
 
After graduating from the University of New Mexico School of Law, she came to work for the Adelante

DREAM BIG: Free Screening Reel Deal 10am Saturday

on July 14, 2017 - 10:44am

BECHTEL News:

What does it mean to be an engineer? Bechtel Corporation, one of the lead teammates of Los Alamos National Security LLC, is joining with Los Alamos National Laboratory and Los Alamos ScienceFest to present a free, one-day-only showing of an inspirational movie about engineering called “Dream Big: Engineering Our World.”

The movie is showing at IMAX theaters and science museums across the country but we’ve arranged for a screening in Los Alamos as part of the ScienceFest celebration.

Dream Big takes viewers on a journey of discovery from the world’s tallest building to a

Nobel Peace Laureate Liu Xiaobo Has Died

on July 14, 2017 - 9:24am
Chinese writer Liu Xiaobo, a 2010 Nobel peace laureate and 2004 RSF press freedom laureate, died Wednesday ... he had been imprisoned in China since 2008. Courtesy photo
 
RSF News:
 
Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is deeply saddened by the news of the death of Chinese writer Liu Xiaobo, who was the 2010 Nobel peace laureate and 2004 RSF press freedom laureate. RSF holds the Chinese authorities responsible and urges them to end the house arrest of his wife, Liu Xia.

The embodiment of resistance to oppression and the fight for

World Futures: Who Do You Trust – Or Is It Whom? Part Two

on July 14, 2017 - 4:39am

World Futures:  What Do We Need?

By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute

In part one of this series, three documents were listed for suggested for reading. In your busy schedule, did you have the time? Let’s consider the challenge.

There is a card in circulation titled “100 Days of Summer Get Out. Get Active” One of the check boxes is “Read 100 Books.” What does this really mean?  According to www.reading soft.com, the average person reads 200 words per minute with 65 percent comprehension. Checking Wikipedia, novels range from 100,000 to 175,000 words.

Korean War Veteran Paul Elkins Shares Story, Part 2

on July 13, 2017 - 6:21am

Korean War veteran Paul Elkins of Los Alamos on Hill 324 in Korea in 1952. Courtesy photo

Outpost Yoke was the first place Paul Elkins served in Korea in January 1952. Courtesy photo

 

By MAIRE O'NEILL
Los Alamos Daily Post

When we left MSgt. Paul Elkins in Korea in Part One of this series, his regiment had arrived and he had led two squads to the Company outpost, which was about three-quarters of a mile ahead of the front line and Chinese troops were manning the line they were facing. By this time, it had started to snow and the conditions were miserable.

Day Of Action For Net Neutrality Breaks Records

on July 12, 2017 - 6:52pm

INTERNET News:

There has been such a surge in activity -- and the traffic is not showing signs of slowing down -- that organizers are still scrambling to document everything that has happened but so far through the BattleForTheNet.com site alone (not including the Internet Association’s page or other aligned efforts) we’ve seen:

 NOTE: these numbers represent only a portion of the final totals, and due to the massive numbers, comments and emails will be delivered over several days.  We will release additional updates as we continue documenting what has happened:

  • More than 10 million

Letter To The Editor: Mosul, A Pyrrhic Victory

on July 12, 2017 - 12:03pm
By DOUGLAS REILLY
Los Alamos
 
Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi visited Mosul Sunday “to announce its liberation and congratulate the armed forces and Iraqi people on this victory.”
 
(New York Times, Sunday July 9, 2017 from al-Abadi's official Twitter account). From the same NYT article, “The victory marked the formal end of a bloody campaign that lasted nearly nine months, left much of Iraq's second- largest city in ruins, killed thousands of people, and displaced nearly a million more.”
 
The pictures we've seen in news media remind me of Dresden after the allied fire-bombing

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