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World Futures: SOCIETY ... Tools – Simplified – To Help The Human Existence And Reduce Production Overhead

on May 19, 2017 - 5:34am

World Futures: What Do We Need?

By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute


The plow was invented around 3,500 B.C.E.  (3,500 B.C.) in Mesopotamia and China. Around 1,900 B.C.E., forged iron plowshares were being used. In 1785, the cast iron plowshare was invented and it was mass produced for the first time in 1839 by John Deere.  

Other machinery was invented to assist in seeding, threshing, and reaping all pulled by horses. Evolutionary devices mechanized these devices with the addition of engines to power them.

This description illustrates the development of tools to perform tasks

NNSA Hosts Bilateral Workshop On Radiation Measurement With Japan At Lawrence LLNL

on May 18, 2017 - 9:24am
NNSA News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C.  The Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) hosted a bilateral workshop with Japan May 2-5 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, Calif.
 
The workshop, which focused on radiation measurement, characterization, and protective actions for emergency preparedness and response, was the ninth meeting of the Emergency Management Working Group under the U.S.-Japan Bilateral Commission on Civil Nuclear Cooperation.
 
Jay Tilden, NNSA’s associate administrator for counterterrorism and counterproliferation,

Ice Particles In Earth’s Atmosphere Create Glints

on May 18, 2017 - 8:46am
One million miles from Earth, a NASA camera is capturing unexpected flashes of light reflecting off Earth. Courtesy/NASA
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — One million miles from Earth, a NASA camera is capturing unexpected flashes of light reflecting off Earth.
 
The homeward-facing instrument on NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory, or DSCOVR, launched in 2015, caught hundreds of these flashes over the span of a year. NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) instrument aboard DSCOVR is taking almost-hourly images of the sunlit planet from its spot between Earth and the sun.

Nuclear Security Training Center Opens In Kazakhstan

on May 17, 2017 - 9:33am
NNSA News:
 
The Republic of Kazakhstan, in cooperation with the United States Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), opened its Nuclear Security Training Center (NSTC) May 12 in Alatau, Kazakhstan.
 
The training center allows Kazakhstan to train personnel from local, regional, and international nuclear facilities and organizations. It will focus on fundamental and advanced nuclear security topics and provide a venue for discussing best practices.
 
“This training center demonstrates the Republic of Kazakhstan’s commitment to nuclear security.

Experts Expect Surge In Ransomware Attacks ... This Time Without ‘Kill Switch’

on May 15, 2017 - 8:56am

WannaCry image. Courtesy/systweak

HSNW News:

A second version of the disruptive WannaCry ransomware – a version which does not contain the “kill switch” used by a young security analyst to shut down many of last week’s cyberattacks – is set to be released by the same group of hackers.

Costin Raiu, of cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Lab, told Hacker News that his firm had already seen versions of the malware, which did not contain the website domain name used to shut down the program.

He later backtracked, saying this was not actually the case. 

Hacker News quotes other experts who warned it

World Futures: Data / Information / Knowledge

on May 12, 2017 - 7:15am

By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute

For a 30 day period, every day at precisely 10 a.m. (or 10:00 or 1000 hrs.) Greenwich Mean Time, you record the temperature on the same thermometer at precisely the same location in both degrees Celsius and degrees Fahrenheit. You now have 30 data points.

On a piece of graph paper you label the bottom, horizontal axis from zero to 31. On the left side at the zero point you create a vertical Celsius scale and on the right side (at the 31 point) you create a Fahrenheit scale precisely synchronized to the Celsius scale. Then you plot the data.

Nature Center Talk: Unusual Wildlife Of Madagascar

on May 10, 2017 - 8:32am

This leaping lemur, diademed sifaka, is endemic to specific regions of eastern Madagascar. Photo by Martin Cooper

PEEC News:

Local photographer Martin Cooper will share photos from his three-week visit to Madagascar, which covered four ecosystems and gave him the chance to capture images of wildlife including lemurs, chameleons, and endemic birds that are unique to the island. This free talk, organized by Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC), is 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 16 at the Los Alamos Nature Center, 2600 Canyon Road.

Madagascar has been biologically isolated from Africa and

Huerta Family Issues Heart-Felt Thank You

on May 10, 2017 - 7:21am

LANL: Data Analysis Could Trigger New Shale Gas Revolution

on May 8, 2017 - 7:53pm

Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Manipulating ‘tail production’ could yield huge long-term gains while minimizing environmental impacts

Extensive data mining and analysis of 20,000 shale gas wells has revealed how “refracturing” existing wells with new technology could transform them from diminished producers into high-performers long after their initial peak production period has ended.

“Our analysis could potentially aid in reducing the number of new wells to be drilled,” said Richard Middleton, lead author of the study by a team of Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists.

Magdala Stone Goes On Exhibit In Rome May 15

on May 8, 2017 - 8:01am

The original Magdala stone will be on exhibit May 15 until July 23 in Rome. Courtesy/magdala.org

MAGDALA PROJECT News:

The original Magdala stone, the most important archaeological discovery in modern Israel, is going to Rome for an exhibition held by the Jewish Museum and the Vatican.

It is the first time the piece will be exhibited publicly. The exhibition is May 15 until July 23.

The General Director of the Magdala Project, Father Juan Solana, is attending the May 15 opening event.

Help Spread Blessing Of Creativity To Rusinga Island In Kenya

on May 7, 2017 - 4:27pm

Local retired teacher, Sharon Allen, is traveling to Rusinga Island at the end of May with Project Humanity as part of their educational outreach, which also is focusing on creating school libraries. She is looking for help from the Los Alamos community to collect lightly used and new art supplies for these artists. Courtesy photo

 

Courtesy photo

 

COMMUNITY News:

Project Humanity launched a new initiative Nov. 14, 2016 on Rusinga Island, Kenya - Rusinga Island Artists' Guild. Rusinga Island is in Lake Victoria, Kenya, an area hard hit by AIDS. 

Christopher Gomzy, Project Humanity’s

It’s OK To Ask: Hand Hygiene As A Frontline Defense Against Infection

on May 5, 2017 - 10:35am
By JOYCE RICHINS, RN, Infection Control Specialist
Los Alamos Medical Center

Wash your hands. How many times have we heard that oft-repeated refrain over our lifetimes? Since we were children, we’ve been encouraged to wash our hands after playing outside, before eating, after using the restroom and any one of a number of other occasions.

And not without reason. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 80 percent of infectious diseases are transmitted by touch.

World Futures: INFORMATION - Communication, Both Near and Long Distances

on May 5, 2017 - 9:50am

By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute

• World Futures: What Do We Need?

Simply put, communication is the transfer of data and information from the sender to the receiver. The sender can be a human (or other living entity) or a machine (a non-living entity). Likewise, the receiver can be a human, other living entity, or a machine. But communication does not occur unless the data or information is both sent and received.

The transmission of the data or information can be visual, auditory, sensual, or electronic.

Around The World In White Rock 2013 & 2017

on May 5, 2017 - 9:07am
First year of implementation through the LAPSF Great Idea Grant in 2013. Courtesy photo
 
ART News:
 
The first Multicultural Fair: Around the World in White Rock took place in 2013 when Julie Bulthuis, ELL (English Language Learners) teacher and Renee Mitsunaga, Chamisa Art teacher submitted a Great Ideas Grant from the Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation.
 
Subsequently, the success of the event validated funding through the Fine Arts Education Act authorized by our former Superintendent Gene Schmidt.
 
Every year the event grew to more participants.

Los Alamos Doctor And Paramedic Return From Mosul

on May 5, 2017 - 7:04am

The KOB Channel 4 news truck rolled into town Wednesday to interview Los Alamos physician Dr. Christopher Hammond and paramedic Tylerr Jones at Los Alamos Medical Center. Hammond and Jones just returned from serving a three-week deployment in Iraq that included two weeks in Mosul, a city engulfed in the war between ISIS and Iraqi forces. Photo by Maire O'Neill/ladailypost.com

Retired LANL Scientists: Attacks On Science, EPA Are Foolhardy, Dangerous

on May 4, 2017 - 10:11am

By retired LANL scientists: Chris Barnes, Ph.D.; Fairley Barnes, Ph.D.; James Bradbury, Ph.D.; James Cost, Ph.D.; Margaret Cox, Ph.D.; Larry Deaven, Ph.D.; Terry Foxx; Mikkel Johnson, Ph.D. and Laboratory Fellow; Charles F. (Chick) Keller, Ph.D.; Arvid S. Lundy; F.J. (Jeff) Martin; Caroline (Cas) Mason, Ph.D.; Rodney (Rod) Mason, Ph.D.; Donald A. Neeper, Ph.D.; Cheryl Rofer; Marvin VanDilla, Ph.D.; David Watkins, Ph.D. and Mike Williams, Ph.D.

On April 22, New Mexicans across the state stood up for scientific integrity in the face of attacks on the role of science in our daily lives.

That

LANL: Roelofs Takes Director Role At Center For Integrated Nanotechnologies

on May 2, 2017 - 9:10am

Noted physicist Andreas Roelofs is the new director of the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

Noted physicist Andreas Roelofs is the new director of the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT), a Department of Energy-funded nanoscience research facility with a core center at Sandia National Laboratories and a gateway research site at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

CINT provides users from around the world with access to state-of-the-art expertise and instrumentation in a collaborative, multidisciplinary environment with a focus on nanoscience

Reporters Without Borders Releases 2017 World Press Freedom Index

on May 2, 2017 - 5:25am
RSF News:
 
Reporters Without Borders (RSF) has released its 2017 World Press Freedom Index. 
 
The 2017 World Press Freedom Index compiled by RSF reflects a world in which attacks on the media have become commonplace and strongmen are on the rise ... an age of post-truth, propaganda and suppression of freedoms – especially in democracies.
 
RSF’s latest World Press Freedom Index highlights the danger of a tipping point in the state of media freedom in many countries. Media freedom has retreated wherever the authoritarian strongman model has triumphed.

Letter To The Editor: Reply To Reply To Sen. Heinrich

on April 30, 2017 - 9:45pm

By KHALIL J. SPENCER
Los Alamos

 

I read James Griffin's reply to Sen. Martin Heinrich in utter disbelief (letter). Sure, a 42,000 gallon spill is a drop in the proverbial oceanic bucket.
 
But as far as the risks of drilling offshore, and especially in the harsh waters of the Arctic, it's not the often but small disasters that will kill you. Like Fukushima, it's the big ones.
 
I will utter two phrases and let readers judge for themselves:
 
1. Exxon Valdez shipwreck.
 
2. Deepwater Horizion Oil Spill.
 
 

Letter To The Editor: Reply To Senator Heinrich

on April 30, 2017 - 8:23pm
By JAMES GRIFFIN
Los Alamos

Sen. Martin Heinrich predicts doom if drilling in the arctic for oil is permitted (link). He uses amazing statistics from the Department of Interior to back up this claim.

Evidently there is a 75 percent chance of a 42,000-gallon spill. Let's pretend to be rational. Assume this to be true. How large is the arctic?

Will 42,000 gallons have any impact! No!

US underwater drilling for oil began in 1891, approximately 126 years ago. Notice that the oceans are devastated.

Heinrich: Opening Up Arctic Ocean To Drilling Poses Serious Risks

on April 29, 2017 - 8:35am

U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich

From the Office of U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich:

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In response to President Trump’s executive orders removing protections and moving to reopen risky offshore drilling, U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.) joined U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) to introduce the Stop Arctic Ocean Drilling Act, a major piece of legislation to permanently protect the Arctic from offshore drilling.

The legislation would prevent any new or renewed leases for the exploration, development, or production of oil, natural gas, or any other mineral in the Arctic Ocean planning

History Museum Explores Turn-Of-The-Century Syria In A Post-ISIS World

on April 28, 2017 - 11:10am
Album of Mideast archaeology explorations conducted by Howard Crosby Butler. Courtesy/NMHM
 
NMHM News:
 
SANTA FE  As Syria’s ongoing civil war, staggering death toll, and displacement of thousands of refugees threatens to destroy Syrian culture, the Palace of the Governors will display seven albums of photographs of historic sites in Syria taken between 1899 and 1909.
 
Entitled Syria: Cultural Patrimony Under Threat, the exhibition will include multi-functional information kiosks with insights into Syrian people and culture.

New Mexicans March For Climate, Jobs And Justice

on April 28, 2017 - 10:54am
SIERRA CLUB News:
 
New Mexicans are invited to take to the streets Saturday, April 29, to call for a strong government response to the global climate crisis.
 
People’s Climate Marches are planned in the state’s largest three cities: Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe. New Mexicans will join more than 100,000 people nationwide in more than 300 cities, representing a growing popular movement for climate justice.
 
From the disruption of ecosystems, a loss of biodiversity, an increase in extreme weather, rising seas, and the spread of new diseases, to resource scarcity that exacerbates

Letter To The Editor: Immigration Is A Serious Matter

on April 27, 2017 - 8:10am
By NANCY SCHICK
LAHS U.S. History teacher, 1987-2006
2005 New Mexico Teacher of the Year

In response to the April 26 “Home of the Brave” letter, I’ll be brief.

The message, jumbled as it was, was nativist and ugly. The writer failed to address the issue raised by Mr. Goldman (link); immigration is a serious matter, one that demands rational conversation, not invective. No one who wants to have his argument heard tells an American to go back to anywhere.
 
And as a history teacher, I am certainly relieved that the writer did not learn his history in my class (and grateful that Mr.

LANL: Managing Disease Spread Through Accessible Modeling

on April 26, 2017 - 7:23am

The research draws on Los Alamos’ expertise in computational modeling and health sciences and contributes to the Laboratory’s national security mission by protecting against biological threats. Infectious diseases are a leading cause of death globally. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Lower computing requirements and streamlined data analysis support public-health decision making

A new computer modeling study from Los Alamos National Laboratory is aimed at making epidemiological models more accessible and useful for public-health collaborators and improving disease-related decision making.

“In a

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