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Reporters Without Borders Releases 2017 World Press Freedom Index

on May 2, 2017 - 5:25am
RSF News:
 
Reporters Without Borders (RSF) has released its 2017 World Press Freedom Index. 
 
The 2017 World Press Freedom Index compiled by RSF reflects a world in which attacks on the media have become commonplace and strongmen are on the rise ... an age of post-truth, propaganda and suppression of freedoms – especially in democracies.
 
RSF’s latest World Press Freedom Index highlights the danger of a tipping point in the state of media freedom in many countries. Media freedom has retreated wherever the authoritarian strongman model has triumphed.

Letter To The Editor: Reply To Reply To Sen. Heinrich

on April 30, 2017 - 9:45pm

By KHALIL J. SPENCER
Los Alamos

 

I read James Griffin's reply to Sen. Martin Heinrich in utter disbelief (letter). Sure, a 42,000 gallon spill is a drop in the proverbial oceanic bucket.
 
But as far as the risks of drilling offshore, and especially in the harsh waters of the Arctic, it's not the often but small disasters that will kill you. Like Fukushima, it's the big ones.
 
I will utter two phrases and let readers judge for themselves:
 
1. Exxon Valdez shipwreck.
 
2. Deepwater Horizion Oil Spill.
 
 

Letter To The Editor: Reply To Senator Heinrich

on April 30, 2017 - 8:23pm
By JAMES GRIFFIN
Los Alamos

Sen. Martin Heinrich predicts doom if drilling in the arctic for oil is permitted (link). He uses amazing statistics from the Department of Interior to back up this claim.

Evidently there is a 75 percent chance of a 42,000-gallon spill. Let's pretend to be rational. Assume this to be true. How large is the arctic?

Will 42,000 gallons have any impact! No!

US underwater drilling for oil began in 1891, approximately 126 years ago. Notice that the oceans are devastated.

Heinrich: Opening Up Arctic Ocean To Drilling Poses Serious Risks

on April 29, 2017 - 8:35am

U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich

From the Office of U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich:

WASHINGTON, D.C. – In response to President Trump’s executive orders removing protections and moving to reopen risky offshore drilling, U.S. Sen. Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.) joined U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) to introduce the Stop Arctic Ocean Drilling Act, a major piece of legislation to permanently protect the Arctic from offshore drilling.

The legislation would prevent any new or renewed leases for the exploration, development, or production of oil, natural gas, or any other mineral in the Arctic Ocean planning

History Museum Explores Turn-Of-The-Century Syria In A Post-ISIS World

on April 28, 2017 - 11:10am
Album of Mideast archaeology explorations conducted by Howard Crosby Butler. Courtesy/NMHM
 
NMHM News:
 
SANTA FE  As Syria’s ongoing civil war, staggering death toll, and displacement of thousands of refugees threatens to destroy Syrian culture, the Palace of the Governors will display seven albums of photographs of historic sites in Syria taken between 1899 and 1909.
 
Entitled Syria: Cultural Patrimony Under Threat, the exhibition will include multi-functional information kiosks with insights into Syrian people and culture.

New Mexicans March For Climate, Jobs And Justice

on April 28, 2017 - 10:54am
SIERRA CLUB News:
 
New Mexicans are invited to take to the streets Saturday, April 29, to call for a strong government response to the global climate crisis.
 
People’s Climate Marches are planned in the state’s largest three cities: Albuquerque, Las Cruces and Santa Fe. New Mexicans will join more than 100,000 people nationwide in more than 300 cities, representing a growing popular movement for climate justice.
 
From the disruption of ecosystems, a loss of biodiversity, an increase in extreme weather, rising seas, and the spread of new diseases, to resource scarcity that exacerbates

Letter To The Editor: Immigration Is A Serious Matter

on April 27, 2017 - 8:10am
By NANCY SCHICK
LAHS U.S. History teacher, 1987-2006
2005 New Mexico Teacher of the Year

In response to the April 26 “Home of the Brave” letter, I’ll be brief.

The message, jumbled as it was, was nativist and ugly. The writer failed to address the issue raised by Mr. Goldman (link); immigration is a serious matter, one that demands rational conversation, not invective. No one who wants to have his argument heard tells an American to go back to anywhere.
 
And as a history teacher, I am certainly relieved that the writer did not learn his history in my class (and grateful that Mr.

LANL: Managing Disease Spread Through Accessible Modeling

on April 26, 2017 - 7:23am

The research draws on Los Alamos’ expertise in computational modeling and health sciences and contributes to the Laboratory’s national security mission by protecting against biological threats. Infectious diseases are a leading cause of death globally. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Lower computing requirements and streamlined data analysis support public-health decision making

A new computer modeling study from Los Alamos National Laboratory is aimed at making epidemiological models more accessible and useful for public-health collaborators and improving disease-related decision making.

“In a

Air Force Nuclear Weapons Center Team Supports ICBM Test Launch

on April 25, 2017 - 1:48pm
KAFB News:
 
KIRTLAND AFB  A team of Air Force Nuclear Weapons Center experts supported the recent launch of an unarmed intercontinental ballistic missile to verify its accuracy and reliability, providing valuable data to ensure a continued safe, secure and effective nuclear deterrent.
 
An unarmed LGM-30G Minuteman III missile equipped with three test reentry vehicles was launched Feb. 8 during an operational test flight. The Minuteman III reentry vehicles contained test instrumentation and traveled about 4,200 miles to the Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands.
 
The flight tests

Alex Kirk Factors Big In Game 2 Of EuroLeague Playoffs

on April 23, 2017 - 12:42pm

Coming into Game 2 of the EuroLeague playoffs against Olympiacos, Anadolu Efes had been winless on the road in the history of the competition ... but then, Alex Kirk happened. Courtesy/Eurohoops

Alex Kirk of Los Alamos celebrates with teammate Thomas Heurtel. Courtesy/Eurohoops

 

By Antonis Stroggylakis
Twitter.com/AStroggylakis

With 53 seconds left in last night’s (21/4) match between Olympiacos and Anadolu Efes in Piraeus, the score was tied 71-71. The Turkish team had erased the 8-point deficit in the middle of the fourth quarter but their task of leaving Piraeus

Mexico Mission Service Talk At United Church Today

on April 23, 2017 - 8:21am
Mission campers prepare to head out for day one building homes during spring break in Puerto Penasco. Photo by Keith Lewis

COMMUNITY News:

Participants in the Mexico Mission Trip taken during spring break will share their experiences by leading the worship service at 9:30 a.m. today at the United Church.

The team of roughly 50 members from the community, the Unitarian Universalist Church and the United Church of Los Alamos, spent a week building three homes for the less fortunate, changing lives forever and leaving three families with a gift that they need not repay.

One family consists

Los Alamos Physician Provides Aid In Mosul

on April 21, 2017 - 5:53am
From left, Paramedic Derrik Ross from Melbourne, Australia; LAMC Physician Dr. Christopher Hammond, Los Alamos Paramedic Tylerr Jones and a first responder. Courtesy photo
 

By KIRSTEN LASKEY
Los Alamos Daily Post

Los Alamos Medical Center Physician Christopher Hammond works with bullets slicing through the air and bombs exploding all around him. As a member of Global Outreach Doctors, Hammond is serving a three-week deployment in Iraq that includes two weeks in Mosul, a city engulfed in the war between ISIS and Iraqi forces.

He is joined by Tylerr Jones, a RN/EMT from White Rock.

Why Can We See And Hear Meteors At The Same Time?

on April 21, 2017 - 5:28am
A new study explains why we can hear meteors at the same time as we see them. Courtesy photo
 
By LAUREN LIPUMA
AGU Blogosphere
 
Light travels nearly a million times faster than sound. But for thousands of years, humans have reported hearing some meteors as they pass overhead, puzzling scientists for decades.
 
Now, a new study puts forth a simple explanation for the phenomenon: the sound waves aren’t coming from the meteor itself. Instead, radio waves created by the meteor convert to sound waves when they strike metal structures on Earth.
 
Edmund Halley – namesake of the famous

World Futures: INFORMATION - What And How Do We Teach People?

on April 21, 2017 - 5:15am

World Futures: What Do We Need?

By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute

It was not that long ago that we went to school to learn the three R’s – Reading, Writing, and Arithmetic. These skills served the student well as the foundation for learning other skills, communicating, and doing basic mathematical calculations of everyday life.  Today reading is often supplanted by video, writing has given way to keyboarding, and mathematics has become a smart phone application.

Video increases the speed of information transmission, keyboarding increases speed of composition, and the smart

Los Alamos/Japan Project Making History

on April 21, 2017 - 4:52am
HISTORICAL SOCIETY News:
 
In just one year since it’s founding, the Los Alamos/Japan Project is already building a bridge of understanding between Los Alamos, Hiroshima, and Nagasaki—and making history around the globe.
  • For the second year in a row, the National Trust for Historic Preservation has awarded a grant to the Los Alamos/Japan Project.

Culture & Collaboration: Los Alamos Japan Project Friday

on April 19, 2017 - 2:59pm
HISTORICAL SOCIETY News:
 
The Los Alamos Japan Project is an expansive, long-term project to develop dialogue with international museum colleagues and pursue understanding between Los Alamos, Hiroshima, and Nagasaki.
 
Founded by Museum Director Judith Stauber, the project is building a bridge of understanding between Los Alamos History Museum, the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, and the Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum.
 
The global histories of the United States and Japan are inexorably linked, but the cultures reveal a separateness.

Periodic Model Predicts Spread Of Lyme Disease

on April 18, 2017 - 5:34pm
SIAM News:
 
PHILADELPHIA, PA — Lyme disease is among the most common vector-borne illnesses in North America, Europe, and some parts of Asia. A spirochete bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi causes the disease, and blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) are responsible for the majority of North American transmissions.
 
Commonly known as deer ticks, blacklegged ticks exhibit two-year life cycles with the following four stages: eggs, larvae, nymphs, and adults. Larvae primarily attack white-footed mice, then become nymphs upon obtaining a blood meal.

President Trump In Syria: A New Foreign Policy?

on April 17, 2017 - 8:48am

Professor Nader Hashemi

SFCIR News:

Following the recent missile strike in Syria, and the new chill with Russia, is President Trump's foreign policy in the Middle East taking shape? What will the administration's policy toward ISIS be? Toward Syrian refugees? Toward Assad?

The
Santa Fe Council on International (SFCIR) invites the community to hear Professor Nader Hashemi share his insights Thursday on evolving US foreign policy considerations.

Professor Hashemi is director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the Korbel School of International Studies, University of Denver.

“It’s no

Letter To The Editor: Will Los Alamos Remain ‘Home Of The Brave’?

on April 17, 2017 - 8:25am
By TERRY GOLDMAN
Los Alamos

As I was an authorized immigrant to and am now a citizen of the United States, you might think that, having followed the legal requirements, I would not be supportive of all refugees and immigrants, whatever their status. Nothing could be further from the truth. Although I did not leave Canada out of fear or persecution, I did learn some relevant history there that most Americans are not likely to have encountered.

The two main early European waves of immigrants to North America were from England and France, but they were of completely different characters.

Los Alamos Fire Chief Troy Hughes And Naval Postgraduate Program Target Safe Travel

on April 17, 2017 - 7:41am

Courtesy photo

Staff Report

Los Alamos Fire Chief Troy Hughes is taking part in the Naval Postgraduate Program and is enlisted as a member of a small working group that consists of a TSA agent, California Highway Patrol captain, Fairfax, Va., Fire captain, Seattle Police commander and deputy chief of the Tucson Police. As a class assignment, Hughes and his group have written several columns related to travel with the focus on how to be safe while traveling.

Here is the first column in the series:

Hello current and future travelers, welcome aboard!

Bandelier's First Astronomy Program Of Season April 22

on April 16, 2017 - 9:33am
Bandelier National Monument's first astronomy program of the season is 8 p.m. Saturday, April 22, in the Juniper Campground Amphitheater. The community is invited to join them for a Ranger talk, followed by viewing the universe through giant telescopes! Courtesy/National Park Service

Griggs: Macaws On My Mind At Copán, Honduras

on April 16, 2017 - 7:31am
David Griggs poses with macaws in the interactive plaza at Macaw Mountain Bird Park & Nature Reserve. Courtesy photo
 
By DAVID H. GRIGGS
Foreign Correspondent
Los Alamos Daily Post
 
Posing with lavishly colored macaws perched on my head and arms was a great photo op and the highlight of the tour. Macaw Mountain Bird Park & Nature Reserve is a beautiful home for rescued birds in Copán Ruins, Honduras.
 
The history of bird park began on the Caribbean island of Roatan in the 1980s.

Inert Nuclear Gravity Bomb Passes First F-16 Flight Test

on April 15, 2017 - 10:37am

Air Force F-16 aircraft. Courtesy/Kirtland AFB

KIRTLAND AFB News:

The non-nuclear bomb assembly used for the flight test was designed and manufactured by LANL and SNL

An Air Force F-16 aircraft released an inert B61 nuclear bomb in a test recently, demonstrating the aircrafts capability to deliver the weapon and testing the functioning of the weapon's non-nuclear components, including the arming and fire control system, radar altimeter, spin rocket motors and weapons control computer.

The F-16 from the 422nd Test and Evaluation Squadron at Nellis AFB, Nevada, released the weapon over

Udall On Trump Refusal To Release Visitor Logs

on April 15, 2017 - 10:35am

U.S. Sen. Tom Udall

From the Office of U.S. Sen. Tom Udall:

WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Sen. Tom Udall released the following statement Friday on the Trump administration’s decision that it will not release White House visitor logs, breaking with the pro-transparency precedent set by the Obama administration.

“This stunning decision from the Trump White House raises an obvious question: what is President Trump trying to hide? Once again, this administration is stonewalling information that Congress and the American people have a right to see.

New Chamisa K-Kids Club Collects Books For African School Library

on April 15, 2017 - 6:35am
Chamisa K-Kids show off some of the books they have collected for Bwaila LEA School in Zomba City, Malawi, Africa. Courtesy photo

EDUCATION News:

The new Chamisa School K-Kids Club is collecting books to create a 1,000 book school library for the Bwaila LEA School in Zomba City, Malawi, Africa. This is being done in cooperation with the African Library Project. (Learn more at www.africanlibraryproject.org ).

The project  has created more than 2,000 school libraries in English-speaking African schools over the last 10 years.

During the next month, the students will be collecting new and

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