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UPDATE: Hummingbird Monitoring Research Aug. 12

on August 4, 2017 - 6:34am
Broad-tailed Hummingbird. Photo by Bob Walker
 
Update: The time of the first session is changed to 7:30 a.m. Aug.12.
 
PEEC News:
 
Curious about the effects of climate change on hummingbird populations? Researcher Bob Walker will lead two groups, one at 7:30 a.m. and one at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 12, to the hummingbird monitoring site in Bandelier National Monument.
 
This location is one of a network of sites in the Western U.S. that tracks the impact of climate change on the movement and behavior of hummingbirds. To join one of the groups, visit peecnature.org to register.

New Program Explores University Of Chicago’s Role In Manhattan Project

on August 3, 2017 - 9:40am
AHF News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C.  “For the first time, atomic power had been released. It had been controlled and stopped,” Arthur Holly Compton declared.
 
Dec. 2, 1942, Compton, a Nobel Prize-winning physicist, and 48 other Manhattan Project scientists and workers witnessed Chicago Pile-1 (CP-1), the first controlled, self-sustained nuclear chain reaction, go critical under Stagg Field at the University of Chicago.
 
This year marks the 75th anniversary of this landmark event that ushered in the Atomic Age.

Los Alamos County, LANL And Summer Interns Partner To Test Cutting Edge Technology

on August 3, 2017 - 8:17am

From left, UNM student Ben Narushof, UNM post-doctorate Ali Ozdagli, UNM Assistant Professor Dr. Fernando Moreu, LANL Engineering Institute's Dr. David Mascarenas, first year doctoral student JoAnn Ballor from Michigan, University of California in San Diego student Miranda Mellor, Southern University and AM College student Oscar McClain and County Engineer Eric Martinez are partnering to test hololens, which are being modeled by Moreu. Photo by Kirsten Laskey/ladailypost.com

 

UNM Assistant Professor Dr. Fernando Moreu demonstrates how hololens work. Photo by Kirsten Laskey/ladailypost.com

NASA: Total Solar Eclipse Monday, Aug. 21

on August 2, 2017 - 2:46pm

Total solar eclipse Aug. 21. Courtesy/NASA

NASA News:

All of North America will be treated Monday, Aug. 21, to an eclipse of the sun. Anyone within the path of totality can see one of nature’s most awe inspiring sights ... a total solar eclipse.

This path, where the moon will completely cover the sun and the sun's tenuous atmosphere - the corona - can be seen, will stretch from Salem, Ore. to Charleston, S.C. Observers outside this path will still see a partial solar eclipse where the moon covers part of the sun's disk.

NASA created this website (link) to provide a guide to this amazing

NASA Contracts With University Of Alabama At Birmingham To Develop New Orbiting Hardware

on August 1, 2017 - 9:49am
This conceptual drawing of Iceberg shows the modular nature of the units. Unlike MELFI's permanent structure, these units can be removed from the rack and returned to earth in the event that they ever need repairs or refurbishing. Courtesy photo
 
UAB News:
 
BIRMINGHAM, Ala.  NASA has a plan for the future of space research, and it is counting on University of Alabama at Birmingham engineers to help make it a reality.
 
The UAB Engineering Innovation and Technology Development research group recently received a contract worth $6.2 million over the next three years to design and build

LANL: Single-Photon Emitter Has Promise For Quantum Info-Processing

on July 31, 2017 - 1:00pm

LANL researchers have produced the first known material capable of single-photon emission at room temperature and at telecommunications wavelengths, using chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes. These quantum light emitters are important for optically-based quantum information processing and information security, ultrasensitive sensing, metrology and imaging needs and as photon sources for quantum optics studies. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Carbon nanotubes form first known tunable room-temperature quantum emitters at telecom wavelengths

Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced the first

American Geophysical Union Announces 2017 Fellows

on July 27, 2017 - 9:08am

The American Geophysical Union headquarters in Washington, D.C. Courtesy/AGU

AGU News:

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The American Geophysical Union (AGU) today announced its 2017 Fellows, an honor given to individual AGU members who have made exceptional scientific contributions and gained prominence in their respective fields of Earth and space sciences.

Since the AGU Fellows program was established in 1962, and according to the organization’s bylaws, no more than 0.01 percent of the total membership of AGU is recognized annually.

Museums’ Fossil Mammal Research Project Gets Grant

on July 27, 2017 - 7:13am
Skull of an early Paleocene mammal collected from New Mexico from the collections of the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science. Courtesy/NMMNHS
 
NSF News:
 
ALBUQUERQUE  The National Science Foundation has awarded the New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science a $101,125 grant to support research on early placental mammals and STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art and math) educational programs. 
 
The project, aims to shed light on how mammals fared after the Cretaceous extinction (K-Pg extinction), an event most famous for the demise of the non-avian dinosaurs.

Lightning Measure In Downtown Los Alamos Today

on July 26, 2017 - 1:35pm

Here is a measure of the lightning striking during a 30 minute period this afternoon in downtown Los Alamos. Courtesy/Morris B. Pongratz

LANL Information Scientist Herbert Van de Sompel To Receive Paul Evan Peters Award

on July 26, 2017 - 9:51am

Herbert Van De Sompel, an information scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, will recieve the Paul Evan Peters Award.

LANL News:

  • Networked infrastructure to support scholarship among his contributions

Herbert Van de Sompel, research scientist at the Research Library of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, has been named the 2017 recipient of the Paul Evan Peters Award from the Coalition for Networked Information (CNI), the Association of Research Libraries, and EDUCAUSE.

The award recognizes notable, lasting achievements in the creation and innovative use of network-based information

LAF&SF Features Hope: Science, Religion, And The Future At Unitarian Church 6 p.m. Wednesday

on July 24, 2017 - 8:36pm

LAF&SF News: 

Religions provide varieties of short-term, long-term, and eternal hopes and pathways to them. In our culture everyone is free to choose from these hopes or to live without them.

In this final session of the Faith and Science Forum, which is Wednesay, a panel is scheduled to share four faith perspectives on hope: Rabbi Jack Shlachter (also a scientist) will present Jewish hopes; Connon Odom (engineer and Los Alamos Church of Christ deacon) will present comments on Christian hope versus optimism from N.T.

NNSA Conducts Aerial Radiation Assessment Survey

on July 24, 2017 - 9:03am
NNSA News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C.  The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration’s (DOE/NNSA) conducted a low-altitude helicopter flight over portions of the Arlington, Va., area July 22 to measure naturally occurring background radiation.
 
Officials from NNSA announced that the radiation assessment covers approximately three square miles. A twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter, operated by the Remote Sensing Laboratory Aerial Measuring System from Joint Base Andrews, was equipped with radiation sensing technology.
 
The helicopter flew in a grid pattern over the

NOAA’s Climate.Gov: Natural Wetlands, Tropical Agriculture Cause Methane Increases, Not Oil And Gas

on July 24, 2017 - 7:59am
Courtesy/NOAA
 
NOAA News:
 
“Agricultural and wetland emissions” from the planet’s tropical areas, not oil and gas activities in the United States, are more than likely responsible for a post-2007 global increase in methane levels, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate.gov.
 
But regulating or mitigating those methane sources could be difficult or impossible.
 
“Both of the likely contenders for the recent increase in emissions could be tricky to mitigate,” wrote Climate.gov’s Rebecca Lindsey and Michon Scott.

LANL: Neutrino Research Takes Giant Leap Forward

on July 20, 2017 - 4:31pm

This illustration shows the 800-mile/1300-kilometer path from Fermilab to the Sanford Underground Research Facility, straight through the earth. Courtesy/Fermilab
  • The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment will send particles 800 miles to a mile-deep detector in South Dakota

LANL News:

In a unique groundbreaking ceremony July 21 at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, S.D., an international group of dignitaries, scientists and engineers will mark the start of construction of a massive experiment that could change our understanding of the universe.

Savannah River Site Reaches Milestone In Supplying Tritium For National Defense

on July 20, 2017 - 4:20pm

SAVANNAH RIVER News:

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The National Nuclear Security Administration’s Savannah River Tritium Enterprise (SRTE) in Aiken, S.C., has conducted three tritium extractions in fiscal year 2017, marking the first time the Tritium Extraction Facility has performed more than one extraction in a year.

 “Achieving this significant milestone – especially doing it safely, securely, and in a disciplined manner – has required a tremendous team effort on the part of the entire SRTE team,” said Lt. Gen. Frank G.

Tonight ... Science On Tap: Preparing For The Eclipse

on July 20, 2017 - 4:13pm

LA CREATIVE DISTRICT News:

A full solar eclipse will pass over much of the United States Friday. It’s a rare opportunity indeed. Join us tonight at Science On Tap, at 5:30 p.m. at UnQuarked in Los Alamos to prepare!

The last such eclipse was in February of 1979 and the next one won’t be until October 2023. What makes these celestial transits special is an opportunity to view the sun’s corona (or its extensive low-density atmosphere) when it is visible. It is only during a total solar eclipse that such investigation is possible.

Join Galen Gisler, a Lab scientist with our XTD Integrated

ORNL: Titan Simulations Show Importance Of Close 2-Way Coupling Between Human And Earth Systems

on July 20, 2017 - 7:48am
OLCF’s Titan advances delivery of accelerated, high-resolution earth system model with human dimensions. Courtesy photo
 
ORNL News:
 
Oak Ridge National Laboratory announces that its Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) has developed a new integrated computational climate model to reduce uncertainties in future climate predictions marks the first successful attempt to bridge Earth systems with energy and economic models and large-scale human impact data.
 
The integrated Earth System Model, or iESM, is being used to explore interactions between the physical climate system,

3-D Models Help Scientists Gauge Flood Impact

on July 20, 2017 - 7:14am
Iowa Flood Center team performs one of the first 3-D RANS simulations of dam breaks in a natural environment. Courtesy photo
 
IFC News:
 
Heavy rainfall can cause rivers and drainage systems to overflow or dams to break, leading to flood events that bring damage to property and road systems as well potential loss of human life.
 
A team from the Iowa Flood Center (IFC) at the University of Iowa, led by UI Professor George Constantinescu, is creating 3-D non-hydrostatic flood models that can more accurately simulate flood wave propagation and account for the interaction between the

LANL: Simulation Reveals Universal Signature Of Chaos In Ultracold Reactions

on July 19, 2017 - 8:26am

A two-dimensional slice of the potential energy surface for the K + KRb reaction. The reaction proceeds from right to left. In the intermediate region a deep well is clearly visible which leads to chaotic motion. Image courtesy Los Alamos National Laboratory. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Findings have implications for quantum computing, other technologies

Researchers have performed the first ever quantum-mechanical simulation of the benchmark ultracold chemical reaction between potassium-rubidium (KRb) and a potassium atom, opening the door to new controlled chemistry experiments and quantum

National Awards Recognize Los Alamos National Laboratory Leadership In Nuclear Safeguards

on July 17, 2017 - 5:37pm

Nancy Jo Nicholas, Los Alamos National Laboratory’s associate director for threat identification and response, was recognized with the Edway R. Johnson Meritorious Service award by the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

Two Los Alamos National Laboratory employees were recognized today by the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management for their contributions to the nuclear safeguards profession.

Nancy Jo Nicholas, the Laboratory’s associate director for threat identification and response, was recognized with the Edway R. Johnson Meritorious Service award.

ScienceFest Schedule Of Events Today!

on July 15, 2017 - 8:41pm

ScienceFest News:

Schedule of ScienceFest events for Sunday, July 16:

FLIGHT OF THE ORIGAMI CRANES!
Los Alamos History Museum
Each year the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum and the Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum receive thousands of donated paper cranes from around the world. Create YOUR crane to send to Japan at Culture and Collaboration: The Los Alamos/Japan Project, an exhibit on display at the Los Alamos History Museum until July 20. The Los Alamos History Museum will deliver community cranes to Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August.

Scenes From ScienceFest 2017 At Ashley Pond Park

on July 15, 2017 - 8:30pm
Los Alamos celebrated ScienceFest today at Ashley Pond Park. The event had a Ranch School theme. Canoe rides were part of the fun. Photo by Bonnie J. Gordon/ladailypost.com
 
These recent Los Alamos High School graduates competed in the Colorado Kinetic Sculpture Race in June. Their sculpture was The Manhattan Project and had a mad scientist theme. They won First Place in the Virgin (first time in the race) catagory. They plan to compete again next year. Photo by Bonnie J. Gordon/ladailypost.com
 
Building molecules with marshmallows at the UNM-Los Alamos booth. Photo by Bonnie J.

Public Astronomy Dark Night July 22

on July 15, 2017 - 5:03am
Pajarito Astronomers News:
 
The Pajarito Astronomers will be holding a County-Sponsored Dark Night at 8:15 p.m., (sunset) Saturday, July 22, at Spirio Soccer Field, Overlook Park.  
 
Weather permitting, the public is invited to come out, wander among the telescopes, and star gaze. Mercury, Jupiter and its moons and Saturn with its rings and moons will potentially be visible during the evening. There will be a tour of the summer constellations, the Milky Way, and there will be telescope views of double stars, star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies.
 
The public is invited and encouraged

ScienceFest Schedule Of Events: Saturday July 15

on July 14, 2017 - 7:11pm

ScienceFest News:

ScienceFest Schedule for Saturday July 15:

This major event celebrates the science in everyday life in hands-on, interactive experiences. Great for millennials, families and kids, ScienceFest highlights the groundbreaking science that still happens in Los Alamos. This year’s theme is “100th Anniversary of the Ranch School.” Discover Ranch School Days – without the Ranch School, the Manhattan Project would not have been located here.

Los Alamos Ashley Pond Park
10am-3pm

FREE admission

MAIN GATE PARK FESTIVAL INFORMATION BOOTH & PHOTO OPP
Main Gate Park
9am-2pm

ASHLEY POND PARK

ScienceFest Curiosity Challenge Goes Live!

on July 14, 2017 - 10:57am

ScienceFest News:

This year ScienceFest attendees will have the chance to compete with one and other in an exciting and interactive scavenger hunt.

Participants can accumulate points by completing challenges and experiencing all of the entertainment ScienceFest has to offer. The person or team with the most points at the end of the challenge will win a brand new Yeti cooler!

Joining the challenge is easy.

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