Skip directly to content

Science

James M. Boncella, Los Alamos Actinide Chemist, Named Fellow In American Chemical Society

on June 26, 2017 - 10:35am

James M. Boncella selected as a 2017 Fellow in the American Chemical Society. Courtsy/LANL 

LANL News:

James M. Boncella, deputy group leader in Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Inorganic, Isotope and Actinide Chemistry group, has been selected as a 2017 Fellow in the American Chemical Society (ACS). 

The ACS Fellows Program recognizes members who have both made exceptional scientific contributions and who have provided excellent volunteer service to the ACS community.

Boncella was selected as Fellow for his seminal discoveries in actinide chemistry and for his long and distinguished

LAF&SF Features Bob Reinovsky Wednesday

on June 26, 2017 - 9:29am

The community is invited to attend the LAF&SF talk by Bob Reinovsky Wednesday at 1738 N Sage Loop. Courtesy/ESA/Hubble, NASA

LAF&SF News:

Bob Reinovsky continues the Los Alamos Faith and Science Forum summer series Wednesday, June 28 by speaking on “Hopelessness”. 

The theme of the summer series talks is “Hope: Science, Religion and the Future”.

The meeting formats include a light supper at 6 p.m., talk at 6:30 p.m., followed by questions for the speaker and then table discussions. These talks are in the Fellowship Hall of the Unitarian Church at 1738 N Sage Loop in Los Alamos.

Dan

Scientists Solve Mystery Of Unexplained 'Bright Nights'

on June 26, 2017 - 7:12am
The different layers of Earth’s airglow can be seen from the International Space Station as it orbits Earth. The very thin green layer above the bottom of the window occurs 95 kilometers (59 miles) above Earth’s surface; the red region above is a different type of airglow. The rectangle represents the portion of the airglow measured in a single WINDII image. Courtesy/American Geophysical Union
 
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C.

AGU: Extraordinary Storms Cause Massive Antarctic Sea Ice Loss In 2016

on June 25, 2017 - 6:39am
By LAUREN LIPUMA
American Geophysical Union
 
A series of unprecedented storms over the Southern Ocean likely caused the most dramatic decline in Antarctic sea ice seen to date, a new study finds.
 
Antarctic sea ice – frozen ocean water that rings the southernmost continent – has grown over the past few decades but declined sharply in late 2016. By March of 2017 – the end of the Southern Hemisphere’s summer – Antarctic sea ice had reached its lowest area since records began in 1978.
 
In a new study, scientists puzzled by the sudden ice loss matched satellite images of Antarctica with

Crowd Gathers For Georgetown Theologian, Professor John Haught Lecture At Fuller Lodge

on June 24, 2017 - 6:17am

A crowd turned out Thursday at Fuller Lodge to hear Professor John Haught lecture on ‘Science, Religion, And Cosmic Purpose’. Photo by Morrie Pongratz

Los Alamos Faith and Science Forum News:

A crowd gathered at Fuller Lodge Thursday evening to hear Georgetown Theologian, Professor John Haught, lecture on “Science, Religion, and Cosmic Purpose”.

Professor Haught addressed the question of whether the universe may reasonably be said to have a purpose. Professor Haught said that evolution has shown us that there is a cosmic drama or story and it is still unfolding.

The Curious Case Of The Warped Kuiper Belt

on June 23, 2017 - 7:36am
A yet-to-be-discovered, unseen ‘planetary mass object’ makes its existence known by ruffling the orbital plane of distant Kuiper Belt objects, according to research by Kat Volk and Renu Malhotra of the UA's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory. The object is pictured on a wide orbit far beyond Pluto in this artist's illustration. Courtesy/Heather Roper/LPL
 
UA News:
 
TUCSON, Ariz. — An unknown, unseen “planetary mass object” may lurk in the outer reaches of our solar system, according to new research on the orbits of minor planets to be published in the Astronomical Journal.
 
This object

SFI: The InterPlanetary Project Panel Discussion July 18

on June 22, 2017 - 4:57am
SFI News:
 
At 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, July 18, The InterPlanetary Project's kick-off event is a panel discussion at the historic Lensic Performing Arts Center in downtown Santa Fe.
 
Panelists will consider questions like these: What will it take to become an InterPlanetary civilization? How should we address the most pressing problems of Earth to tackle a challenge at this scale? What will success mean for future generations?

AGU: Wildfires Pollute Much More Than Previously Thought

on June 21, 2017 - 7:33am
AGU News:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Summer wildfires boost air pollution considerably more than previously believed.
 
Naturally burning timber and brush launch what are called fine particles into the air at a rate three times as high as levels noted in emissions inventories at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, according to a new study. The microscopic specks that form aerosols are a hazard to human health, particularly to the lungs and heart.
 
“Burning biomass produces lots of pollution.

Highly Anticipated 2017 ScienceFest Celebrates 100th Anniversary Of Los Alamos Ranch School

on June 20, 2017 - 4:01pm
SCIENCEFEST News:
 
The highly anticipated annual event, Los Alamos ScienceFest returns this year from July 13–16 and features events packed full of science, adventure, learning, and fun.
 
This year’s theme celebrates the 100th Anniversary of the Los Alamos Ranch School and features special events that allow participants to step back into the past and experience the fun of old-fashioned Ranch School days and summer camps, as well as informative tours and events for the entire family.
 
The Los Alamos Ranch School started in 1917 as a boys’ school that combined academic studies and

Pajarito Astronomers Hold Dark Night June 24

on June 19, 2017 - 3:32pm
PAJARITO ASTRONOMERS News:
 
The Pajarito Astronomers is holding a County sponsored Dark Night at 8:30 p.m. (sunset), Saturday, June 24, at Spirio Soccer Field, Overlook Park in White Rock.
 
Weather permitting, the public is invited to come out, wander among the telescopes, and star gaze. Jupiter and its moons and Saturn with its rings and moons should be visible during the evening. There will be a tour of the summer constellations, and there will be telescope views of double stars, star clusters, nebulae and galaxies.
 
The public is invited and encouraged to attend.

Distinguished Theologian To Speak At Fuller Lodge In Los Alamos Thursday And Friday

on June 19, 2017 - 7:16am
Professor Haught stands in front of Darwin. Courtesy photo
 
LAFSF News:
 
“Why is there something rather than nothing?” This question is posed by two scientists in this month’s issue of Physics Today.
 
This question also intrigues the members of the Los Alamos Faith and Science Forum (http://www.lafsf.org/) and they have invited noted theologian, Distinguished Professor John Haught from Georgetown University, to Los Alamos to help answer it.
 
Professor Haught will be in Los Alamos to speak at 7 p.m., June 22 and June 23, at Fuller Lodge.

Los Alamos Faith And Science Forum June 22-23

on June 17, 2017 - 6:58am

Distinguished Professor John Haught from Georgetown University is coming to Los Alamos June 22-23 to help answer the question,‘Why is there something rather than nothing?’ Courtesy photo

LAFSF News:

“Why is there something rather than nothing?” This question is posed by two scientists in this month’s issue of Physics Today. This question also intrigues the members of the Los Alamos Faith and Science Forum (http://www.lafsf.org/) and they have invited noted theologian, Distinguished Professor John Haught from Georgetown University, to Los Alamos to help answer it.

Professor Haught will be

A Robot Named Rasmussen

on June 16, 2017 - 9:06am

Looking into the robot Rasmussen at the Project Y STEM Center in the Pueblo Complex on Diamond Drive. Photo by Maire O'Neill/ladailypost.com

Members of the Project Y Team 4153 robotics club with their robot Rasmussen. Courtesy photo

 

Photo by MAIRE O'NEILL
Los Alamos Daily Post

Rasmussen is a robot built at the Project Y STEM Center in Los Alamos by high school students and their adult mentors. She is named after Jane Rasmussen who was a part of the Manhattan Project and used early computers at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

“Jane Rasmussen was not necessarily in the limelight but she

Los Alamos Scientist Awarded Giuliano Preparata Medal

on June 15, 2017 - 10:35am

 

Los Alamos scientist Dr. Thomas Claytor was awarded the Giuliano Preparata Medal June 8 in Piedmont, Italy. Photo by Maire O'Neill/ladailypost.com

 

By MAIRE O'NEILL
Los Alamos
 

A Los Alamos scientist known for a modified cold fusion experiment in which he repeatedly got radioactive tritium produced in a low energy system, has been presented with the prestigious Giuliano Preparato Medal. Dr.

Thursday Science On Tap: Space Weather

on June 14, 2017 - 6:35pm

CREATIVE DISTRICT News:

Space is not a dark, cold void as many people think. Instead, it churns with energy—in the form of accelerated particles—that come to us through the sun’s activity. The resulting sunspots and solar storms can disrupt communications, compromise power grids, and even influence your day-to-day life on Earth.

Come to Science On Tap at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, June 15 at UnQuarked Wine Room, 145 Central Park Square, where Geoff Reeves, with the Lab’s Space Science & Applications group, will talk about his research on just how space weather impacts our planet and the

Rotarians Visit Tibbar Plasma Technologies

on June 14, 2017 - 7:50am

Twenty-five Los Alamos Rotarians pay a visit Tuesday afternoon to Tibbar Plasma Technologies at 274 DP Road as part of a vocational tour. Owner Rick Nebel gave a presentation to the group about the company and its revolutionary new plasma-based technology for high voltage direct current (HVDC) converters. The presentation was followed by a tour of the company's lab. Photo by Laura Loy

Rotarians visit Tibbar Plasma Technologies Tuesday as part of a vocational tour. Courtesy/Laura Loy

Physicist Speaks On 'No Wonder You Wonder!'

on June 10, 2017 - 7:26am
Cover of 'No Wonder You Wonder!' by Claude Phipps. Phipps will speak Thursday, June 15 at Mesa Public Library. Courtesy photo

Claude Phipps

LIBRARY News:

What holds a satellite up while it goes around the earth? Why can’t you travel back in time? These are just two of the many questions explored by Claude Phipps in his book “No Wonder You Wonder!” published by Springer International in 2016. Phipps will speak at Mesa Public Library, 7 p.m., Thursday, June 15 in the Upstairs Rotunda. The talk will be followed by a book-signing.

Phipps has degrees from MIT and Stanford, and has spent his

C’YA Provides Science Education To Students

on June 10, 2017 - 7:19am
Chad Lauritzen, seen here at Dixon Elementary School, volunteered to teach science through Champions of Youth Ambitions. The organization celebrates its third anniversary this weekend since gaining its non-profit status in 2014. Photo by Bernadette Lauritzen
 
The very first LANL Foundation grant funded this opportunity for the Future PhDs of Dixon Elementary. Lauritzen still teaches there more than three years later. Photo by Bernadette Lauritzen
 
By BERNADETTE LAURITZEN 
​Los Alamos 
 

Champions of Youth Ambitions (C’YA), a local non-profit will celebrate its third anniversary this

‘Charliecloud’ Simplifies Big Data Supercomputing

on June 7, 2017 - 4:48pm

Streamlined code from Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists Reid Priedhorsky and Tim Randles aims to simplify supercomputer use. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  •  Los Alamos Releases Elegantly Simple High-performance ‘Convenience Bubble’

At Los Alamos National Laboratory, home to more than 100 supercomputers since the dawn of the computing era, elegance and simplicity of programming are highly valued but not always achieved.

LAFSF Summer Series Continues June 14

on June 7, 2017 - 2:18pm
LAFSF News:
 
Morrie Pongratz will present the third installment of the Los Alamos Faith and Science Forum’s summer series Wednesday, June 14.
 
The theme of the talks is “Hope: Science, Religion and the Future”. In this third presentation we encounter “evolution” and discuss the impact of Darwin’s work on our concept of God and the cosmos. The talk will highlight the insights of the scientist and theologian, Teilhard de Chardin, S.J., the author of “The Phenomenon of Man”.
 
The talk will also introduce the work of Georgetown University’s Distinguished Research Professor John Haught,

Brain Waves: Art And Science In Dialogue

on June 5, 2017 - 2:17pm
Brain Waves machine. Courtesy photo
 
NNMC News:
 
A mind reading device that translates thoughts into drops of water. It might sound like the plot to a sci-fi movie, but it’s in fact a real-life collaborative project between an artist, a professor and four Northern New Mexico College engineering students.
 
The project started as the brainchild of Embudo-based ceramicist and glassmaker Shel Neymark, who has been fascinated by the power of the human brain and attempting to reflect its mysteries in his work.
 
“One thing about the brain that’s so interesting is that it’s electrical and

LANL: Girls In STEM Aims To Boost Interest In Science Careers

on June 5, 2017 - 10:42am

Girls from a Northern New Mexico school look on as Amanda Madden, of LANL’s Space Science & Applications group, demonstrates how to build a spectrometer. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • LANL Foundation-funded summer series kicks off today at Abiquiu Elementary

Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Elizabeth Coronado and Kelsey Neal, with support from the Los Alamos National Laboratory Foundation, recently launched a project called Girls in STEM, which aims to improve girls’ attitudes toward science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

“Our hope is that as attitudes improve, girls will be more

Los Alamos Faith And Science Forum 2017 Summer Series Presents Talk By Gerry Wood Wednesday, June 7

on June 4, 2017 - 10:40am

Nels Hoffman speaking at the May 31 Los Alamos Faith and Science Forum. Photo by Morrie Pongratz

LAF&SF News:

This summer the non-denominational Los Alamos Faith and Science Forum (LAF&SF) is presenting a series of talks by local speakers. The theme of the talks is “Hope: Science, Religion and the Future”.

Gerry Wood is next in line to speak and he will address “The Science of Hope” at the Wednesday, June 7 forum. Wood had a 35-year career at Los Alamos National Laboratory after obtaining a Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Texas at Austin.

Wednesday's forum includes a light

Rover Findings Indicate Stratified Lake On Ancient Mars

on June 2, 2017 - 10:31am

Sedimentary Signs of a Martian Lakebed (Shallow Part): This evenly layered rock imaged in 2014 by the Mastcam on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover shows a pattern typical of a lake-floor sedimentary deposit near where flowing water entered a lake. Shallow and deep parts of an ancient Martian lake left different clues in mudstone formed from lakebed deposits. Courtesy/LANL

LANL News:

  • Water carried more oxygen at certain times, depths

A long-lasting lake on ancient Mars provided stable environmental conditions that differed significantly from one part of the lake to another, according to a

Study Shows Humans Have Polluted European Air For 2000 Years

on May 31, 2017 - 10:22am

The Colle Gnifetti Glacier on the Swiss-Italian border where the ice core used in the study was taken. In the bottom right corner, the coring stie can be seen. Photo by Nicole Spaulding

AGU News:

WASHINGTON, DC — A new study combining European ice core data and historical records of the infamous Black Death pandemic of 1349-1353 shows metal mining and smelting have polluted the environment for thousands of years, challenging the widespread belief that environmental pollution began with the Industrial Revolution in the 1700s and 1800s.

The new study, accepted for publication in GeoHealth, a

Pages


Advertisements