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Just One Thing To Do This Week: Embrace Your Pass

on May 5, 2017 - 10:12am

By MARY BETH MAASSEN
Los Alamos

It has occurred to me that I am still hanging on to some frustration and resentment that I need to let go.

Recently when I am meditating-- as various thoughts come and go--I realize there is one concern that pops in and out of my mind on a regular basis. Research studies have documented that persistently feeling resentful affects both our physical and mental health. I thought it was allergies that have been bothering me, but my ah-ha moment tells me it is really Christy Brinkley.

A few months ago 63-year-old Christy Brinkley graced (once again) the cover of

World Futures: INFORMATION - Communication, Both Near and Long Distances

on May 5, 2017 - 9:50am

By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute

• World Futures: What Do We Need?

Simply put, communication is the transfer of data and information from the sender to the receiver. The sender can be a human (or other living entity) or a machine (a non-living entity). Likewise, the receiver can be a human, other living entity, or a machine. But communication does not occur unless the data or information is both sent and received.

The transmission of the data or information can be visual, auditory, sensual, or electronic.

This Week At The Reel Deal

on May 4, 2017 - 5:01pm

McQuiston: Not Texting Is A Start, But There’s More To Safe Driving

on May 4, 2017 - 8:42am
By ALLEN MCQUISTON
The Jemez Agency
 
Many people have a limited definition of “distracted driving”: They think it only means texting behind the wheel. 
 
There’s good reason for that, because texting requires visual, manual and cognitive attention - the same attention required for safe driving. But although texting is perhaps the most dangerous distraction, there are many others that can impact how you drive, whether you realize it or not. And they can be just as deadly.
 
How deadly? According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and U.S.

Cinema Cindy: The Zookeeper’s Wife

on May 3, 2017 - 8:53am
By Cynthia Biddlecomb
Los Alamos
 
“The Zookeeper’s Wife” is a long-awaited film based on the popular 2007 novel by Diane Ackerman.
 
The story is based on actual events during the Nazi occupation of Warsaw, Poland. Not only is the story compelling, it is an important one to learn.
 
Antonina and Jan Zabinski were the keepers of the Warsaw Zoo from 1928 to 1951, he the PhD Zoologist and she the heart of the place. There are heart-warming scenes early in the movie featuring the lovely Antonina (Jessica Chastain), her magic touch with the animals and their apparent devotion to her.

Robinson: Why Should I support The Rec Bond?

on May 2, 2017 - 9:58am
By JAMES ROBINSON
Los Alamos

Today, the ballots for the Recreation bond will be mailed out, and Los Alamos will be tasked with deciding whether or not it wants to invest in its future or stay in the past.

With their vote, money can be invested in modern infrastructure that could stimulate demand in our town beyond our national laboratory for the first time in decades, or keep things the same.

Our wonderful golf course was the gift of the United States government almost 70 years ago, and have a irrigation system to match.

Fr. Glenn: Giving…and Receiving…Criticism with Grace

on April 30, 2017 - 6:23am
By Rev. Glenn Jones
Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church
Los Alamos

Criticism—it’s something we’re quick to give, but loathe to receive. Even helpful and relevant criticism is often met with ire ... though, certainly, when given in the spirit of good will, we would be foolish to disregard it out of hand.

Isn’t criticism/critique the whole purpose of grading in school, or even of peer review? Certainly everyone enjoys being validated, but we all can be blind to our own faults and failures.

Garcia Richard: Legislative Update Continued

on April 30, 2017 - 6:18am
By Rep. Stephanie Garcia Richard
Los Alamos, Santa Fe, Rio Arriba, Sandoval

Two weeks ago, I wrote a story for the Los Alamos Daily Post outlining the Governor’s damaging vetoes to the state budget and the actions that the legislature could take to remedy those cuts, including a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the vetoes.

This week the New Mexico Supreme Court has agreed to take up the petition from the legislature, challenging the Governor’s vetoes. A hearing is scheduled for May 15.

In the meantime, legislators from both the House and Senate are signing on to call

Pastor Raul: Fences And Kids

on April 30, 2017 - 6:13am
By Pastor RAUL GRANILLO
La Vista Church of the Nazarene
White Rock
 
When we were first married, my wife and I lived in the country with a couple of acres of land. I loved the room, but I hated the weeds.
 
So, to find a cheap way to stay ahead of the weeds, we purchased a couple of goats—fainting goats actually, but that’s another story. When the goats weren’t out grazing on our flowers and trees (turns out they didn’t like weeds), we would keep them in a pen that I built for them.

Tales Of Our Times: New Mexico Was Steered By Geologic History And Climate

on April 28, 2017 - 7:39am
Tales of Our Times
By JOHN BARTLIT
New Mexico Citizens
for Clean Air & Water

NM Was Steered by Geologic History and Climate

Once upon a time, shallow seas covered large areas of what has become New Mexico. The ancient seas deposited huge reserves of coal, oil and gas that have been useful to the state’s economy. As the climate dried, an assortment of settlers was drawn to the region. With dry air also came rare vistas and long-range visibility.

Early ones on the scene were Native Americans, who in time were called Indians. In time, others who came would be called ranchers.

This Week At The Reel Deal

on April 27, 2017 - 5:09pm

Smart Design With Suzette: The Garagenous Zone

on April 24, 2017 - 7:07am

By SUZETTE FOX
Los Alamos

Garages have a way of going from (relatively) organized to complete chaos in no time at all. It then becomes a glorified shed. But, let’s face it, garage organization can be daunting and overwhelming. However, if you have a game plan, it can be a piece of cake. In this column, I will help you get started, give options for storage, safety, going green and other tips that you might not have heard before.

The Best Reason to Tackle This Project

If you’re like most of us, your car is a five-figure investment that you can’t do without.

Fr. Glenn: Living The Better Life

on April 23, 2017 - 7:56am
By Rev. Glenn Jones
Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church
Los Alamos

Very often people complain about their lives being tough or difficult. Certainly there are very hard and tragic situations—the unexpected illness and/or death of loved ones, or one’s child pursuing a path toward self-destruction and the like. Yet many of our problems tend to be of our own making, and sometimes our anxieties stem partially from our modern loss of perspective. After all, we here in L.A. County live in what is consistently rated as among the best communities to live in the U.S.

Pastor Granillo: Protecting The Truth

on April 23, 2017 - 7:44am
By PASTOR RAUL GRANILLO 
La Vista Church of the Nazarene

Los Alamos
 
If you’re lying, you’re lying. –John Maxwell
 
I vaguely remember being awakened by a noise as a small child. It was near Christmas time, so I immediately assumed that I had heard Santa in our house. Although I was partially excited about this possibility, I was more afraid than anything, so I tucked myself tightly under the blankets and went back to sleep. The next morning, I wanted to tell my mom about the exciting news.
 
I decided that the story might need some embellishment to convince her it was true, so I

Earth Day Statement From The Nature Conservancy

on April 23, 2017 - 12:54am
By Justin Adams
Global Managing Director, Lands
 
We’re absolutely thrilled to see so much public support out on the streets for science and scientists. My field of environmental science has probably never been more important as today - and yet it has never felt more insecure. It is environmental science that tells us that natural climate solutions – planting trees and using less fertilizer, for example - are as important as solar panels and electric cars in the fight against climate change. 

The Earth Day Network’s mission to plant a tree for every person by 2020 is a good example and could

Wiemann: Be An Environmentally Friendly Investor

on April 22, 2017 - 5:59am

Information provided by
Shelly A. Wiemann
Edward Jones Financial Advisor

On April 22, we observe Earth Day, a worldwide event focusing on protecting the environment. As a citizen of this planet, you may want to take part in Earth Day activities. And as an investor, you can learn some valuable lessons from the environmental movement.

Here are a few ideas to consider:

“Recycle” proven strategies. Over the past few decades, we have discovered ways of bringing new life to objects we would have previously thrown away.

Just One Thing To Do This Week: Build Sandcastles

on April 21, 2017 - 5:37am

By MARY BETH MAASSEN
Los Alamos

Lately I feel like I am running out of time. I have always felt there just wasn’t enough time on a day-to-day basis, but now I feel like I am running out of time in the BIG picture. As I look at the list of things I want to accomplish in my life and I compare it to the number of years I may (or may not) have left, I realize that I kinda gotta get it together pretty quickly. This has been weighing on me quite heavily. I don’t have that sense of impending doom that I usually experience before my birthday, but it is close.

When one comes to a crossroad such as

World Futures: INFORMATION - What And How Do We Teach People?

on April 21, 2017 - 5:15am

World Futures: What Do We Need?

By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute

It was not that long ago that we went to school to learn the three R’s – Reading, Writing, and Arithmetic. These skills served the student well as the foundation for learning other skills, communicating, and doing basic mathematical calculations of everyday life.  Today reading is often supplanted by video, writing has given way to keyboarding, and mathematics has become a smart phone application.

Video increases the speed of information transmission, keyboarding increases speed of composition, and the smart

McQuiston: Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives

on April 21, 2017 - 4:55am

By ALLEN MCQUISTON
The Jemez Agency

Did you know roughly half of home fire deaths result from fires that occur when most people are asleep – between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m.?

Smoke spreads quickly, and you need smoke alarms to give you time to get out. In fact, having a working smoke alarm cuts the chances of dying in a reported fire in half! Simply put, smoke alarms save lives.

A general rule of thumb is to replace the batteries in your smoke detectors when Daylight Savings Time ends and begins. Did you remember to do this with the recent time change?

Rally For Science In Santa Fe ... But Not Los Alamos

on April 19, 2017 - 9:30pm
By JODY BENSON
Los Alamos

Los Alamos isn’t hosting a Rally or a March for Science. Santa Fe is, though. It will begin at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Earth Day, at the Roundhouse. Get out there with your dedication and brilliance. Remember, there is no planet B, and scientists can prove it. 

The organizers of the March state: “The mischaracterization of science as a partisan issue, which has given policymakers permission to reject overwhelming evidence, is a critical and urgent matter.

Gessing: Governor Was Right To Wield Veto Pen

on April 19, 2017 - 3:22pm
By PAUL J. GESSING
Rio Grande Foundation
 
There has been a lot of criticism of Gov. Martinez in the wake of her use of the veto pen in the wake of the 2017 legislative session. Tough economic times are not fun and New Mexico (unlike most other states in the union) remains in the midst of tough times.
 
Democrats in the Legislature recently spoke out saying “enough is enough” referring to budget cuts and there have been increasing calls for the Legislature to override certain vetoes.
 
On can argue the merits or demerits of many of the dozens of vetoes, but the big ones on the budget

Home Field Advantage: Big Crowd, Bigger Wins

on April 18, 2017 - 5:35pm

By NICCOLO SNYDER
Community Internship Collaboration
Student Intern
Los Alamos Daily Post

High school sports give teens a chance to play on the big stage while offering a wide range of sports for locals to enjoy. During a single season a team has about half their games at home; unfortunately, not a wide range of fans show up to these home games besides a handful of parents and high school students.

This is a shame since, according to most research, fans, giving that extra cheer or holler from the stands, play a role in a team’s success and are one of the components of what is called home field

Fleming: Urban Bike Path Update

on April 17, 2017 - 10:58am
Courtesy image
 
By BRENDA FLEMING
Los Alamos
 
Last May, after attending a few county meetings on the plan of this town, I was a little depressed thinking about all the people making decisions about this town that don't actually live here. 
 
With a spark of activism, I wrote to the Los Alamos Daily Post what I wanted as a local mom and business owner – which was an urban bike path to connect the town's historical landmarks, small businesses and residential areas – the "oh-so-needed vein of the town" is how I phrased it – for tourists and locals alike. (read article here)
 
I emailed my

Los Alamos Fire Chief Troy Hughes And Naval Postgraduate Program Target Safe Travel

on April 17, 2017 - 7:41am

Courtesy photo

Staff Report

Los Alamos Fire Chief Troy Hughes is taking part in the Naval Postgraduate Program and is enlisted as a member of a small working group that consists of a TSA agent, California Highway Patrol captain, Fairfax, Va., Fire captain, Seattle Police commander and deputy chief of the Tucson Police. As a class assignment, Hughes and his group have written several columns related to travel with the focus on how to be safe while traveling.

Here is the first column in the series:

Hello current and future travelers, welcome aboard!

Griggs: Macaws On My Mind At Copán, Honduras

on April 16, 2017 - 7:31am
David Griggs poses with macaws in the interactive plaza at Macaw Mountain Bird Park & Nature Reserve. Courtesy photo
 
By DAVID H. GRIGGS
Foreign Correspondent
Los Alamos Daily Post
 
Posing with lavishly colored macaws perched on my head and arms was a great photo op and the highlight of the tour. Macaw Mountain Bird Park & Nature Reserve is a beautiful home for rescued birds in Copán Ruins, Honduras.
 
The history of bird park began on the Caribbean island of Roatan in the 1980s.

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