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Cinema Cindy Reviews 'A Man Called Ove'

on February 16, 2017 - 8:04am
By CYNTHIA BIDDLECOMB
Los Alamos
 
“A Man Called Ove” is one of the Oscar nominees for Best Foreign Language Film of 2016.
 
If you don’t speak Swedish and don’t like reading subtitles, you’ll just have to read the book by Fredrik Backman. It is terrific! What the film offers are some wonderful character performances, despite the pruned storyline.
 
The story takes place in a community of look-alike, blockhouses. Our hero Ove Lindahl used to be president of the homeowners association and since those glory days everything he sees is going to pot.
 
Every morning Ove still makes the

Gun Laws And Statistics: A Sometimes Toxic Mix

on February 15, 2017 - 6:59am
By KHALIL SPPENCER
Los Alamos

Elena Giorgi  states the oft-repeated claim that "states that have closed the loopholes have seen a huge reduction in gun homicide." I wish Ms. Giorgi and others would cite their sources for these claims because as far as I know, there is no evidence of such a huge cause and effect between closing private sales "gun show loopholes" and seeing resulting "huge" reductions in gun crime. Indeed, states with so-called "weak" gun laws range from those with very high gun homicide statistics to some having the lowest gun homicide rates.

Indeed, one can look closer to

Cinema Cindy Reviews: Jackie

on February 13, 2017 - 8:53am

Cinema Cindy Reviews Moonlight

on February 12, 2017 - 7:31am
By CYNTHIA BIDDLECOMB
Los Alamos
 
“Moonlight,” nominated for Best Picture of 2016, as well as seven other Oscars, tells the story of a young boy named Chiron, cowered by the expectations of the world around him. His environment militates against showing any kind of vulnerability. He just isn’t a tough guy, like his peers. He lacks a trusted adult in whom to confide.
 
Poster for Moonlight. Courtesy image
 
Chiron is called “Little” when he’s young, because of his diminutive stature and extreme shyness. Chiron’s mother works as a nurse, but is not home enough to care for the boy.

Smart Design With Suzette: Home Remodeling Projects That Pay Off

on February 12, 2017 - 7:27am
Roughly 10 percent of all projects nationwide had a return of more than 100 percent and every one of the projects had a payback of more than 100 percent in at least one market nationwide. Courtesy image 
 
By SUZETTE FOX
Los Alamos
 
Depending on the project, the average return on investment (ROI) nationwide for remodeling projects ranges from as high as 107.7 percent to as low as 53.9 percent. That’s the word from REMODELING Magazine’s annual Cost vs. Value Report that compared costs for 29 of the most popular professional mid-range and upscale remodeling projects in U.S.

Pastor Raul Granillo: The Love Of Hate

on February 12, 2017 - 7:13am

By PASTOR RAUL GRANILLO
Los Alamos  

Hatred stirs up dissension, but love covers over all wrongs. Proverbs 10:12 (NIV).

I doubt that there are many people who argue with this Proverb. In general, we agree that hatred is bad and love is good. So why do we see so many acts of hatred, not just from terrorists or white supremacists, but from everyday people, including ourselves?

We see hatred while we drive, when we watch the news, when we go to a little league game; even in our churches and in our own homes. Why is it so difficult for us to escape hatred?

Cinema Cindy Reviews ‘Lion’

on February 11, 2017 - 8:15am

By CYNTHIA BIDDLECOMB
Los Alamos

“Lion” brings to the screen a memoir entitled “A Long Way Home” written by an Australian writer, Saroo Brierley. The film tells how Saroo, nearly five years old, got lost from his family in northern India and ended up alone, 994 miles away, in Kolkata. Soon after, he is adopted out from an orphanage to an Australian couple.

Movie poster for 'Lion'. Courtesy photo

Dev Patel (Slumdog Millionaire) plays Saroo in all but the first third of the film, bringing to bear all the earnestness for which he is known on screen.

World Futures: What Do We Need? STUFF - Product Distribution

on February 9, 2017 - 9:05pm

By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute

As an example consider bottled water. Not the fancy kind loaded with non-water molecules or perhaps carbon dioxide (CO2). Just plain water - H2O. At a local grocery price level “ordinary” bottled water can be purchased for $3 to $4 for 24 pints or half-liters (16 oz. or 500 cc. bottles). This equates to $699 to $932 per thousand gallons.

The local price for tap water, which is very drinkable, is about $4.20 per thousand gallons plus a fixed fee of $7.93 per month no matter how many gallons are consumed for a maximum cost of $12.13 per

Just One Thing To Do This Week: Listen

on February 9, 2017 - 7:39am
By MARY BETH MAASSEN
Los Alamos

This Week: Listen

I hear my husband come through the front door.

“Hey ya!” I hear him shout cheerfully. “How ya’ been? Did you have a good day?” I can hear the smile in his voice.

I do not respond. This is because I know he is talking to our dogs. He is far more effusive when talking to our dogs than when talking to me. I have come to expect this, and accept this. I am guessing that when he enters the house, if I were to eagerly rush up to him while wiggling my butt with unbridled enthusiasm, he would probably speak to me with a little more exuberance.

Amateur Naturalist: A Small Patch Of Yellowstone In New Mexico

on February 9, 2017 - 6:08am
A vertical column of rock in Sulfur Creek canyon. Photo by Bob Dryja
 
PEEC Amateur Naturalist: A small patch of Yellowstone in New Mexico
By Robert Dryja
 
The Valles Caldera is approximately thirteen miles across. It is so large that several volcanic peaks rose up in it after its creation 1.2 million years ago.
 
Hot lava still exists beneath the caldera. This is most evident areas that have warm springs and ponds that are bubbling with hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide gases. The water can be acidic and the smell of rotten eggs fills the nearby air.

SCHIFERL: Success Was Not Mine Alone; I Owe Thanks To Many People

on February 8, 2017 - 8:48pm
By SHEILA SCHIFERL
Newly Elected UNM-LA Board Member
Los Alamos

Tesday was my first run as a candidate. Success was not mine alone; I owe thanks to many people:

First, thank you to my tireless campaign team.

Thank you to all the people we met, by phone and canvassing the town, for their advice, their participation, and their hospitality.

Thank you to the people who shared their experiences on school and college boards.

Thank you also to the people who brought us non-UNM-LA problems (including several potential hazards to children). We have contacted appropriate authorities to start

Smart Design With Suzette: Green Building - Designing Your Home To Help The Environment

on February 5, 2017 - 7:13am

By SUZETTE FOX
Los Alamos

Whether we want to admit it or not, the Earth is currently facing some serious challenges. Fires and droughts are becoming more common, and the ice caps are melting.

If climate change is going to be managed, it’s going to require participation from everyone in society. Below are a few ways you can live green and use your home to help the environment.

Use a Smart Thermostat
If you want to make your home greener, you need to make your home’s heating and cooling system more efficient. One way to do that is to install a smart thermostat.

Pastor Granillo: Beginning And The End

on February 5, 2017 - 7:08am
By Pastor Raul Granillo
Los Alamos
 
He who testifies to these things says, "Yes, I am coming soon." Amen. Come, Lord Jesus. The grace of the Lord Jesus be with God's people. Amen. (Rev. 22:20-21 NIV).
 
Those are the last two verse in the Holy Bible. They are out of a book that is very often a source of fear, confusion, and division. When read properly, these feelings are unfounded. The book of Revelation is not about a great battle, nor is it about weird happenings on earth.

Hall: LAPS School Board - Looking Ahead

on February 4, 2017 - 5:44am

LAPS Board: Why I Am Running For Re-election - Looking Ahead

 

By JIM HALL
LAPS Board President
 

Editor's note: this is the final column in a three-part series.

This is the final articleon why I am running for re-election to the LAPS Board. My first article provided basic information about LAPS as an institution, the Board, and some major accomplishments of the Board and administration (http://www.ladailypost.com/content/laps-board-why-i-am-running-re-election). The second article focused on current issues facing LAPS(http://www.ladailypost.com/content/hall-why-i-am-running-re-election

McQuiston: Proactive Steps To Help Simplify A Property Claim

on February 4, 2017 - 5:05am
By ALLEN MCQUISTON
The Jemez Agency
 
No one likes to experience home damage – it can be traumatic and costly, and it can even disrupt your entire life. But, when you do, isn’t it nice to know you have home insurance to help with the covered expenses and repairs.
 
Now, when it comes to taking advantage of your insurance benefits and filing a home insurance claim, are there certain things you can do to help things go more smoothly? There certainly are. Here are my five suggested dos and don’ts for filing a homeowners insurance claim:
 
Do call your insurance agent or insurance carrier
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How The Hen House Turns: More About Horses

on February 4, 2017 - 4:53am
By CARY NEEPER
Formerly of Los Alamos
 
I've never known a horse well. That's why I was intrigued by Margit H. Zeitler-Feicht's book Horse Behavior Explained.
 
She goes into great detail about all their physical and emotional needs and how they can be served, as noted in an October article here. Parelli.com's "Natural Horsemanship," summarized so generously for me by my dear friend Christen Howell, takes a different approach. It adds a sensitive personality dimension to approaching and training horses.

Cinema Cindy Reviews ‘Eagle Huntress’

on February 3, 2017 - 6:15pm
Movie Poster for 'Eagle Hunstress'. Courtesy photo

By CYNTHIA BIDDLECOMB
Los Alamos

“Eagle Huntress” is a documentary that tells the story of Aisholpan Nurgaiv, a 13-year-old Mongolian girl who wants to be an eagle hunter like her father and the eleven generations of men before him. The problem is, she is female.

Aisholpan Nurgaiv plays herself in the film, and this is her true story. Her father, Rys Nurgaiv, and his father have been eagle hunting all of Aisholpan’s life. She is really keen to be trained, herself. Her father thinks boys and girls are equal and can do anything.

Just One Thing To Do This Week: Exercise

on February 3, 2017 - 7:43am

By MARY BETH MAASSEN
Los Alamos

You know it was bound to happen. I have written about eating less sugar (a daily struggle), drinking more water (easier than eating less sugar), and getting more restful sleep (dream away), but now we have to talk about exercise. Of course, talking about exercise is the easy part.

Actually doing exercise is the hard part.

I have boxes of DVDs showcasing various belly-busting, butt-firming and thigh-slimming workouts. I found them again just this last weekend. I have not watched them in years, maybe decades, and some of the DVDs have never even been opened.

An Open Book: Ex Libris, Part I

on February 3, 2017 - 7:26am

By DAVID IZRAELEVITZ
Los Alamos

Books are my touchstones. Opening a book I have already read takes me back in time; unread books sitting on my shelf beckon me to enter their world sometime soon. But this book world is not the story inside. A Kindle or a tablet may contain the same story as a tattered hardcover, but is it the physicality of the book that summons; touching the book again is what brings me back.

I have many stories about books that I would like to share with you.

World Futures: What Do We Need? STUFF - Energy Storage | Conversion | Distribution | System Efficiency

on February 3, 2017 - 7:16am

By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute

At the most basic level, all life as we know it is dependent on energy. To function, a living entity must either acquire energy or use energy stored within itself or cease to exist as a living entity. In this description, a dormant entity is not living, rather is waiting activation.

As human beings our existence requires a continuing source of energy. Indeed the evolution and complexity of our diverse life support structure has increased our need for energy many fold.  But how do we measure it? In terms we can fathom?

Cinema Cindy Reviews ‘La La Land’

on February 3, 2017 - 7:03am

By CYNTHIA BIDDLECOMB
Los Alamos

“La La Land” is a pejorative term for “Los Angeles” that is used only by people who don’t live there. I’m sure the name must refer to a supposedly carefree lifestyle, seemingly unending sunshine, and a Hollywood full of starry-eyed dreamers. Having grown up with a very different experience of Los Angeles, I have never resonated with the pejorative term. But one thing the title of this movie tells me is that the filmmakers are intent on a few inside jokes for Angelinos, like me.

Movie poster for 'La La Land'. Courtesy photo

Take the opening scene: a traffic

This Week At The Reel Deal

on February 3, 2017 - 6:49am

Benson: Unlike Phil, Gus Is A Rodent's Rodent

on February 2, 2017 - 9:03am
By JODY BENSON, Chair
Pajarito Group of the Sierra Club

Thursday, Feb 2, demarcates the point in the calendar halfway between the winter solstice and spring equinox. In simpler times, (prior to anthropogenic green-house gases causing climate change with the resulting unpredictability of atmospheric conditions) on this day—Groundhog Day—it would be up to the groundhog to partner with his shadow to determine the weather for the next six weeks.

Here in New Mexico, as many of you already know, we do not have groundhogs. Rather we have gophers.

Schiferl: Why I'm Running For UNM-LA Board

on February 1, 2017 - 4:12pm
By SHEILA K. SCHIFERL
Los Alamos

Why am I running for the UNM-LA board?  The challenges for UNM-LA revolve around careful allocation of resources and improving administrative procedures – numbers, details, budgeting. I've always been a numbers and detail person. I've been a theoretical physicist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, working both in statistical methods and applied metallurgy. Even within the Lab, I was the "math/detail person," checking whether the results of both experiments and computations made physical sense.

Mesa Public Library Screens 'Before Sunset' Thursday

on January 31, 2017 - 6:10am

Movie poster for 'Before Sunset'. Courtesy image

 

Review by KELLY DOLEJSI

Los Alamos

 

Those who love a good conversation, or more specifically, those who love analyzing the way a conversation moves its interlocutors from cautious to intimate, should check out “Before Sunset” (2004, rated R). It will screen at 6:30 p.m. Thursday in Mesa Public Library’s upstairs meeting room theater.

 

The award-winning film is part two of a trilogy shot over the span of nearly 20 years, beginning with 1995’s “Before Sunrise” and completing with 2013’s “Before Midnight.” Director/screenwriter Richard

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