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Smart Design With Suzette: The Garagenous Zone

on April 24, 2017 - 7:07am

By SUZETTE FOX
Los Alamos

Garages have a way of going from (relatively) organized to complete chaos in no time at all. It then becomes a glorified shed. But, let’s face it, garage organization can be daunting and overwhelming. However, if you have a game plan, it can be a piece of cake. In this column, I will help you get started, give options for storage, safety, going green and other tips that you might not have heard before.

The Best Reason to Tackle This Project

If you’re like most of us, your car is a five-figure investment that you can’t do without.

Fr. Glenn: Living The Better Life

on April 23, 2017 - 7:56am
By Rev. Glenn Jones
Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church
Los Alamos

Very often people complain about their lives being tough or difficult. Certainly there are very hard and tragic situations—the unexpected illness and/or death of loved ones, or one’s child pursuing a path toward self-destruction and the like. Yet many of our problems tend to be of our own making, and sometimes our anxieties stem partially from our modern loss of perspective. After all, we here in L.A. County live in what is consistently rated as among the best communities to live in the U.S.

Pastor Granillo: Protecting The Truth

on April 23, 2017 - 7:44am
By PASTOR RAUL GRANILLO 
La Vista Church of the Nazarene

Los Alamos
 
If you’re lying, you’re lying. –John Maxwell
 
I vaguely remember being awakened by a noise as a small child. It was near Christmas time, so I immediately assumed that I had heard Santa in our house. Although I was partially excited about this possibility, I was more afraid than anything, so I tucked myself tightly under the blankets and went back to sleep. The next morning, I wanted to tell my mom about the exciting news.
 
I decided that the story might need some embellishment to convince her it was true, so I

Earth Day Statement From The Nature Conservancy

on April 23, 2017 - 12:54am
By Justin Adams
Global Managing Director, Lands
 
We’re absolutely thrilled to see so much public support out on the streets for science and scientists. My field of environmental science has probably never been more important as today - and yet it has never felt more insecure. It is environmental science that tells us that natural climate solutions – planting trees and using less fertilizer, for example - are as important as solar panels and electric cars in the fight against climate change. 

The Earth Day Network’s mission to plant a tree for every person by 2020 is a good example and could

Wiemann: Be An Environmentally Friendly Investor

on April 22, 2017 - 5:59am

Information provided by
Shelly A. Wiemann
Edward Jones Financial Advisor

On April 22, we observe Earth Day, a worldwide event focusing on protecting the environment. As a citizen of this planet, you may want to take part in Earth Day activities. And as an investor, you can learn some valuable lessons from the environmental movement.

Here are a few ideas to consider:

“Recycle” proven strategies. Over the past few decades, we have discovered ways of bringing new life to objects we would have previously thrown away.

Just One Thing To Do This Week: Build Sandcastles

on April 21, 2017 - 5:37am

By MARY BETH MAASSEN
Los Alamos

Lately I feel like I am running out of time. I have always felt there just wasn’t enough time on a day-to-day basis, but now I feel like I am running out of time in the BIG picture. As I look at the list of things I want to accomplish in my life and I compare it to the number of years I may (or may not) have left, I realize that I kinda gotta get it together pretty quickly. This has been weighing on me quite heavily. I don’t have that sense of impending doom that I usually experience before my birthday, but it is close.

When one comes to a crossroad such as

World Futures: INFORMATION - What And How Do We Teach People?

on April 21, 2017 - 5:15am

World Futures: What Do We Need?

By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute

It was not that long ago that we went to school to learn the three R’s – Reading, Writing, and Arithmetic. These skills served the student well as the foundation for learning other skills, communicating, and doing basic mathematical calculations of everyday life.  Today reading is often supplanted by video, writing has given way to keyboarding, and mathematics has become a smart phone application.

Video increases the speed of information transmission, keyboarding increases speed of composition, and the smart

McQuiston: Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives

on April 21, 2017 - 4:55am

By ALLEN MCQUISTON
The Jemez Agency

Did you know roughly half of home fire deaths result from fires that occur when most people are asleep – between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m.?

Smoke spreads quickly, and you need smoke alarms to give you time to get out. In fact, having a working smoke alarm cuts the chances of dying in a reported fire in half! Simply put, smoke alarms save lives.

A general rule of thumb is to replace the batteries in your smoke detectors when Daylight Savings Time ends and begins. Did you remember to do this with the recent time change?

Rally For Science In Santa Fe ... But Not Los Alamos

on April 19, 2017 - 9:30pm
By JODY BENSON
Los Alamos

Los Alamos isn’t hosting a Rally or a March for Science. Santa Fe is, though. It will begin at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Earth Day, at the Roundhouse. Get out there with your dedication and brilliance. Remember, there is no planet B, and scientists can prove it. 

The organizers of the March state: “The mischaracterization of science as a partisan issue, which has given policymakers permission to reject overwhelming evidence, is a critical and urgent matter.

Gessing: Governor Was Right To Wield Veto Pen

on April 19, 2017 - 3:22pm
By PAUL J. GESSING
Rio Grande Foundation
 
There has been a lot of criticism of Gov. Martinez in the wake of her use of the veto pen in the wake of the 2017 legislative session. Tough economic times are not fun and New Mexico (unlike most other states in the union) remains in the midst of tough times.
 
Democrats in the Legislature recently spoke out saying “enough is enough” referring to budget cuts and there have been increasing calls for the Legislature to override certain vetoes.
 
On can argue the merits or demerits of many of the dozens of vetoes, but the big ones on the budget

Home Field Advantage: Big Crowd, Bigger Wins

on April 18, 2017 - 5:35pm

By NICCOLO SNYDER
Community Internship Collaboration
Student Intern
Los Alamos Daily Post

High school sports give teens a chance to play on the big stage while offering a wide range of sports for locals to enjoy. During a single season a team has about half their games at home; unfortunately, not a wide range of fans show up to these home games besides a handful of parents and high school students.

This is a shame since, according to most research, fans, giving that extra cheer or holler from the stands, play a role in a team’s success and are one of the components of what is called home field

Fleming: Urban Bike Path Update

on April 17, 2017 - 10:58am
Courtesy image
 
By BRENDA FLEMING
Los Alamos
 
Last May, after attending a few county meetings on the plan of this town, I was a little depressed thinking about all the people making decisions about this town that don't actually live here. 
 
With a spark of activism, I wrote to the Los Alamos Daily Post what I wanted as a local mom and business owner – which was an urban bike path to connect the town's historical landmarks, small businesses and residential areas – the "oh-so-needed vein of the town" is how I phrased it – for tourists and locals alike. (read article here)
 
I emailed my

Los Alamos Fire Chief Troy Hughes And Naval Postgraduate Program Target Safe Travel

on April 17, 2017 - 7:41am

Courtesy photo

Staff Report

Los Alamos Fire Chief Troy Hughes is taking part in the Naval Postgraduate Program and is enlisted as a member of a small working group that consists of a TSA agent, California Highway Patrol captain, Fairfax, Va., Fire captain, Seattle Police commander and deputy chief of the Tucson Police. As a class assignment, Hughes and his group have written several columns related to travel with the focus on how to be safe while traveling.

Here is the first column in the series:

Hello current and future travelers, welcome aboard!

Griggs: Macaws On My Mind At Copán, Honduras

on April 16, 2017 - 7:31am
David Griggs poses with macaws in the interactive plaza at Macaw Mountain Bird Park & Nature Reserve. Courtesy photo
 
By DAVID H. GRIGGS
Foreign Correspondent
Los Alamos Daily Post
 
Posing with lavishly colored macaws perched on my head and arms was a great photo op and the highlight of the tour. Macaw Mountain Bird Park & Nature Reserve is a beautiful home for rescued birds in Copán Ruins, Honduras.
 
The history of bird park began on the Caribbean island of Roatan in the 1980s.

Fr. Glenn: An Unfinished Journey

on April 16, 2017 - 7:19am
By Rev. Glenn Jones
Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church
Los Alamos

A very blessed and happy Easter to all as we Christians celebrate the (literal, not figurative) resurrection of Jesus from death 2000 years ago. This is one of the absolutely central tenets of the Christian faith. For those unfamiliar with Christianity, know that we believe that Jesus died by crucifixion to take upon us the punishment each person rightly deserves in justice for personal wrongs against God and other people.

Pastor Granillo: All Good Things…

on April 16, 2017 - 6:58am
By Pastor Raul Granillo
La Vista Church of the Nazarene
White Rock

All good things must come to an end. Geoffrey Chaucer

There is a great deal of mystery that surrounds Mary Magdalene. Although the Bible says nothing of the sort, many believe her to have been a prostitute or an otherwise scandalous woman.

How The Hen House Turns—Bird Minds

on April 15, 2017 - 6:00am
Lucy and Bobbi at a stock tank. Courtesy photo
 
How the Hen House Turns—Bird Minds
By Cary Neeper


While watching our turkey, Little Bear, march across the backyard, it wasn’t difficult to believe that birds descended from dinosaurs. Little Bear (Turkey2) looked like a miniature T-Rex with her long neck stretching forward from a round body balanced over two long legs.

When I stretched out a hand filled with cracked corn, and she would rush over to snatch up the treat. Her gustatory preferences always surprised me. Why did she find dried corn kernels so delicious?

Column: Is There A Secret To Grieving?

on April 14, 2017 - 1:27pm

By Los Alamos Visiting Nurse Service

The grieving person will often experience a heightened awareness and sensitivity to the reality that is the world. A person who is unalterably changed by the loss of a loved one may wonder how it is possible for others to be carrying on daily life, expressing joy, laughter, optimism and hope for the future. The grieving person is bereft, often at a loss for words and lacking the energy to get through the day. Is there a secret to grieving in a way that allows you to continue to live life in a meaningful and fulfilling way?

Just One Thing To Do This Week: Pick It Up

on April 14, 2017 - 7:31am

By MARY BETH MAASSEN
Los Alamos

Easter is my favorite holiday for several reasons: When the kids are little, Easter lasts all day. As long as you have the energy to hide the eggs, the kiddos will have energy to find them. It is more about the engagement than the gifts.

Christmas is busy, demanding, overwhelming, expensive, and then in blur of gift wrap it is over by 10 a.m., and the kids are once again waiting to be entertained … at least that was my experience any way.

Cooking for Easter is way easier than cooking for any other holiday.

This Week At The Reel Deal

on April 14, 2017 - 7:20am

World Futures: What Do We Need?

on April 14, 2017 - 7:19am
By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World Futures Institute

At the basic level, a computer is a system of switches that can be either on or off or perhaps somewhere in between.

In the off or on case, it uses binary mathematics to solve a mathematical problem. It receives input data, manipulates the switches, and outputs other data. Today the term refers to doing this process electronically even though it could be done mechanically. For an interesting side light, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Babbage#Difference_engine.

The key concept here is that the computer is an electromechanical

Izraelevitz: Passover, Glazed Donuts, And Graduate School

on April 14, 2017 - 7:10am
By DAVID IZRAELEVITZ
Los Alamos

Passover, glazed donuts, and graduate school do not mix well. This is a fact that I encountered, for five consecutive years, when I was a graduate student working on my doctoral degree. Full appreciation of this physical law requires some background, so please bear with me for a paragraph or two.

Passover, or Pesach in Hebrew, is the Jewish week-long holiday celebrating the Biblical Exodus of the Jews from Egypt. This year it started this past Monday evening.

McQuiston: Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives

on April 13, 2017 - 8:50am
By ALLEN MCQUISTON
The Jemez Agency
 
Did you know roughly half of home fire deaths result from fires that occur when most people are asleep – between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m.?
 
Smoke spreads quickly, and you need smoke alarms to give you time to get out. In fact, having a working smoke alarm cuts the chances of dying in a reported fire in half!  Simply put, smoke alarms save lives.
 
A general rule of thumb is to replace the batteries in your smoke detectors when Daylight Savings Time ends and begins. Did you remember to do this with the recent time change?

Op-ed: Vetoes Raise Concerns

on April 13, 2017 - 8:46am
By Rep. Stephanie Garcia Richard
Los Alamos, Santa Fe, Sandoval & Rio Arriba

This week I had planned to provide my next installment of post legislative wrap up, however recent events have prompted a change in topic.

This past legislative session, amidst ever shrinking revenue forecasts and mounting needs in the state budget, legislators—House and Senate, Democrat and Republican—decided to take action by crafting a budget with no additional cuts and an accompanying revenue package that raised $350 million in new dollars for the state with such targeted, moderate revenue increases as: 

Fr. Glenn: Love And Self-Sacrifice

on April 9, 2017 - 6:49am
By Rev. Glenn Jones
Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church
Los Alamos

As we come to Holy Week—the week which precedes Easter Sunday—there are many events upon which Christians focus: the Last Supper of Jesus with His apostles on Holy Thursday, His Passion (from the Latin “passio”, meaning “suffering”), His death from crucifixion, His entombment, and His resurrection early on Easter Sunday morning. Christians, of course, believe these events to be quite literal and quite historical, and Jesus’ resurrection is the very basis of our hope in life after physical death.

Of course, many don’t

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