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Amateur Naturalist: Observing Birds Long Term

on December 12, 2017 - 10:58am
White-winged doves are increasing both in numbers and occupied areas. Photo by Bob Walker

 

By ROBERT DRYJA

Los Alamos
 
Citizen science refers to individuals collecting and submitting data to an organization that then collates the data from many people. The Ornithology Department of Cornell University has been collecting bird sightings for thirty years for the United States and Canada. The program is called “Project FeederWatch”. Participants provide weekly counts of the different species of birds that they see at their bird feeders during the winter months.

Montaño: Hilltopper Hoops Roundup

on December 12, 2017 - 6:47am
By RJ Montaño
Los Alamos Daily Post
rjmontano@ladailypost.com

Boys’ Basketball

BELEN – The Los Alamos Hilltopper boys’ basketball team finished in third place at the Hub City Tournament at Belen High School. The ‘Toppers beat Mission Achievement and Success Charter out of Albuquerque in the first round by a 69-23 score to advance to the winners bracket.

The ‘Toppers ran into a strong 6-A Manzano team, also out of Albuquerque, losing a very tight contest 71-65. The Monarchs ended up winning the Hub City Tournament over host Belen.

In the third place game, Los Alamos faced another 6-A team in

Home Country: It Must Have Been The Weather

on December 11, 2017 - 9:20am
Home Country
By SLIM RANDLES
 
It began the way most miracles do: by accident or the hand of God, take your pick.
 
It might have been the weather, at least partly. For December, the day had been almost balmy and warm. You know, sweaters instead of heavy coats. No mittens in sight.
 
Then there were Christmas lights on the stores, and that little bunch of Girl Scouts out raising money in front of the Read Me Now bookstore.
 
Jasper Blankenship was inside going through the books to fortify his cabin’s library for winter and sat, listening with a smile to the girls as they laughed and

Cinema Cindy Reviews: ‘The Star’

on December 11, 2017 - 8:43am
By CYNTHIA BIDDLECOMB
Los Alamos
 
“The Star” is an animated feature film telling the story of the first Christmas through the eyes of animals. It is a lovely film with compelling animal characters and an uplifting message. For those who would enjoy a new perspective on the first chapter of “the greatest story ever told”, this is a film for you.
 
The film is co-produced by Affirm Films, Sony Pictures’ arm for movies that tell wholesome stories, often on faith topics.

Cinema Cindy Reviews: Wonder

on December 10, 2017 - 3:18pm
By CYNTHIA BIDDLECOMB
Los Alamos

“Wonder” can be a chosen attitude toward life. It is also the name of a new movie about a 5th grader in New York City who is going to school for the first time.

The 5th grader is August Pullman who was born with a genetic defect called “Treacher Collins Syndrome” resulting in his having a disfigured face. He has been home schooled for years, but now, his parents feel, it is time he went to school with other kids and learned to deal with the real world.

Auggie realizes that kids will recoil at the sight of his face. Yet he hopes for better.

Fr. Glenn: Lessons From A Coyote

on December 10, 2017 - 7:09am
By Rev. Glenn Jones
Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church
Los Alamos

Walking across our frigid parking lot last Thursday morning, as I often do I saw a coyote trotting along the edge in that characteristic coyote lope … returning from her journey to who-knows-where (likely scavenging around the high school … gnawing on tender freshmen now and again?) But this isn’t just any ol’ coyote; she’s the same one I’ve seen skulking about since early spring—easily recognized by an apparent malady reducing her fur to a minimum.

Home Country: December Dreaming

on December 9, 2017 - 4:50am
Home Country
By SLIM RANDLES
 
There is a nighttime sweetness and hope that hovers over us this time of year here at home. This is a time for summing up and looking ahead … and a time for dreams.
 
And at night … ah, that’s the time, isn’t it? Outside it’s dark, December dark, and we’re inside and warm and cocooned up. The cold makes our world shrink, especially at night. But we have our dreams.
 
For Janice Thomas, our art teacher at the high school, it’s that painting she’s planning.

Communication 1: Impediment Of Language Barriers

on December 8, 2017 - 6:47am
By SONYIA WILLIAMS
Los Alamos World
Futures Institute
Student Intern

One of the most prevalent obstacles standing in the way of universal communication among mankind is the language barrier. This language barrier, defined by the Oxford Dictionary as being “a barrier to communication between people who are unable to speak a common language”, prevents worldwide communication between people of all countries, cultures, and, most of all, languages.


But what steps have been taken to surpass this barrier?

Yang: Fake It Till You Make It

on December 8, 2017 - 6:43am

By ELENA YANG
Formerly of Los Alamos

My previous column was largely based on Amy Cuddy’s research and TED talk in which she posits that a two-minute Wonder Woman’s power posture, hands on hips, would cause a spike in one’s adrenaline to accompany the assertion of confidence, which in turn leads to greater willingness to take risks in subsequent behavior.

Many followers of her TED presentation have commented that the power posture really works and has helped them build their confidence.

Just One Thing To Do This Week: Seek Inspiration

on December 7, 2017 - 3:17pm

By MARY BETH MAASSEN
Los Alamos

I enjoy writing, but I love reading even more. I was in Nashville on Small Business Saturday and made a point to stop by the independent bookstore co-owned by one of my favorite authors, Ann Patchett.

I opened the door to the busy shop, and Ann was standing right there, helping a patron find a book. I knew she co-owned the shop, but I never thought for minute she would be there working.

“Oh my god,” I whisper to my husband, “there is Ann Patchett!”

“Is that someone from Los Alamos?” He asked.

“Not hardly,” I say, as I take off to follow her around the

This Week At The Reel Deal

on December 7, 2017 - 2:43pm

Shin: $7 million Kiddie Pool With $34 Million Cash Cow

on December 7, 2017 - 9:41am
By LISA SHIN
Los Alamos

Earlier this year, Councilor Chris Chandler told us that what the voters would decide in the REC Bond election, would become the “Council’s marching orders.”

So I ask, was a $5 million or a $7 million kiddie pool the voters’ “marching orders”? A $5 million pool was questionable. But $7 million? Citizens voiced their opinions and made their voices heard on May 23, 2017. We had hoped that our County Council would vote on what the majority wanted. Democracy in action. Apparently, that was asking too much.

Further, Councilor Susan O’Leary told us that “if the bond fails, $7

Common Questions For Los Alamos History Museum

on December 7, 2017 - 7:59am
Gen. Leslies Groves thought Los Alamos would be easy to guard, and Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer loved the inspiring vistas. Courtesy photo
 
By HEATHER MCCLENAHAN
Los Alamos Historical Society
 
There are two common questions that visitors ask at the Los Alamos History Museum. Why was Los Alamos chosen for the Manhattan Project? and How did Bathtub Row get its name?
 
Those popular questions aren’t just from out-of- town visitors; they often come from our own residents, so here are the answers.
 
Los Alamos was an ideal location for a top-secret laboratory for the Manhattan Project.

Cinema Cindy Reviews 'Lady Bird'

on December 4, 2017 - 3:18pm
By CYNTHIA BIDDLECOMB
Los Alamos
 
“Lady Bird” is Greta Gerwig’s first solo venture into film writing and directing. It most assuredly won’t be her last! Lady Bird, though not quite autobiographical, is a heart-warming tale about a mother-daughter relationship, taking place in Gerwig’s hometown of Sacramento, California.
 
Lady Bird tells the story of high school senior Christine McPherson, who has given herself the name “Lady Bird”—“It’s my given name; I gave it to myself,” she says.
 
Convincing in the role of 17-year-old Lady Bird is Saoirse Ronan (star of the 2015 film, Brooklyn),

Fr. Glenn: Whatever Is Honorable

on December 3, 2017 - 6:32am

By Rev. Glenn Jones
Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church
Los Alamos

With all this sexual harassment stuff these days, we hesitate to click a news website or open a newspaper, for it means to receive yet another new revelation of some luminary who has strayed far from the path of propriety … followed by the almost inevitable “apology” … even though their malfeasance may have continued to the very time of being revealed. So … is he sorry for the behavior, or just sorry he was caught? One can’t help but wonder; one can’t help but doubt.

Pastor Granillo: He Is Coming

on December 3, 2017 - 6:07am
Pastor Raul Granillo
La Vista Church of the Nazarene
White Rock

When He returns is not as important as the fact that we are ready for Him when He does return. ―A.W. Tozer

My mom was a working, single mom. (For the record, these people are among the highest level of superheroes.) This meant that my siblings and I would often come home from school and find the house empty because mom had to go to work. We had a procedure in place for when this happened. We were to lock the doors, find the list that she left for us, and then call her to let her know we were all safely at home.

Amateur Naturalist: The Mathematical Symmetry Of Pine Cones

on December 2, 2017 - 7:55am
The shape of the pinecone bracts create eight spirals going outward and counter clockwise. Photo by Robert Dryja
 
The Mathematical Symmetry of Pine Cones
By ROBERT DRYJA
Amateur Naturalist
 
 
The shape of the pine cones lying on the ground below a tree provides a kind of predictability that is the complete opposite to predicting the youthfulness or maturity of a tree. A cone grows overlapping bracts that protect the developing seeds within. When the seeds mature, the bracts open. The seeds then may flutter away to germinate or become food for some animal or insect.
 
What

McQuiston: Did You Know Today’s Homes Burn Faster

on December 1, 2017 - 10:19am
By ALLEN MCQUISTON
The Jemez Agency
 
From building materials to furnishings, many of the things in your home likely aren’t as flame-resistant as those from yesteryear.
 
A fire in a modern home is a “perfect storm,” according to safety consulting and certification company UL (Underwriters Laboratories).
 
Larger homes, more open layouts, new construction materials and other factors mean fires burn more quickly, leaving less time for occupants to escape — and for firefighters to stop the flames. How much less time?

Stampeding Bull Market May Slow Down: Be Prepared

on December 1, 2017 - 9:34am
Provided by SHELLY A. WIEMANN
Financial Advisor
Edward Jones

As you know, we’ve been enjoying a long period of steadily rising stock prices. Of course, this bull market won’t last forever – and when it does start losing steam, you, as an investor, need to be prepared.

Before we look at how you can ready yourself for a new phase in the investment environment, let’s consider some facts about the current situation:

Length – This bull market, which began in 2009, is the second-oldest in the past 100 years – and it’s about twice as long as the average bull market.

Strength – Since the start of

Just One Thing To Do This Week: Be Enchanted

on December 1, 2017 - 8:57am
By MARY BETH MAASSEN
Los Alamos

The Land of Enchantment is a fitting moniker for New Mexico. The towering red rock mesas, the snowcapped peaks, dramatic cliffs and canyons.

Of all the activities and destinations that New Mexico has to offer, not one envelopes my heart and spirit quite like Light Among the Ruins, at the Jemez Historic Site (formerly the Jemez National Monument). It is always a mind-blowing, magical evening, and my favorite tradition.

It usually goes something like this:

We arrive in the Village of Jemez Springs in mid-afternoon to take advantage of the community activities

World Futures: Money, Trade, Value And Time Part 8

on December 1, 2017 - 7:33am
By ANDY ANDREWS
Los Alamos World
Futures Institute

In part seven of this series we ended with three types of money on the table: gold (and other precious metals), fiat money (paper notes or data entries on a cyber ledger) backed by a government entity, and bitcoins backed by trust in no one other than the users.

In all cases, value is accrued by perception and is essential for timely trade (in exchange for goods and services). And we use government controlled banking systems to facilitate the process except when the monetary medium is physical (paper money or gold) or non-government bits and

This Week At The Reel Deal

on November 30, 2017 - 12:35pm

Inspirational People: Sharing Positive Traits

on November 30, 2017 - 4:33am
By CAROL A. CLARK
Los Alamos Daily Post

A local resident revealed that he has held another person in town in high esteem – for years – yet never thought to mention it.

“I discovered early in the years I’ve served on boards and worked on community projects with her that she is keenly intelligent, impeccably mannered and always conducts herself on the highest ethical plane … yet it never occurred to me to tell her,” he said.

He was humbled to learn that she for as many years harbored similar opinions of him.

Weekly Fishing Report: Nov. 29

on November 29, 2017 - 2:20pm
By GEORGE MORSE
Sports and Outdoors
Los Alamos Daily Post
 
The weather remained unseasonably warm and dry last week. There are reports of changes in the weather for this coming week. Temperatures may drop to what would be normal for this time of year.
 
The fishing picked up at Abiquiu Lake last week and there were finally reports of trout being caught. This could be due to the recent stocking of fingerling rainbow trout. Larger predatory fish can be attracted to the area where these fish were stocked.

Home Country: Morning Coffee

on November 29, 2017 - 5:57am
Home Country
By SLIM RANDLES
 
“Ahhh! Coffee!” said our resident cowboy, Steve, raising his cup at the philosophy counter. “Let’s raise our cups to whichever Brazilian came up with this stuff.”
 
Very slowly, Herb Collins stood with his cup of coffee there in the midst of culture and education at the Mule Barn truck stop.
 
“Actually, Steve,” Herb said, in his most professorial tone, “his name was Kaldi. He lived in Ethiopia.” And here Herb grinned fiendlishly at Steve. “And he was a sheepherder!”
 
“No way, Herb!”
 
“The truth, cowboy, nothing but the truth.

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